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Pausanias, Description of Greece 64 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 46 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 32 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 28 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 12 0 Browse Search
Plato, Laws 6 0 Browse Search
Demades, On the Twelve Years 4 0 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 2 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Minor Works (ed. E. C. Marchant, G. W. Bowersock, tr. Constitution of the Athenians.) 2 0 Browse Search
Lysias, Speeches 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley). You can also browse the collection for Laconia (Greece) or search for Laconia (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 6 document sections:

Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 1, chapter 69 (search)
ngers to Sparta with gifts to ask for an alliance, having instructed them what to say. They came and said: “Croesus, King of Lydia and other nations, has sent us with this message: ‘Lacedaemonians, the god has declared that I should make the Greek my friend; now, therefore, since I learn that you are the leaders of Hellas, I invite you, as the oracle bids; I would like to be your friend and ally, without deceit or guile.’” Croesus proposed this through his messengers; and the Lacedaemonians, who had already heard of the oracle given to Croesus, welcomed the coming of the Lydians and swore to be his friends and allies; and indeed they were obliged by certain benefits which they had received before from the king. For the Lacedaemonians had sent to Sardis to buy gold, intending to use it for the statue of Apollo which now stands on ThornaxA mountain north-east of Sparta, overlooking the Eurotas valley. in Laconia; and Croesus, when they offered to buy it, made them a free gift
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 3, chapter 56 (search)
So when the Lacedaemonians had besieged Samos for forty days with no success, they went away to the Peloponnesus. There is a foolish tale abroad that Polycrates bribed them to depart by making and giving them a great number of gilded lead coins, as a native currency. This was the first expedition to Asia made by Dorians of Lacedaemon.Not the first expedition, that is, made by any inhabitants of Laconia, Achaeans from that country having taken part in the Trojan war.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 4, chapter 145 (search)
n; after being driven out of Lemnos by them, they sailed away to Lacedaemon, and there camped on Teügetum and kindled a fire. Seeing it, the Lacedaemonians sent a messenger to inquire who they were and where they came from. They answered the messenger that they were Minyae, descendants of the heroes who had sailed in the Argo and put in at Lemnos and there begot their race. Hearing the story of the lineage of the Minyae, the Lacedaemonians sent a second time and asked why they had come into Laconia and kindled a fire. They replied that, having been expelled by the Pelasgians, they had come to the land of their fathers, as was most just; and their wish was to live with their fathers' people, sharing in their rights and receiving allotted pieces of land. The Lacedaemonians were happy to receive the MinyaeAs descendants of the Argonauts, who were Minyae of Thessaly, living near the Pagasaean gulf. on the terms which their guests desired; the chief cause of their consenting was that the T
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 6, chapter 58 (search)
The kings are granted these rights from the Spartan commonwealth while they live; when they die, their rights are as follows: Horsemen proclaim their death in all parts of Laconia, and in the city women go about beating on cauldrons. When this happens, two free persons from each house, a man and a woman, are required to wear mourning, or incur heavy penalties if they fail to do so. The Lacedaemonians have the same custom at the deaths of their kings as the foreigners in Asia; most foreigners use the same custom at their kings' deaths. When a king of the Lacedaemonians dies, a fixed number of their subject neighbors must come to the funeral from all Lacedaemon, besides the Spartans. When these and the helots and the Spartans themselves have assembled in one place to the number of many thousands, together with the women, they zealously beat their foreheads and make long and loud lamentation, calling that king that is most recently dead the best of all their kings. Whenever a king dies
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 7, chapter 235 (search)
ans if Cythera were beneath the sea rather than above it. This he said because he expected that it would provide an opportunity for attack just as I am suggesting—not that he had any foreknowledge of your force, but he dreaded all men's forces alike. Let them then make that island their station and set out from there to strike fear into the Lacedaemonians. If these have a war of their own on their borders, you will have no cause to fear that they will send men to save the rest of Hellas from being overrun by your armies; furthermore, the enslavement of the rest of Hellas must weaken Laconia if it is left to stand alone. If, however, you do not do this, then expect what I will now tell you: a narrow isthmus leads to the Peloponnese; all the Peloponnesians will be banded together there against you, and you may expect battles more stubborn than those that you have fought already. But if you do as I have said, then you may have that isthmus and all their cities without striking a blow.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 9, chapter 11 (search)
nthia and celebrating, leaving your allies deserted. For the wrong that you do them and for lack of allies, the Athenians, will make their peace with the Persian as best they can, and thereafter, in so far as we will be king's allies, we will march with him against whatever land his men lead us. Then will you learn what the issue of this matter will be for you.” In response to this the ephors swore to them that they believed their army to be even now at Orestheum,Other references place Orestheum N.W. of Sparta, therefore hardly on the direct route to the Isthmus. marching against the “strangers,” as they called the barbarians. Having no knowledge of this, the envoys questioned them further as to the meaning of this and thereby learned the whole truth; they marvelled at this and hastened with all speed after the army. With them went five thousand men-at-arms of the Lacedaemonian countrymen.Inhabitants of the country districts of Laconia, not enjoying the full privileges of Spart