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Pausanias, Description of Greece 64 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 46 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 32 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 28 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 12 0 Browse Search
Plato, Laws 6 0 Browse Search
Demades, On the Twelve Years 4 0 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 2 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Minor Works (ed. E. C. Marchant, G. W. Bowersock, tr. Constitution of the Athenians.) 2 0 Browse Search
Lysias, Speeches 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Xenophon, Minor Works (ed. E. C. Marchant, G. W. Bowersock, tr. Constitution of the Athenians.). You can also browse the collection for Laconia (Greece) or search for Laconia (Greece) in all documents.

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Xenophon, Constitution of the Lacedaimonians (ed. E. C. Marchant, G. W. Bowersock, tr. Constitution of the Athenians.), chapter 15 (search)
ws of the state.” And this the oath of the state: “While you abide by your oath, we will keep the kingship unshaken.” These then are the honours that are bestowed on the King at home during his lifetime; and they do not greatly exceed those of private persons. For it was not the wish of Lycurgus to put into the King's hearts despotic pride, nor to implant in the mind of the citizens envy of their power. As for the honours assigned to the King at his death, the intention of the laws of Lycurgus herein is to show that they have preferred the Kings of the Lacedaemonians in honour not as mere men, but as demigods.Herodotus (6.58) gives details of these honours. The elaborate funeral obsequies were attended by a great concourse of men and women from all parts of Laconia. A man and a woman in every family were compelled to go into mourning. If a king died on foreign service his body was embalmed and brought home if possible; if not, an image of him, as in the case of Agesilaus, was b