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Polybius, Histories 64 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan) 16 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 12 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 10 0 Browse Search
Sextus Propertius, Elegies (ed. Vincent Katz) 6 0 Browse Search
Epictetus, Works (ed. George Long) 6 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Georgics (ed. J. B. Greenough) 4 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 4 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 4 0 Browse Search
Lycurgus, Speeches 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams). You can also browse the collection for Epirus (Greece) or search for Epirus (Greece) in all documents.

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P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams), Book 3, line 278 (search)
So, safe at land, our hopeless peril past, we offered thanks to Jove, and kindled high his altars with our feast and sacrifice; then, gathering on Actium's holy shore, made fair solemnities of pomp and game. My youth, anointing their smooth, naked limbs, wrestled our wonted way. For glad were we, who past so many isles of Greece had sped and 'scaped our circling foes. Now had the sun rolled through the year's full circle, and the waves were rough with icy winter's northern gales. I hung for trophy on that temple door a swelling shield of brass (which once was worn by mighty Abas) graven with this line: SPOIL OF AENEAS FROM TRIUMPHANT FOES. Then from that haven I command them forth; my good crews take the thwarts, smiting the sea with rival strokes, and skim the level main. Soon sank Phaeacia's wind-swept citadels out of our view; we skirted the bold shores of proud Epirus, in Chaonian land, and made Buthrotum's port and towering town.
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams), Book 3, line 472 (search)
Hector's wife. Take these last offerings of those who are thy kin—O thou that art of my Astyanax in all this world the only image! His thy lovely eyes! Thy hands, thy lips, are even what he bore, and like thy own his youthful bloom would be.” Thus I made answer, turning to depart with rising tears: “Live on, and be ye blessed, whose greatness is accomplished! As for me, from change to change Fate summons, and I go; but ye have won repose. No leagues of sea await your cleaving keel. Not yours the quest of fading Italy's delusive shore. Here a new Xanthus and a second Troy your labor fashioned and your eyes may see— more blest, I trust, less tempting to our foes! If e'er on Tiber and its bordering vales I safely enter, and these eyes behold our destined walls, then in fraternal bond let our two nations live, whose mutual boast is one Dardanian blood, one common story. Epirus with Hesperia shall be one Troy in heart and soul. But this remains for our sons' sons the happy task and