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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1,742 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 1,016 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 996 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 516 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 274 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 180 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 172 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 164 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 142 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 130 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 21, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Alabama (Alabama, United States) or search for Alabama (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 5 document sections:

, of Virginia. This gentleman has been in the South since the commencement of the secession movement. I noticed his venerable face in the Sovereign Convention almost every day. Since the adjournment of that body he has been through Florida and Alabama, and I believe remained in Tallahassee and Montgomery until after the passage of the Ordinance of Secession. By way of recreation he visited the fortifications of the harbor on this occasion. As a companion and pleasant talker, I have met entitled from the importance of the subject and the distinguished source from which they have emanated. Your, very respectfully, James Buchanan. Opposed to coercion. The New York World contains a letter from Hon. Henry W. Hilliard, of Alabama, from which the following is an extract: "Now that some of the States have dissolved their connection with the Union, force is not to be employed against them. The whole theory of our government is opposed to it. Force may be employed aga
nce, a dispatch, signed by numerous secessionists in Congress, has been sent thither, their friends urging them by all means to avoid a collision with the Federal forces. There seems to be no danger, therefore, of an immediate conflict in that quarter. Col. Hayne, of S. C., will remain in Washington ten days or two weeks longer. His visit has been productive of great good in the interest of peace. It is not apprehended that any attack will at present be made on Fort Sumter. The Alabama members of Congress await instructions from their State. Those from Georgia will remain until they receive an official copy of the Ordinance of Secession. Active measures are in progress to have the course of Virginia, in sending Commissioners to Washington on the 4th of February, responded to by similar movements in all the States. Dispatches have been sent to Harrisburg, Pa.; Albany, N. Y.; Columbus, Ohio, and other State Capitals where Legislatures are in session, urging the promp
M. C.'s in town --Hon. John H. Reagan, of Texas, was at the Exchange Hotel on Friday night, and left on Saturday morning for home. Hon. D. C. Dejarnette, of this District, left Richmond for Washington Saturday evening. Hon. John L. Landrum, of Louisiana, was in the city on Saturday. Hon. Jas. A. Stallworth, of Alabama, was at the Exchange Hotel yesterday, on his way home from Washington.
Abandoned the service. --Lieut. J. H. Forney, of the 10th infantry, U. S. A., passed through Richmond, a day or two since, on the way to his home in Alabama, having resigned his commission when that State seceded.
Alabama--the Popular secession vote. Official returns from all but five counties in Alabama of the vote cast for Delegates to the State Convention, show the following result, viz: Immediate Secession35,776 Co-operation26,286 Majority for immediate secession9,100 Compared with the Presidential, the falling ofAlabama of the vote cast for Delegates to the State Convention, show the following result, viz: Immediate Secession35,776 Co-operation26,286 Majority for immediate secession9,100 Compared with the Presidential, the falling off in the aggregate vote is about 22,000, which amount, of course, is reduced by the returns from the five counties not heard from. The secessionists claim that their majority would have been increased by the increased vote. --Nor is it reasonable to conclude that co-operationists are not secessionists. They were most of them in fm that their majority would have been increased by the increased vote. --Nor is it reasonable to conclude that co-operationists are not secessionists. They were most of them in favor of seceding when four States had seceded. But Alabama makes the fourth out of the Union, and so the co-operationists have not much to complain of.