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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 6 0 Browse Search
Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White) 6 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Bacchae (ed. T. A. Buckley) 4 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 4 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 2 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 2 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 2 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 2 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 2 0 Browse Search
Hesiod, Shield of Heracles 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War. You can also browse the collection for Pieria (Greece) or search for Pieria (Greece) in all documents.

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Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War, Book 2, chapter 99 (search)
imiots, and other tribes more inland, though Macedonians by blood and allies and, dependents of their kindred, still have their own separate governments. The country on the sea coast, now called Macedonia, was first acquired by Alexander, the father of Perdiccas, and his ancestors, originally Temenids from Argos. This was effected by the expulsion from Pieria of the Pierians, who afterwards inhabited Phagres and other places under Mount Pangaeus, beyond the Strymon (indeed the country between Pangaeus and the sea is still called the Pierian gulf) of the Bottiaeans, at present neighbors of the Chalcidians, from Bottia, and by the acquisition in Paeonia of a narrow strip along the river Axius extending to Pella and the sea; the
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War, Book 2, chapter 100 (search)
Philip's government, and took Idomene by assault, Gortynia, Atalanta, and some other places by negotiation, these last coming over for love of Philip's son, Amyntas, then with Sitalces. Laying siege to Europus, and failing to take it, he next advanced into the rest of Macedonia to the left of Pella and Cyrrhus, not proceeding beyond this into Bottia and Pieria, but staying to lay waste Mygdonia, Crestonia, and Anthemus. The Macedonians never even thought of meeting him with infantry; but the Thracian host was, as opportunity offered, attacked by handfuls of their horse, which had been reinforced from their allies in the interior. Armed with cuirasses, and excellent horsemen, wherever these charged they overthrew all before them, bu