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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 28 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 8 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 8 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 4 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 2 0 Browse Search
Plato, Laws 2 0 Browse Search
Lysias, Speeches 2 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 2 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese) 2 0 Browse Search
Aeschylus, Agamemnon (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aeschines, Speeches. You can also browse the collection for Athos (Greece) or search for Athos (Greece) in all documents.

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Aeschines, Against Ctesiphon, section 132 (search)
Wherefore what is there, strange and unexpected, that has not happened in our time!Athens and Thebes, in the old days god-fearing states of Hellas, have refused the service due the Delphic god, and have suffered every disaster; Philip, the barbarian, undertook the service of the god, and has received as his reward unheard-of power. For it is not the life of men we have lived, but we were born to be a tale of wonder to posterity. Is not the king of the Persians—he who channelled Athos, he who bridged the Hellespont, he who demanded earth and water of the Greeks, he who dared to write in his letters that he was lord of all men from the rising of the sun unto its setting—is he not struggling now, no longer for lordship over others, but already for his life?The Persian king was already dead when this speech was delivered, but the news had not yet reached Athens. And do we not see this glory and the leadership against the Persians bestowed on the same men who liberated the temple of Delph