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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 50 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 34 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 34 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 30 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 22 0 Browse Search
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 16 0 Browse Search
Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 16 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 14 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Vienna (Wien, Austria) or search for Vienna (Wien, Austria) in all documents.

Your search returned 17 results in 3 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 21: Germany.—October, 1839, to March, 1840.—Age, 28-29. (search)
e Danube to Linz, and by carriage from Linz to Vienna, where he arrived on the twenty-fifth. Here hrney for conversations with his friends. From Vienna he wrote to his mother, urging that his brotheVivian Grey was not written in a garret. Vienna, Oct. 26. At length in Vienna. Left MunichVienna. Left Munich in the eilwagen Stage-coach. for Passau; rode a day and night. At Passau, with an English frienorhood of Odessa. At Linz took a carriage for Vienna,—two days and a half,—where I arrived yesterda than the poetry. To Henry W. Longfellow. Vienna, Nov. 10, 1839. dear Henry,—. . . I shall s, as the society is, I should prefer it before Vienna, where aristocracy has its most select home. ath of Mrs. Clay, the wife of our Secretary at Vienna, J. Randolph Clay, afterwards Minister to Pn each other during their brief intercourse in Vienna. whom I came to know quite well during my stayour delightful letter of August 13 found me at Vienna, fairly escaped from the fascinations of Italy[3 more...
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Vienna, Oct. 26. (search)
Vienna, Oct. 26. At length in Vienna. Left Munich in the eilwagen Stage-coach. for Passau; rode a day and night. At Passau, with an English friend, chartered a little gondola, or skiff, down the Danube, seventy miles, to Linz; dropped with the current, through magnificent scenery, till towards midnight, and stopped at aVienna. Left Munich in the eilwagen Stage-coach. for Passau; rode a day and night. At Passau, with an English friend, chartered a little gondola, or skiff, down the Danube, seventy miles, to Linz; dropped with the current, through magnificent scenery, till towards midnight, and stopped at a little village on the banks. To our inquiries, if they ever saw any English there, we were told they should as soon expect to see the Almighty; and I was asked if America was not in the neighborhood of Odessa. At Linz took a carriage for Vienna,—two days and a half,—where I arrived yesterday. You have doubtless heard of WebsteVienna,—two days and a half,—where I arrived yesterday. You have doubtless heard of Webster's reception in England. I have just read a letter from my friend Morpeth Lord Morpeth said, also, in the letter: He (Mr. Webster) talked with great respect of you. (to whom I sent a letter for Webster), who says he was much struck by him; there seemed to be a colossal placidity about him. All appear to think him reserved a
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Vienna, Nov. 6. (search)
Vienna, Nov. 6. No letter from you! Have you forgotten me already, or has the post miscarried? . . . In my letter from Milan I announced to you the coming of two Americans—Preston and Lewis—to whom I wished you, for various reasons, to be kind; also of Sir Charles Vaughan. Perhaps the recent death of Sir Charles's brother, Mr. Justice Vaughan. may have prevented his reaching there. If you see him there I wish you would remember me cordially to him, and if you can with propriety, say that I most sincerely sympathize with him in the affliction of his brother's death. His brother was a very kind friend of mine, and a most distinguished man. I have another English friend who will arrive in Rome very soon,—Mr. Kenyon, the ancient friend of Coleridge, and now the bosom friend of Southey, Wordsworth, and Landor. He is a cordial, hearty, accomplished, scholarly man. Rely upon his frankness and goodness. Ever yours,