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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Polybius, Histories 84 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 42 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 8 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 8 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan) 8 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 4 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 4 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 2 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler). You can also browse the collection for Aetolia (Greece) or search for Aetolia (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 4, line 349 (search)
nded among so many, but challenged them to contests of all kinds, and in each one of them was at once victorious, so mightily did Athena help him. The Cadmeans were incensed at his success, and set a force of fifty youths with two leaders - the godlike hero Maion, son of Haimon, and Polyphontes, son of Autophonos - at their head, to lie in wait for him on his return journey; but Tydeus slew every man of them, save only Maion, whom he let go in obedience to heaven's omens. Such was Tydeus of Aetolia. His son can talk more glibly, but he cannot fight as his father did." Diomedes made no answer, for he was shamed by the rebuke of Agamemnon; but the son of Kapaneus took up his words and said, "Son of Atreus, tell no lies, for you can speak truth if you will. We boast ourselves as even better men than our fathers; we took seven-gated Thebes, though the wall was stronger and our men were fewer in number, for we trusted in the omens of the gods and in the help of Zeus, whereas they peris
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler), Scroll 4, line 446 (search)
nkle of his right leg. He that hurled it was Peirous, son of Imbrasos, leader of the Thracians, who had come from Ainos; the bones and both the tendons were crushed by the pitiless stone. He fell to the ground on his back, and in his death throes stretched out his hands towards his comrades. But Peirous, who had wounded him, sprang on him and thrust a spear into his belly, so that his bowels came gushing out upon the ground, and darkness veiled his eyes. As he was leaving the body, Thoas of Aetolia struck him in the chest near the nipple, and the point fixed itself in his lungs. Thoas came close up to him, pulled the spear out of his chest, and then drawing his sword, smote him in the middle of the belly so that he died; but he did not strip him of his armor, for his Thracian comrades, men who wear their hair in a tuft at the top of their heads, stood round the body and kept him off with their long spears for all his great stature and valor; so he was driven back. Thus the two corpses