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Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 132 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 126 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 114 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 88 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 68 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 32 0 Browse Search
Lycurgus, Speeches 20 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 12 0 Browse Search
P. Terentius Afer (Terence), Andria: The Fair Andrian (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 12 0 Browse Search
P. Terentius Afer (Terence), The Eunuch (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Lycurgus, Speeches. You can also browse the collection for Attica (Greece) or search for Attica (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 10 results in 8 document sections:

Lycurgus, Against Leocrates, section 21 (search)
To resume then, gentlemen. After this, time passed, merchant ships from Athens continued to arrive at Rhodes, and it was clear that no disaster had overtaken the city. So Leocrates grew alarmed, and embarking again, left Rhodes for Megara. He stayed at Megara for over five years with a Megarian as his patron, unashamed at living on the boundaries of Attica, an alien on the borders of the land that nurtured him.
Lycurgus, Against Leocrates, section 85 (search)
But a Delphian Cleomantis, learning of the oracle, secretly told the Athenians. Such, it seems, was the goodwill which our ancestors always inspired even among aliens. And when the Pelopannesians invaded Attica, what did our ancestors do, gentlemen of the jury? They did not desert their country and retire as Leocrates did, nor surrender to the enemy the land that reared them and its temples. No. Though they were few in number, shut inside the walls, they endured the hardships of a siege to preserve their country.
Lycurgus, Against Leocrates, section 108 (search)
They are fine lines, gentlemen, and a lesson too for those who wish to heed them. Such was the courage of the men who used to hear them that they disputed with our city for supremacy; no matter for surprise, since the most gallant feats had been performed by either people. Your ancestors defeated the barbarians who first set foot in Attica, demonstrating clearly the superiority of valor over wealth and courage over numbers. The Spartans took the field at Thermopylae, and, though their fortune was less happy, in bravery they far surpassed all rivals.
Lycurgus, Against Leocrates, section 113 (search)
They decreed publicly, on the motion of Critias, that the dead man should be tried for treason, and that if it were found that this was a tratior who had been buried in the country, his bones should be dug up and removed from Attica,A law existed to the effect that a man condemned for treason should not be buried in Attica (see Xen. Hell. 1.7.22). so that the land should not have lying in it even the bones of one who had betrayed his country and his city. They decreed publicly, on the motion of Critias, that the dead man should be tried for treason, and that if it were found that this was a tratior who had been buried in the country, his bones should be dug up and removed from Attica,A law existed to the effect that a man condemned for treason should not be buried in Attica (see Xen. Hell. 1.7.22). so that the land should not have lying in it even the bones of one who had betrayed his country and hi
Lycurgus, Against Leocrates, section 115 (search)
You hear this decree, gentlemen. After it was passed your ancestors dug up the traitor's bones and cast them out of Attica; they killed his defenders, Aristarchus and Alexicles, and even refused them burial in the country. Will you then, who have the very person who has betrayed the city alive and at the mercy of your vote, let him go unpunished?
Lycurgus, Against Leocrates, section 120 (search)
Let the jury hear the other decree, clerk, relating to the men who withdrew to DeceleaDecelea, a town in the North of Attica, was occupied by the Peloponnesians in 413 B.C. and therefore served as a haven for deserters from Athens. Lycurgus seems to be the only writer who mentions this decree. when the people were besieged by the Spartans, so that they will realize that the punishments inflicted by our ancestors on traitors were uniform and self-consistent. Read it.Decree
Lycurgus, Against Leocrates, section 121 (search)
You hear this decree too, gentlemen. It says that they condemned any who moved to Decelea in war-time and laid it down that those who were caught returning should be led by any Athenian who cared to do so to the Thesmothetae who should take them into custody and hand them over to the executioner.Literally: “the man in charge of the pit.” to\ o)/rugma is the same as to\ ba/raqron, the cleft into which criminals at Athens were thrown. If they dealt thus with men who merely changed their place in Attica, how will you treat Leocrates who in wartime fled from his city and his country to Rhodes and deserted the state? Will you not kill him? If you do not, how can you pass as the descendants of those m
Lycurgus, Against Leocrates, section 145 (search)
By such means you will grant to all who wish it the power to injure the state and yourselves whether by word or deed. This is no simple matter of an exile's coming back; the deserter of his city, who condemned himself to banishment and lived for more than five or six years in Megara with a sponsor, is now at large in Attica and in the city. It means that one who openly gave his vote for abandoning Attica to be a sheep-walk is in this country resident among you. By such means you will grant to all who wish it the power to injure the state and yourselves whether by word or deed. This is no simple matter of an exile's coming back; the deserter of his city, who condemned himself to banishment and lived for more than five or six years in Megara with a sponsor, is now at large in Attica and in the city. It means that one who openly gave his vote for abandoning Attica to be a sheep-walk is in this country resident among you.