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Polybius, Histories 84 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 42 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 8 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 8 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan) 8 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 4 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 4 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Art of Love, Remedy of Love, Art of Beauty, Court of Love, History of Love, Amours (ed. various) 2 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 2 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Miles Gloriosus, or The Braggart Captain (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 2 0 Browse Search
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Aeschylus, Libation Bearers (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.), line 602 (search)
Chorus Let whoever is not flighty in his wits know this, when he has learned of the device of a lit brand contrived by Thestius' heartless daughter:When Meleager, the child of Althaea, who was daughter of Thestius, king of Aetolia, and wife to Oeneus of Calydon, was a week old, the Fates appeared to the mother and declared that he would die when the brand on the hearth was consumed. Whereupon Althaea took the brand and put it in a chest; but when Meleager, grown to youthful manhood, slew her brothers, she threw it into the fire, and her son died suddenly.she destroyed her own child by burning the charred brand of the same age as he when, coming from his mother's womb, he cried out, and it aged in pace with him through his lifeto the day decreed by fate.
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 1 (search)
h or, as some say, by Iphianassa, a son Aetolus, who slew Apis, son of Phoroneus, and fled to the Curetian country. There he killed his hosts, Dorus and Laodocus and Polypoetes, the sons of Phthia and Apollo, and called the country Aetolia after himself.Compare Paus. 5.1.8; Conon 14. Aetolus and Pronoe, daughter of Phorbus, had sons, Pleuron and Calydon, after whom the cities in Aetolia were named. Pleuron wedded Xanthippe, daughter of Dorus, and begat a son AAetolia were named. Pleuron wedded Xanthippe, daughter of Dorus, and begat a son Agenor, and daughters, Sterope and Stratonice and Laophonte. Calydon and Aeolia, daughter of Amythaon, had daughters, Epicaste and Protogenia, who had Oxylus by Ares. And Agenor, son of Pleuron, married Epicaste, daughter of Calydon, and begat Porthaon and Demonice, who had Evenus, Molus, Pylus, and Thestius by Ares. Evenus begat Marpessa, who was wooed by Apollo, but Idas, son of Aphareus, carried her off in a winged chariot which he received fr
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
Three-Eyed One. So they banished Hippotes, and sought for the Three-Eyed One.With this and what follows compare Paus. 5.3.5ff.; Suidas, s.v. *trio/fqalmos; and as to Oxylus, compare Strab. 8.3.33. Pausanias calls Oxylus the son of Haemon. And they chanced to light on Oxylus, son of Andraemon, a man sitting on a one-eyed horse ( its other eye having been knocked out with an arrow); for he had fled to Elis on account of a murder, and was now returning from there to Aetolia after the lapse of a year.The homicide is said to have been accidental; according to one account, the victim was the homicide's brother. See Paus. 5.3.7. As to the banishment of a murderer for a year, see note on Apollod. 2.5.11. So guessing the purport of the oracle, they made him their guide. And having engaged the enemy they got the better of him both by land and sea, and slew Tisamenus, son of Orestes.Pausanias gives a different account of the death
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
he time of his madness Alcmaeon begat two children, Amphilochus and a daughter Tisiphone, by Manto, daughter of Tiresias, and that he brought the babes to Corinth and gave them to Creon, king of Corinth, to bring up; and that on account of her extraordinary comeliness Tisiphone was sold as a slave by Creon's spouse, who feared that Creon might make her his wedded wife. But Alcmaeon bought her and kept her as a handmaid, not knowing that she was his daughter, and coming to Corinth to get back his children he recovered his son also. And Amphilochus colonized Amphilochian Argos in obedience to oracles of Apollo.Amphilochian Argos was a city of Aetolia, situated on the Ambracian Gulf. See Thuc. 2.68.3, who represents the founder Amphilochus as the son of Amphiaraus, and therefore as the brother, not the son, of Alcmaeon. As to Amphilochus, son of Amphiaraus, see above, Apollod. 3.7.2.
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
of the slain suitors rose in revolt against Ulysses; but Neoptolemus, being invited by both parties to act as arbitrator, sentenced Ulysses to banishment for bloodshed, and condemned the friends and relatives of the suitors to pay an annual compensation to Ulysses for the damage they had done to his property. The sentence obliged Ulysses to withdraw not only from Ithaca, but also from Cephallenia and Zacynthus; and he retired to Italy. The compensation exacted from the heirs of the suitors was paid in kind, and consisted of barley groats, wine, honey, olive oil, and animal victims of mature age. This payment Ulysses ordered to be made to his son Telemachus. and that Ulysses went to Aetolia, to Thoas, son of Andraemon, married the daughter of Thoas, and leaving a son Leontophonus, whom he had by her,These last recorded doings of Ulysses appear to be mentioned by no other ancient writer. died in old age.
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XII, Chapter 60 (search)
y confused. They should be L. Pinarius Mamercinus Rufus, L. Furius Medullinus Fusus, and Sp. Postumius Albus Regillensis. This year the Athenians chose Demosthenes general and sent him forth with thirty ships and an adequate body of soldiers. He added to his force fifteen ships from the Cercyraeans and soldiers from the Cephallenians, Acarnanians, and the Messenians in Naupactus, and then sailed to Leucas. After ravaging the territory of the Leucadians he sailed to Aetolia and plundered many of its villages. But the Aetolians rallied to oppose him and there was a battle in which the Athenians were defeated, whereupon they withdrew to Naupactus. The Aetolians, elated by their victory, after adding to their army three thousand Lacedaemonian soldiers, marched upon Naupactus, which was inhabited at the time by Messenians, but were beaten off. After this they marched upon the city called MolycriaAbout five miles south-west of N
Euripides, Phoenissae (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 960 (search)
warnings; for he will tell all this to our rulers and generals [going to the seven gates and the captains]; now if we can forestall him, you are saved, but if you are too late, we are ruined and you will die. Menoeceus Where can I escape? To what city? To which of our guest-friends? Creon Where you will be furthest removed from this land. Menoeceus It is for you to name a place, for me to carry out your bidding. Creon After passing Delphi— Menoeceus Where must I go, father? Creon To Aetolia. Menoeceus And where must I go from there? Creon To the land of Thesprotia. Menoeceus To Dodona's holy threshold? Creon You understand. Menoeceus What protection will I find there? Creon The god will send you on your way. Menoeceus How shall I find the means? Creon I will supply you with money. Menoeceus A good plan of yours, father. Go now; for I will come to your sister, Jocasta, at whose breast I was suckled when bereft of my mother, a lonely orphan, [to give her greeting and t
Euripides, The Suppliants (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 1196 (search)
all this, dismiss the dead from your land. And to the god resign as sacred land the spot where their bodies were purified by fire, there by the meeting of the triple roads that lead to the Isthmus. Thus much to you, Theseus, I address; next to the sons of Argos I speak: when you are young men, the town beside Ismenus shall you sack, avenging the slaughter of your dead fathers; you too, Aegialeus, shall take your father's place and in your youth command the army, and with you, marching from Aetolia, Tydeus' son, whom his father named Diomedes. As soon as the beards overshadow your cheeks you must lead an armed Danaid army against the battlements of Thebes with sevenfold gates. For to their sorrow shall you come like lion's whelps in full-grown might to sack their city. No otherwise is it to be; and you shall be a theme for minstrels' songs in days to come, known through Hellas as “the After-born”; so famous shall your expedition be, thanks to the god. Theseus Lady Athena, I will he
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 6, chapter 127 (search)
From Italy came Smindyrides of Sybaris, son of Hippocrates, the most luxurious liver of his day (and Sybaris was then at the height of its prosperity), and Damasus of Siris, son of that Amyris who was called the Wise. These came from Italy; from the Ionian Gulf, Amphimnestus son of Epistrophus, an Epidamnian; he was from the Ionian Gulf. From Aetolia came Males, the brother of that Titormus who surpassed all the Greeks in strength, and fled from the sight of men to the farthest parts of the Aetolian land. From the Peloponnese came Leocedes, son of Phidon the tyrant of Argos, that Phidon who made weights and measures for the PeloponnesiansP. introduced the “Aeginetan” system of weights and measures. For the chronological difficulty connected with this mention of him, see the commentators. and acted more arrogantly than any other Greek; he drove out the Elean contest-directors and held the contests at Olympia himself. This man's son now came, and Amiantus, an Arcadian from Trapezus, so
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Attica, chapter 26 (search)
into the Museum; and when he fell fighting, the Athenians did him great honor, dedicating his shield to Zeus of Freedom and in scribing on it the name of Leocritus and his exploit. This is the greatest achievement of Olympiodorus, not to mention his success in recovering Peiraeus and Munychia; and again, when the Macedonians were raiding Eleusis he collected a force of Eleusinians and defeated the invaders. Still earlier than this, when Cassander had invaded Attica, Olympiodorus sailed to Aetolia and induced the Aetolians to help. This allied force was the main reason why the Athenians escaped war with Cassander. Olympiodorus has not only honors at Athens, both on the Acropolis and in the town hall but also a portrait at Eleusis. The Phocians too of Elatea dedicated at Delphi a bronze statue of Olympiodorus for help in their revolt from Cassander. Near the statue of Olympiodorus stands a bronze image of Artemis surnamed Leucophryne, dedicated by the sons of Themistocles; for the
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