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Polybius, Histories 64 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan) 16 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 12 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 10 0 Browse Search
Sextus Propertius, Elegies (ed. Vincent Katz) 6 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 6 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Georgics (ed. J. B. Greenough) 4 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 4 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 4 0 Browse Search
Lycurgus, Speeches 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More). You can also browse the collection for Epirus (Greece) or search for Epirus (Greece) in all documents.

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P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 8, line 260 (search)
nd oil of olives to the golden haired Minerva. Thus, the Gods were all adored, beginning with the lowest to the highest, except alone Diana, and of all the Gods her altars only were neglected. No frankincense unto her was given! Neglect enrages even Deities. “Am I to suffer this indignity?” she cried, “Though I am thus dishonored, I will not be unrevenged!” And so the boar was sent to ravage the fair land of Calydon. And this avenging boar was quite as large as bulls now feeding on the green Epirus, and larger than the bulls of Sicily. A dreadful boar.—His burning, bloodshot eyes seemed coals of living fire, and his rough neck was knotted with stiff muscles, and thick-set with bristles like sharp spikes. A seething froth dripped on his shoulders, and his tusks were like the spoils of Ind. Discordant roars reverberated from his hideous jaws; and lightning—belched forth from his horrid throat— scorched the green fields. He trampled the green corn and doomed the farmer to lament hi
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 13, line 705 (search)
gdom of the shrewd deceitful man, Ulysses; and they reached Ambracia, contended for by those disputing gods; which is today renowned abroad, because of Actian Apollo, and the stone seen there conspicuous as a transformed judge; they saw Dodona, vocal with its oaks; and also, the well known Chaonian bays, where sons of the Molossian king escaped with wings attached, from unavailing flames. They set their sails then for the neighboring land of the Phaeacians, rich with luscious fruit: then for Epirus and to Buthrotos, and came then to a mimic town of Troy, ruled by the Phrygian seer. With prophecies which Helenus, the son of Priam, gave, they came to Sicily, whose three high capes jut outward in the sea. Of these three points Pachynos faces towards the showery south; and Lilybaeum is exposed to soft delicious zephyrs; but Peloros looks out towards the Bears which never touch the sea. The Trojans came there. Favored by the tide, and active oars, by nightfall all the fleet arrived together