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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 30 0 Browse Search
Euripides, The Trojan Women (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 16 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 16 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller) 14 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 14 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 12 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 12 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 12 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 10 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler). You can also browse the collection for Phrygia (Turkey) or search for Phrygia (Turkey) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 5 document sections:

Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 3, line 161 (search)
al chamber, my friends, my darling daughter, and all the companions of my girlhood. But it was not to be, and my lot is one of tears and sorrow. As for your question, the hero of whom you ask is Agamemnon, son of Atreus, a good king and a brave warrior, brother-in-law as surely as that he lives, to my abhorred and miserable self." The old man marveled at him and said, "Happy son of Atreus, child of good fortune. I see that the Achaeans are subject to you in great multitudes. When I was in Phrygia I saw much horsemen, the people of Otreus and of Mygdon, who were camping upon the banks of the river Sangarios; I was their ally, and with them when the Amazons, peers of men, came up against them, but even they were not so many as the Achaeans." The old man next looked upon Odysseus; "Tell me," he said, "who is that other, shorter by a head than Agamemnon, but broader across the chest and shoulders? His armor is laid upon the ground, and he stalks in front of the ranks as it were some g
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 3, line 324 (search)
ith beauty and dressed in gorgeous apparel. No one would think he had just come from fighting, but rather that he was going to a dance [khoros], or had done dancing [khoros] and was sitting down." With these words she moved the heart of Helen to anger. When she marked the beautiful neck of the goddess, her lovely bosom, and sparkling eyes, she marveled at her and said, "Goddess, why do you thus beguile me? Are you going to send me afield still further to some man whom you have taken up in Phrygia or fair Meonia? Menelaos has just vanquished Alexander, and is to take my hateful self back with him. You are come here to betray me. Go sit with Alexander yourself; henceforth be goddess no longer; never let your feet carry you back to Olympus; worry about him and look after him till he make you his wife, or, for the matter of that, his slave - but me? I shall not go; I can garnish his bed no longer; I should be a by-word among all the women of Troy. Besides, I have trouble [akhos] on my m
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 16, line 658 (search)
Achilles who is a far better man than you are." On hearing this, Patroklos withdrew to some distance and avoided the anger [mênis] of Apollo. Meanwhile Hektor was waiting with his horses inside the Scaean gates, in doubt whether to drive out again and go on fighting, or to call the army inside the gates. As he was thus doubting Phoebus Apollo drew near him in the likeness of a young and lusty warrior Asios, who was Hektor's uncle, being own brother to Hecuba, and son of Dymas who lived in Phrygia by the waters of the river Sangarios; in his likeness Zeus' son Apollo now spoke to Hektor saying, "Hektor, why have you left off fighting? It is ill done of you. If I were as much better a man than you, as I am worse, you should soon rue your slackness. Drive straight towards Patroklos, if so be that Apollo may grant you a triumph over him, and you may kill him." With this the god went back into the struggle [ponos], and Hektor bade Kebriones drive again into the fight. Apollo passed in
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 18, line 254 (search)
o try and force his way into the city. Neither will he ever sack it, dogs shall devour him ere he do so." Hektor looked fiercely at him and answered, "Polydamas, your words are not to my liking in that you bid us go back and be pent within the city. Have you not had enough of being cooped up behind walls? In the old-days the city of Priam was famous the whole world over for its wealth of gold and bronze, but our treasures are wasted out of our houses, and much goods have been sold away to Phrygia and fair Meonia, for the hand of Zeus has been laid heavily upon us. Now, therefore, that the son of scheming Kronos has granted me to win glory here and to hem the Achaeans in at their ships, prate no more in this fool's wise among the population [dêmos]. You will have no man with you; it shall not be; do all of you as I now say; - take your suppers in your companies throughout the host, and keep your watches and be wakeful every man of you. If any Trojan is uneasy about his possessions, l
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 24, line 468 (search)
is bride. But even on him too did heaven send misfortune, for there is no race of royal children born to him in his house, save one son who is doomed to die all untimely; nor may I take care of him now that he is growing old, for I must stay here at Troy to be the bane of you and your children. And you too, O Priam, I have heard that you were aforetime happy [olbios]. They say that in wealth and plenitude of offspring you surpassed all that is in Lesbos, the realm of Makar to the northward, Phrygia that is more inland, and those that dwell upon the great Hellespont; but from the day when the dwellers in heaven sent this evil upon you, war and slaughter have been about your city continually. Bear up against it, and let there be some intervals in your sorrow. Mourn as you may for your brave son, you will take nothing by it. You cannot raise him from the dead, ere you do so yet another sorrow shall befall you." And Priam answered, "O king, bid me not be seated, while Hektor is still