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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 12 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 10 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 8 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 8 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 6 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 6 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 6 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 6 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 4 0 Browse Search
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Verona (Italy) or search for Verona (Italy) in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 12: Greece and other lands 1867; aet. 48 (search)
er visiting Crete (in spite — perhaps partly because — of the fact that a high price was set on his head) and the various colonies of refugees, the Doctor felt that further aid must be obtained. Accordingly, the journeyings of the little party after leaving Greece were for the most part only less hurried than the earlier ones, the exception being a week of enchantment spent in Venice, awaiting the Doctor, who had been called back to Athens at the moment of departure. The Journal tells of Verona, Innsbriick, Munich. Then came flying glimpses of Switzerland, with a few days' rest at Geneva, where she had the happiness of meeting her sister once more; finally, Paris and the Exposition of 1867. After a visit to Napoleon's tomb, she writes: Spent much of the afternoon in beginning a piece of tapestry after a Pompeiian pattern copied by me on the spot. Worsted work was an unfailing accompaniment of her journeyings in those days; indeed, until age and weariness came upon her, she n
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 1: Europe revisited--1877; aet. 58 (search)
s the water another hand pure and resolute as itself. The two comrades journeyed southward by way of Turin, Milan, and Verona. Of the last place the Journal says:-- Busy in Verona--first, amphitheatre, with its numerous cells, those of the wilVerona--first, amphitheatre, with its numerous cells, those of the wild beasts wholesomely lighted and aired, those of the prisoners, dark and noisome and often without light of any kind.... Then to the tombs of the Scaligers — grim and beautiful. Can Signoria who killed his brother was the last. Can Grande, Dante's host. In Verona she was full of visions of the great poet whose exile she describes in the poem called, The price of the Divina Commedia. One who met her there remembers the extraordinary vividness of her impressions. It was as if she had seen a with Dante, had heard from his own lips how hard it was to eat the salt and go up and down the stairs of others. From Verona to Venice, thence to Bologna. Venice was an old friend always revisited with delight. Bologna was new to her; here she