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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,742 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 1,016 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 996 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 516 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 274 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 180 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 172 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 164 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 142 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 130 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Alabama (Alabama, United States) or search for Alabama (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

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Introductory the First Spanish occupation of Alabama battles fought by De Soto settlement at Mobthe first white men who ever trod the soil of Alabama. In May, 1539, Hernando de Soto, with 1,000 months in passing through what is now the State of Alabama. They were met on the eastern border wit; and the early occupancy by the French of South Alabama was constantly disturbed by conflicts withh finally, in 1765, established themselves in Alabama, an agreement being made by which the territo 1787 marched from the Cumberland region into Alabama against the depredating Indians. They were swed by many other atrocities on the people of Alabama, and under orders from the general government effectually ended the Indian disturbances in Alabama, the savages gladly entering into a treaty ofMarch 1817, the present territorial limits of Alabama were defined by Congress, and on December 14, William R. King were among the officers from Alabama who were killed in battle during the Mexican [9 more...]
pter 2: Secession and its causes the slavery Question Alabama's Declaration prior to the nomination of Lincoln the Charleston ce and Jackson, the Johnstons and Bragg. Still, many of those from Alabama are yet living and hold positions of trust and honor, continuing tl be hereafter politically and morally. The Democratic party of Alabama assembled in convention at Montgomery, January 11, 1860, and with thout a parallel in history; and, Whereas, the General Assembly of Alabama, representing a people loyally devoted to the Union of the Constiton of said convention, the rights, interests, and honor of the State of Alabama requires to be done for their protection. The national Demor the majority report. This was the signal for disruption. The Alabama delegation withdrew from the convention, followed by those of the s24,926 John C. Breckinridge168,400 John Bell94,444 The vote in Alabama: Abraham Lincoln Stephen A. Douglas13,651 John C. Breckinridge4
s campaigns and battles in Alabama some of Alabama's distinguished soldiers. I have made quity resumed and vested in the people of the State of Alabama. Be it resolved by the people of Alabaennent Lomax commanded the Second regiment of Alabama militia, which had been organized soon after ion of the Federals, the northern counties of Alabama were harassed by continuous raids. In April,tions relative to the present condition of North Alabama, and the necessity of permanently holding The city of Mobile was the most important in Alabama, and had been at the beginning of the conflic's column from the south and Wilson's from north Alabama. Maury's cavalry was kept busy skirmish While these operations were going on in south Alabama. General Wilson was on his famous raid frolancthon Smith entered the service of the State of Alabama as a captain of light artillery, July 1, and regiments of veteran troops from the State of Alabama, to whom Congress has heretofore given ev[36 more...]
Chapter 4: The Alabama infantry regiments Brief history of each organization their seama regiment, an acting officer on my staff. Alabama never bore a braver son, and our country's caier-general, and since that time governor of Alabama; Col. Samuel Henry, Col. J. Horace King, Lieud of Gen. E. A. O'Neal, afterward governor of Alabama, fought during Sherman's campaign from Daltonle, General Withers commanding; department of Alabama and West Florida, commanded by General Bragg,le, General Withers commanding, department of Alabama and West Florida, Gen. Braxton Bragg, Februarigadier-general and twice elected governor of Alabama, a gallant officer who was wounded at Seven Pnigault, commanding Fourth brigade, says: The Alabama regiments partook in all attacks, as my reporanding brigade: The blood of her sons attests Alabama's chivalry and manhood. (206) Effective totath Carolina regiments and replacing them with Alabama regiments, so that the brigade comprised the [34 more...]
al Martin's division, and will proceed to northern Alabama. On his arrival at the Tennessee river, a scouting expedition to the northern part of Alabama. No. 73—(906) Mentioned in General Roussea3, 94-In Armistead's brigade, district of Central Alabama, to December, 1864. No. 103—(281) Menteptember 20th: Protection no longer needed in Alabama. Regiment ordered toward Nashville to cooperMobile at Pascagoula. Fifteenth battalion, Alabama cavalry, also called First battalion, merged nt as above. The Twenty-Fourth battalion, Alabama Cavalry. The Twenty-fourth battalion of cn, to be known as the Twenty-fifth battalion, Alabama cavalry: Capt. M. E. Johnston's, Capt. F. E. command of Maj. Joseph Hardie, and served in Alabama and Georgia. Hardie's company is mentioned ieral Maury's army, serving in central and northern Alabama. It was paroled at Iuka, May 18, 1865. Warrenton, February 17, 1865. Companies of Alabama cavalry. In addition to the regiments and [76 more.
Chapter 6: Batteries composed of Alabama troops their organization and officers Records from the No. 78—(791, 811 , 887) With General Adams, central Alabama, August and September, 1864. No. 79—(865) With Maj.nt, August 29th. No. 57—(484) Battalion Twenty, Alabama artillery, under Major Waddell, ordered to report t1. (693-695) Lost 7 men at Chickamauga. Raised in Alabama, by Capt. R. E. Rodes, as infantry, served since Ap ordered to Gadsden, and served in northern and central Alabama and Georgia. Part of it was engaged near Rome, 78—(791, 811, 887) In district of Central and Northern Alabama, General Adams, August and September, 1864. ams' command, October 31st. No. 94—(634) In central Alabama, Clanton's brigade, December 1, 1864. No. 10 battery, Capt. John J. Ward, was recruited in northern Alabama, and served with the army of Mississippi untils name. It was composed only partially of men from Alabama. Extracts from official war Recor
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Battles of the armies in Virginia in which Alabama troops were engaged. (search)
lellan, 42,000; loss 468 k, 1442 w, 373 m. Alabama troops, 4th, 5th, 6tb, 8th, 9th, 10th, 12th, . Shields, 2,500; loss 67 k, 393 w, 558 m. Alabama troops, 15th Inf. Oak Grove, Va., June 25., Gen. Hooker; loss 210 k, 1513 w, 1130 m. Alabama troops, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 14th, 44th, 5thlan, 105,445; loss 1734 k, 8062 w, 6053 m. Alabama troops, same as at Mechanicsville. Cedar M. D. S. Miles; loss .4 k, 173 w, 12,520 m. Alabama troops, 3d, 5th, 6th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 1an, 87,000; loss 2661 k, 11704 w, 13491 m. Alabama troops, same as at Antietam. Shepherdstowne, 101,679; loss 3072 k, 14,497 w, 5434 m. Alabama troops, same as at Antietam. Funkstown, MdFederal, Gen. Meade; loss 14 k, 77 w, 6 m. Alabama troops, 3d, 5th, 6th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 18 to 20.—Federal, loss 103 k, 796 w, 49 m. Alabama troops, 41st, 43d, 59th, 60th, 23d Battn. Ineral, Gen. Kautz; loss 49 k, 253 w, 156 m. Alabama troops, 4th, 15th, 44th, 47th, 48th Inf. D[71 more...]
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Battles of the Western army in which Albama troops were engaged. (search)
8.—Federal, Gen. Granger; total loss 320. Alabama troops, 1st, 3d, 4th, 51st Cav., and 1st, 3d,; total loss 20.—Fed— eral, total loss 40. Alabama troops, parts of 1st, 3d, 4th, 51st Cav., and; total loss 14.— Federal, total loss 200. Alabama troops, parts of 1st, 3d, 8th, 10th Conf. Caler; total loss 7.—Federal, total loss 65. Alabama troops, Wheeler's Cav. Buckhead Rd., Ga.,r; total loss 18.— Federal, total loss 45. Alabama troops, parts of the 1st, 3d, 51st Cav., and r; total loss 17.— Federal, total loss 80. Alabama troops, parts of the 1st, 3d, 51st Cav., and r; total loss 12. —Federal, total loss 35. Alabama troops, parts of 1st, 3d, 51st Cav., and 3d, r; total loss 13.— Federal, total loss 45. Alabama troops, parts of 1st, 3d, 51st Cav., and 3d, er; total loss 17.—Federal, total loss 25. Alabama troops, parts of 1st, 3d, 51st Cav., and 3d, ; total loss 157.—Federal, total loss 395. Alabama troops, parts of 1st, 3d, 51st Cav., and 3d,
. While living there he was elected major of Alabama militia. In 1834 he was in the Creek nation of the State, showed the high esteem in which Alabama held this gallant soldier and honored citizenere until the autumn of 1859, when he went to Alabama and, settling at Tallassee, engaged in cottonfter spending some time there he went back to Alabama and resided in Montgomery, where his wife dieather was, however, at that time a citizen of Alabama, living in Chambers county, and the family solonial officer in 1776. His parents moved to Alabama and settled at Greensboro in 1833. That same and elected in 1858. When, in 1861, the State of Alabama seceded he was prompt to offer his servic his father's trade. After the secession of Alabama, but before hostilities had actually commencea he remained there a year, and, returning to Alabama, resumed his business as contractor and build Alabama and Mississippi brigade, Manigault's Alabama and South Carolina brigade. He led this divi[57 more...]