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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 8 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 6 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 6 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
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Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), Book 2, section 91 (search)
to his prodigious degree of wisdom; for that name denotes the revealer of secrets. He also married a wife of very high quality; for he married the daughter of Petephres, This Potiphar, or, as Josephus, Petephres, who was now a priest of On, or Heliopolis, is the same name in Josephus, and perhaps in Moses also, with him who is before called head cook or captain of the guard, and to whom Joseph was sold. See Genesis 37:36; 39:1, with 41:50. They are also affirmed to be one and the same person inand mistress. Nor is this a notion peculiar to that Testament, but, as Dr. Bernard confesses, note on Antiq. B. II. ch. 4. sect. 1, common to Josephus, to the Septuagint interpreters, and to other learned Jews of old time. one of the priests of Heliopolis; she was a virgin, and her name was Asenath. By her he had children before the scarcity came on; Manasseh, the elder, which signifies forgetful, because his present happiness made him forget his former misfortunes; and Ephraim, the younger, whi
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), Book 2, section 187 (search)
When Jacob was come to the king, and saluted him, and wished all prosperity to his government, Pharaoh asked him how old he now was; upon whose answer, that he was a hundred and thirty years old, he admired Jacob on account of the length of his life. And when he had added, that still he had not lived so long as his forefathers, he gave him leave to live with his children in Heliopolis; for in that city the king's shepherds had their pasturage.
Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), Book I, section 31 (search)
to Judea. The king being thereto disposed beforehand, complied with them, and came upon the Jews with a great army, and took their city by force, and slew a great multitude of those that favored Ptolemy, and sent out his soldiers to plunder them without mercy. He also spoiled the temple, and put a stop to the constant practice of offering a daily sacrifice of expiation for three years and six months. But Onias, the high priest, fled to Ptolemy, and received a place from him in the Nomus of Heliopolis, where he built a city resembling Jerusalem, and a temple that was like its temple I see little difference in the several accounts in Josephus about the Egyptian temple Onion, of which large complaints are made by his commentators. Onias, it seems, hoped to have :made it very like that at Jerusalem, and of the same dimensions; and so he appears to have really done, as far as he was able and thought proper. Of this temple, see Antiq. B. XIII. ch. 3. sect. 1--3, and Of the War, B. VII. ch. 1
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), BOOK I, section 279 (search)
It now remains that I debate with Manetho about Moses. Now the Egyptians acknowledge him to have been a wonderful and a divine person; nay, they would willingly lay claim to him themselves, though after a most abusive and incredible manner, and pretend that he was of Heliopolis, and one of the priests of that place, and was ejected out of it among the rest, on account of his leprosy; although it had been demonstrated out of their records that he lived five hundred and eighteen years earlier, and then brought our forefathers out of Egypt into the country that is now inhabited by us. But now that he was not subject in his body to any such calamity, is evident from what he himself tells us; for he forbade those that had the leprosy either to continue in a city, or to inhabit in a village, but commanded that they should go about by themselves with their clothes rent; and declares that such as either touch them, or live under the same roof with them, should be esteemed unclean; nay, more, i
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), BOOK II, section 8 (search)
r any other calamities of that sort; yet will I briefly take notice of what Apion adds upon that subject; for in his third book, which relates to the affairs of Egypt, he speaks thus: "I have heard of the ancient men of Egypt, that Moses was of Heliopolis, and that he thought himself obliged to follow the customs of his forefathers, and offered his prayers in the open air, towards the city walls; but that he reduced them all to be directed towards sun-rising, which was agreeable to the situation of Heliopolis; that he also set up pillars instead of gnomons, This seems to have been the first dial that had been made in Egypt, and was a little before the time that Ahaz made his [first] dial in Judea, and about anno 755, in the first year of the seventh olympiad, as we shall see presently. See 2 Kings 20:11; Isaiah 38:8. under which was represented a cavity like that of a boat, and the shadow that fell from their tops fell down upon that cavity, that it might go round about the like course
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Claudius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 20 (search)
out circular piers on the right and on the left, with a mole protecting, in deep water, the entrance of the port.Ostia is referred to in a note, TIBERIUS, c. xi. To secure the foundation of this mole, he sunk the vessel in which the great obeliskSuetonius calls this " the great obelisk " in comparison with those which Augustus had placed in the Circus Maximus and Campus Martius. The one here mentioned was erected by Caligula in his Circus, afterwards called the Circus of Nero. It stood at Heliopolis, having been dedicated to the sun, as Herodotus informs us, by Phero, son of Sesostris, in acknowledgment of his recovery from blindness. It was removed by Pope Sixtus V. in 1586, under the celebrated architect, Fontana, to the centre of the area before St. Peter's, in the Vatican, not far from its former position. This obelisk is a solid piece of red granite, without hieroglyphics, and, with the pedestal and ornaments at the top, is 182 feet high. The height of the obelisk itself is 113 p
ones alternately laid flat and set up endwise; the latter were usually much longer than the others. This is termed long and short work (J). Masonry. Stone at Baalbek. In the Norman period, herring-bone work (K) was frequently employed in rubble walls. The stones used during the Middle Ages were seldom larger than could f say five feet. The largest stones ever placed in a wall by the hand of man are probably those in the foundations of the west and north sides of the temple of Baalbek. Thompson says: — The first tier above ground consists of stones of different lengths, but all above 12 feet thick and the same in width. Then come three stoody and back 6 1/2 meters, or about 72, 21, and 21 English feet, which, at 13 cubic feet per ton, yields nearly 2,500 tons. See also masonry, where the stones of Baalbek are noticed. Monte-Jus. Monte-jus. (Sugar.) A force-pump by which the juice from the canemill is raised to the clarifiers on the story above. It cons
the obelisks of Thebes and Heliopolis. The modes of quarrying may have differed somewhat, according to the material and the position. One granite obelisk was broken after it was cut and before it was removed. From the size of the opening it would be impossible to turn the stone, which would require to be lifted bodily, like other stones removed from the same quarry. Bronze was the usual metal of the tools. The largest stones in any known building are those of the temple platform at Baalbek. The Egyptian mode of quarrying was by uncovering the stratum of stone, leveling the surface, and marking out an area sufficient to yield the amount of stone required. Around this was cut a deep trench, and cross-trenches at right angles divided the whole area into squares of such a size as was required. Layer after layer was then removed. Another mode was by working on a perpendicular face, forming a series of steps on the side of the mountain, from which the blocks were lowered by