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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 6 0 Browse Search
Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White) 6 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Bacchae (ed. T. A. Buckley) 4 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 4 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 2 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 2 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 2 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 2 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 2 0 Browse Search
Hesiod, Shield of Heracles 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley). You can also browse the collection for Pieria (Greece) or search for Pieria (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 4, chapter 195 (search)
is full of olives and vines. It is said that there is a lake on this island from which the maidens of the country draw gold-dust out of the mud on feathers smeared with pitch. I do not know whether this is true; I just write what is said. But all things are possible; for I myself saw pitch drawn from the water of a pool in Zacynthus. The pools there are numerous; the greatest of them is seventy feet long and broad, and twelve feet deep. Into this they drop a pole with a myrtle branch fastened to its end, and bring up pitch on the myrtle, smelling like asphalt, and for the rest better than the pitch of Pieria. Then they pour it into a pit that they have dug near the pool; and when a fair amount is collected there, they fill their vessels from the pit. Whatever falls into the pool is carried under the ground and appears again in the sea, which is about a half a mile distant from the pool. So, then, the story that comes from the island lying off the Libyan coast is like the truth, too.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 7, chapter 131 (search)
Xerxes stayed for many days in the region of Pieria while a third part of his army was clearing a road over the Macedonian mountains so that the whole army might pass by that way to the Perrhaebian country. Now it was that the heralds who had been sent to Hellas to demand earth, some empty-handed, some bearing earth and water, returned.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 7, chapter 177 (search)
These places, then, were thought by the Greeks to suit their purpose. After making a thorough survey, they concluded that the barbarians could not make use of their entire army, nor of their horsemen. They therefore resolved, that they would meet the invader of Hellas here. Then, when they heard that the Persian was in Pieria, they broke up from the Isthmus and set out with their army to Thermopylae and with their fleet to Artemisium.