hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 88 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 6 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 4 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 2 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 2 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 2 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation. You can also browse the collection for Cadiz (Spain) or search for Cadiz (Spain) in all documents.

Your search returned 44 results in 22 document sections:

1 2 3
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A briefe note concerning an ancient trade of the English Marchants to the Canarie-ilands, gathered out of an olde ligier booke of M. Nicolas Thorne the elder a worshipfull marchant of the city of Bristoll. (search)
factour Thomas Midnall, and his owne servant William Ballard at that time resident at S. Lucar in Andaluzia; that in the yeere of our Lord 1526 (and by all circumstances and probabilities long before) certaine English marchants, and among the rest himselfe with one Thomas Spacheford exercised usuall and ordinary trade of marchandise unto the Canarie Ilands. For by the sayd letter notice was given to Thomas Midnall and William Ballard aforesayd, that a certaine ship called The Christopher of Cadiz bound for the West Indies had taken in certaine fardels of cloth both course and fine, broad and narrow of divers sorts and colours, some arovas of packthreed, sixe cerons or bagges of sope with other goods of M. Nicolas Thorne, to be delivered at Santa Cruz the chiefe towne in Tenerifa one of the seven Canary-ilands. All which commodities the sayd Thomas and William were authorised by the owner in the letter before mentioned to barter & sell away at Santa Cruz. And in lieu of such mony as s
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A briefe relation of the notable service performed by Sir Francis Drake upon the Spanish Fleete prepared in the Road of Cadiz: and of his destroying of 100. saile of barks; Passing from thence all along the coast to Cape Sacre, where also hee tooke certaine Forts: and so to the mouth of the River of Lisbon, and thence crossing over to the Isle of Sant Michael, supprized a mighty Carack called the Sant Philip comming out of the East India, which was the first of that kinde that ever was seene in England: Performed in the yeere 1587. (search)
neth of April towards the coast of Spaine. The 16. of the said moneth we mette in the latitude of 40. degrees with two ships of Middleborough, which came from Cadiz ; by which we understood that there was great store of warlike provision at Cadiz & thereabout ready to come for Lisbon . Upon this information our Generall with Cadiz & thereabout ready to come for Lisbon . Upon this information our Generall with al speed possible, bending himselfe thither to cut off their said forces and provisions, upon the 19. of April entered with his Fleet into the Harbor of Cadiz: where at our first entring we were assailed over against the Towne by sixe Gallies, which notwithstanding in short time retired under their fortresse. There were in . at the least, being (in our judgement) about 10000. tunnes of shipping. There were in sight of us at Porto Real about 40. ships, besides those that fled from Cadiz . We found little ease during our aboad there, by reason of their continuall shooting from the Gallies, the for tresses, and from the shoare: where continually
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A true discourse written (as is thought) by Colonel Antonie Winkfield emploied in the voiage to Spaine and Portugall, 1589. sent to his particular friend, & by him published for the better satisfaction of all such as having bene seduced by particular report, have entred into conceits tending to the discredite of the enterprise and Actors of the same. (search)
urable cariage of himselfe towards all men doth make him highly esteemed at home; so did his exceeding forwardnesse in all services make him to be woondered at amongst us) who, I say, put off in the same winde from Falmouth, that we left Plimmouth in, where he lay, because he would avoid the importunity of messengers that were dayly sent for his returne, and some other causes more secret to himselfe, not knowing (as it seemed) what place the Generals purposed to land in, had bene as farre as Cadiz in Andaluzia, and lay up and downe about the South Cape, where he tooke some ships laden with corne, and brought them unto the fleet. Also in his returne from thence to meet with our fleet, he fell with the Ilands of Bayon; and on that side of the river which Cannas standeth upon, he, with Sir Roger Williams, and those Gentlemen that were with him went on shore, with some men out of the ship he was in, whom the enemy, that held guard upon that coast, would not abide, but fled up into the c
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A true report of the honourable service at Sea perfourmed by Sir John Burrough Knight, Lieutenant generall of the fleet prepared by the honor. Sir Walter Ralegh Knight, Lord warden of the Stanneries of Cornwall and Devon . Wherin chiefly the Santa Clara of Biscay, a ship of 600 tunnes was taken, and the two East Indian caraks, the Santa Cruz and the Madre de Dios were forced, the one burnt, and the other taken and brought into Dartmouth the seventh of September, 1592. (search)
ed, and after sent for England, our fleet coasted along towards the Southcape of S. Vincent, and by the way, about the Rocke nere Lisbon , sir John Burrough in the Robucke spying a saile afarre off, gave her present chase; which being a flieboat and of good saile, drew him farre Southwards before he could fetch her; but at last she came under his lee and strooke saile. The master of which flieboat comming aboord him, confessed that the king indeed had prepared a great fleet in S. Lucar and Cadiz , and (as the report in Spaine was currant) for the West Indies. But in deed the Spanish king had provided this fleet upon this counsel. He received intelligence, that sir Walter Ralegh was to put out strong for the West India: to impeach him, and to ranconter his force he appointed this fleet; although looking for the arrivall of his East Indian caraks, he first ordained those ships to waft them from the Acores . But perswading himseife, that if the fleet of sir Walter Ralegh did go for the
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Divers voyages made by Englishmen to the famous Citie of Mexico, and to all or most part of the other principall provinces, cities, townes and places throughout the great and large kingdom of New Spaine, even as farre as Nicaragua and Panama, & thence to Peru : together with a description of the Spaniards forme of government there: and sundry pleasant relations of the maners and customes of the natural inhabitants, and of the manifold rich commodities & strange rarities found in those partes of the continent: & other matters most worthy the observation. (search)
paine in the sayd shippe, and within 4. dayes arrived in the bay of Cadiz in Andalusia , which is under the kingdom of Spaine, & from thence themselves out of the towne of S. Lucar in a carvel of the citie of Cadiz , and within 6. dayes they arrived at the port of the Grand Canaria,n that which they had neede of, wee shipped our selves in a ship of Cadiz , being one of the saide fleete, which was belonging to an Englishman maried in the citie of Cadiz in Spaine, whose name was John Sweeting, and there came in the sayd ship for captain also an Englishman maried in Cadiz , and sonne in law to the sayde John Sweeting, whose name was Leonard Chilton: there came also in the said ship another Englishm principall man and directer in both fleets. We all departed from Cadiz together the last day of May in the yere 1564: and I with my shop b being desirous to see the world, I embarked my selfe in the bay of Cadiz in Andaluzia, in a shippe bound for the Isles of the Canaries, wher
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of Robert Tomson Marchant, into Nova Hispania in the yeere 1555. with divers observations concerning the state of the Countrey: And certaine accidents touching himselfe. (search)
ich he shipped himselfe for Spaine in the sayd shippe, and within 4. dayes arrived in the bay of Cadiz in Andalusia , which is under the kingdom of Spaine, & from thence went up to the citie of Sivilld and his companie, shipped themselves out of the towne of S. Lucar in a carvel of the citie of Cadiz , and within 6. dayes they arrived at the port of the Grand Canaria, where at our comming the shie came, and there having taken that which they had neede of, wee shipped our selves in a ship of Cadiz , being one of the saide fleete, which was belonging to an Englishman maried in the citie of CadiCadiz in Spaine, whose name was John Sweeting, and there came in the sayd ship for captain also an Englishman maried in Cadiz , and sonne in law to the sayde John Sweeting, whose name was Leonard ChiCadiz , and sonne in law to the sayde John Sweeting, whose name was Leonard Chilton: there came also in the said ship another Englishman which had bene a marchant of the citie of Exeter , one of 50. yeeres or thereabout, whose name was Ralph Sarre. So that wee departed from the
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A voyage made by M. Roger Bodenham to S. John de Ullua in the bay of Mexico, in the yeere 1564. (search)
en of eight or nine score tunnes; and with the same I made a voyage to the West India, having obteined good favour with the Spanish merchants, by reason of my long abode, and marriage in the countrey. My voyage was in the company of the Generall Don Pedro Melendes for Nova Hispania: who being himselfe appointed Generall for Terra Firma and Peru , made his sonne Generall for New Spaine, although Pedro Melendes himselfe was the principall man and directer in both fleets. We all departed from Cadiz together the last day of May in the yere 1564: and I with my shop being under the conduct of the sonne of Don Pedro aforesayd, arrived with him in Nova Hispania, where immediatly I tooke order for the discharge of my merchandise at the port of Vera Cruz, otherwise called Villa Rica, to be transported thence to the city of Mexico , which is sixty and odde leagues distant from the sayd port of Villa Rica. In the way are many good townes, as namely, Pueblo de los Angeles, and another called Tl
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A notable discourse of M. John Chilton, touching the people, maners, mines, cities, riches, forces, and other memorable things of New Spaine, and other provinces in the West Indies, seene and noted by himselfe in the time of his travels, continued in those parts, the space of seventeene or eighteene yeeres. (search)
into Nova Hispania, and so travelled there, and by the South Sea, unto Peru , the space of seventeene or eighteene yeeres: and after that time expired, I returned into Spaine, and so in the yere 1586 in the moneth of July, I arrived at the foresayd city of London : where perusing the notes which I had taken in the time of my travell in those yeeres, I have set downe as followeth. In the yeere 1568, in the moneth of March, being desirous to see the world, I embarked my selfe in the bay of Cadiz in Andaluzia, in a shippe bound for the Isles of the Canaries, where she tooke in her lading, & set forth from thence for the voyage, in the moneth of June, the same yere. Within a moneth after, we fell with the Isle of S. Domingo, and from thence directly to Nova Hispania, and came into the port of S. John de Ullua, which is a litle Island standing in the sea, about two miles from the land, where the king mainteineth about 50 souldiers, and captaines, that keepe the forts, and about 150 neg
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The principal voyages of the English Nation to the Isles of Trinidad, Margarita, Dominica , Deseada, Monserrate, Guadalupe , Martinino, and all the rest of the Antilles ; As likewise to S. Juan de Puerto Rico, to Hispaniola, Jamaica and Cuba : and also to Tierra Firma, and all along the coast and Islands therof, even from Cumana and the Caracos to the neckland of Dariene, and over it to the Gulfe of S. Michael and the Isle of Perles in the South sea: and further to Cabeca Cativa, Nombre de dios, and Venta de cruzes, to Puerto Belo, Rio de Chagre, and the Isle of Escudo, along the maine of Beragua, to the Cape and Gulfe of the Honduras, to Truxillo, Puerto de Cavallos, and all other the principall Townes, Islands and harbours of accompt within the said Gulfe, and up Rio dolce falling into this Gulfe, above 30. leagues : As also to the Isle of Cocumel, and to Cape Cotoche, the towne of Campeche , and other places upon the land of lucatan; and lower downe to S. Juan de Ullua, Vera Cruz, Rio de Panuco, Rio de Palmas, &c. within the Bay of Mexico: and from thence to the Isles of the Tortugas, the port of Havana , the Cape of Florida, and the Gulfe of Bahama homewards. With the taking, sacking, ransoming, or burning of most of the principall Cities and townes upon the coasts of Tierra firma, Nueva Espanna, and all the foresaid Islands; since the most traiterous burning of her Majesties ship the Jesus of Lubec and murthering of her Subjects in the port of S. Juan de Ullua, and the last generall arrest of her Highnesse people, with their ships and goods throughout all the dominions of the King of Spaine in the moneth of June 1585. Besides the manifold and tyrannicall oppressions of the Inquisition inflicted on our nation upon most light and frivolous occasions. (search)
h is very well armed and furnished with great ordinance, and passed lately from Alicante toward Cadiz , and to make up the number of fortie great shippes, which are to be had in Biscay and Guipuscoa. HENRY SAVILE. THE true copie of a letter found at the sacking of Cadiz , written by Don Bernaldino Delgadillo de Avellaneda, Generall of the king of Spaine his Navie in in the same harbour, and the other three were burnt amongst many other shippes at the taking of Cadiz . This I thinke in wise mens judgements, will seeme a silly cause to make a man sorrowe to death.m England into the Continent of Spaine, where amongst other exploites having taken the citie of Cadiz , in the sacke thereof was found some of Don Bernaldino his printed letters: which comming to theleagues from land thou shalt have thirtie fadomes water, and sand: And from thence to the bay of Cadiz thou shalt goe along Northwest by the coast: and if thou be in thirtie or forty fadomes, thou
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The opinion of Don Alvaro Bacan, Marques of Santa Cruz, and high Admirall of Spaine, touching the armie of sir Francis Drake lying at the Isles of Bayona in Galicia , written in Lisbon the 26 of October after the account of Spaine in the yere 1585. (search)
prepare another army to seeke the English fleete, and to fight with it, commanding that the Galeons which belong to the crowne of Portugall, and those of his majestie which lye in the river of Sivill bee prepared to send against them, and to give them the Carena, that they may bee in a readinesse for any voyage howe long soever it bee: And likewise to arrest a Galeon of the Duke of Florence, which is very well armed and furnished with great ordinance, and passed lately from Alicante toward Cadiz , and to make up the number of fortie great shippes, which are to be had in Biscay and Guipuscoa: and that beeing rigged, armed and set in good order, they bee victualled for eight moneths, and that foorthwith there bee levied a thousand mariners of Catalunna and Genoa to bee divided among the Fleete, and bee conducted, as they were for the Fleete of Tercera: furthermore that sixe thousande souldiers bee levied, giving commaundement to presse a greater number, to the ende that these may bee
1 2 3