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T. Maccius Plautus, Pseudolus, or The Cheat (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan) 2 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 2 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Politics 2 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 2 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 2 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 2 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 2 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 2 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden) 2 0 Browse Search
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John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 1 (search)
Tu quoque, i. e. besides Misenus and Palinurus. Cerda comp. the opening of G. 3, Te quoque, magna Pales. Heyne (Excursus 1) remarks that the nurse was a personage of great consequence in an ancient family, as appears in the tragedians. Comp. 5. 645. The town and promontory of Caieta were on the confines of Latium and Campania, near Formiae; and at Formiae, according to Livy 40. 2, there was a temple of Apollo and Caieta. For the legend and etymology of the name see Heyne, Exc. 1, Lewis vol. 1. pp. 326 foll. Litoribus nostris is a vague or exaggerated expression. Caieta may be said to have conferred fame on a single spot on the Italian coast: the coast itself rather conferred fame on her. The poet speaks in his own person, as in 9. 446, though the feeling here is more national than personal. Aeneia nutrix like Aeneia puppis 10. 156, Aeneia hospitia ib. 494, Tithonia coniunx 8. 384. So the Homeric bi/h *(hraklhei/h.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 733-743 (search)
Oebalus leads forces from Capreae and places in Campania.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 738 (search)
The Sarrastes are unknown to history: but Serv. refers to a work on Italy by Conon for the statement that they were Pelasgian and other Greek emigrants who settled in Campania, and gave the river near which they took up their abode the name of Sarnus from a river in their own country. No Greek river is mentioned as bearing the name: nor is it known when Conon lived, though there were two or three writers so called (Dict. B. Conon). For Sarnus see Dict. G., where it is said that the course of the river is not now what it was, having doubtless been changed by the eruption of Vesuvius which overthrew Herculaneum and Pompeii.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 739 (search)
Rufrae seems to have been a Samnite town on the borders of Campania. Batulum is only mentioned by Silius, and Celemna (sacred to Juno, according to Serv.) not even by him.
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden), Book 7, line 733 (search)
Nor Oebalus, shalt thou be left unsung, From nymph Semethis and old Telon sprung, Who then in Teleboan Capri reign'd; But that short isle th' ambitious youth disdain'd, And o'er Campania stretch'd his ample sway, Where swelling Sarnus seeks the Tyrrhene sea; O'er Batulum, and where Abella sees, From her high tow'rs, the harvest of her trees. And these (as was the Teuton use of old) Wield brazen swords, and brazen bucklers hold; Sling weighty stones, when from afar they fight; Their casques are cork, a covering thick and light.
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley), book 1, He describes a certain journey of his from Rome to Brundusium with great pleasantry. (search)
s there a person in the world more bound to them than myself. 0h what embraces, and what transports were there! While I am in my senses, nothing can I prefer to a pleasant friend. The village, which is next adjoining to the bridge of Campania, accommodated us with lodging [at night]; and the public officers Parochi . Before the consulship of Lucius Posthumius, the magistrates of Rome traveled at the public charge, without being burthen is a nominative case, and we must construe it, Osci sunt clarum genus Messii. The Oscans gave to Messius his illustrious birth, a sufficient proof that he was an infamous scoundrel. The people who inhabited this part of Campania were guilty of execrable debaucheries. Sarmentus's mistress is still alive. Sprung from such families as these, they came to the combat. First, Sarmentus: "I pronounce thee to have the look of a mad horse." We laugh; and Messi
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley), book 1, Of true nobility. (search)
plate of onions, pulse, and pancakes. My supper is served up by three slaves; and a white stone slab supports two cups and a brimmer: near the salt-cellar stands a homely cruet Echino vilis. We can not precisely determine what the guttus and echinus were. Mr. Dacier thinks the first was a little urn, out of which they poured water into a basin, echinus, to wash their hands. with a little bowl, earthen-ware from Campania. Then I go to rest; by no means concerned that I must rise in the morning, and pay a visit to the statue of Marsyas, Marsyas, a satyr, who, challenging Apollo to a trial of skill in music, was overcome and flayed alive by the god. A statue was erected to him in the forum, opposite to the rostra where the judges determined causes, and the poet pleasantly says, it stood in such an attitude as showed its indignation to behold a man who had been a slave, now
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley), book 2, A smart description of a miser ridiculously acting the extravagant. (search)
than it) with white pepper, and vinegar which, by being vitiated, turned sour the Methymnean grape. I first showed the way to stew in it the green rockets and bitter elecampane: Curtillus, [to stew in it] the sea-urchins unwashed, as being better than the pickle which the sea shell-fish yields. In the mean time the suspended tapestry made a heavy downfall upon the dish, bringing along with it more black dust than the north wind ever raises on the plains of Campania. Having been fearful of something worse, as soon as we perceive there was no danger, we rise up. Rufus, hanging his head, began to weep, as if his son had come to an untimely death: what would have been the end, had not the discreet Nomentanus thus raised his friend! "Alas! 0 fortune, what god is more cruel to us than thou? How dost thou always take pleasure in sporting with human affairs!" Varius could scarcely smother a laugh with his napkin. Balatro, sneerin
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan), BOOK II, CHAPTER VI: POZZOLANA (search)
n. Hence it is not in all the places where boiling springs of hot water abound, that there is the same combination of favourable circumstances which has been described above. For things are produced in accordance with the will of nature; not to suit man's pleasure, but as it were by a chance distribution. 6. Therefore, where the mountains are not earthy but consist of soft stone, the force of the fire, passing through the fissures in the stone, sets it afire. The soft and delicate part is burned out, while the hard part is left. Consequently, while in Campania the burning of the earth makes ashes, in Tuscany the combustion of the stone makes carbuncular sand. Both are excellent in walls, but one is better to use for buildings on land, the other for piers under salt water. The Tuscan stone is softer in quality than tufa but harder than earth, and being thoroughly kindled by the violent heat from below, the result is the production in some places of the kind of sand called carbuncular.
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan), BOOK II, CHAPTER VII: STONE (search)
ion stone and supplies of rubble to be used in building are taken and brought together. The stone in quarries is found to be of different and unlike qualities. In some it is soft: for example, in the environs of the city at the quarries of Grotta Rossa, Palla, Fidenae, and of the Alban hills; in others, it is medium, as at Tivoli, at Amiternum, or Mt. Soracte, and in quarries of this sort; in still others it is hard, as in lava quarries. There are also numerous other kinds: for instance, in Campania, red and black tufas; in Umbria, Picenum, and Venetia, white tufa which can be cut with a toothed saw, like wood. 2. All these soft kinds have the advantage that they can be easily worked as soon as they have been taken from the quarries. Under cover they play their part well; but in open and exposed situations the frost and rime make them crumble, and they go to pieces. On the seacoast, too, the salt eats away and dissolves them, nor can they stand great heat either. But travertine and all
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