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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 50 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 34 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 34 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 30 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 22 0 Browse Search
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 16 0 Browse Search
Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 16 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 14 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Vienna (Wien, Austria) or search for Vienna (Wien, Austria) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 6: (search)
ve seen in Germany. Learning I was from Boston, he told his wife to give me a very poor cup of tea, if indeed she would give me any at all; for that in Boston we once rebelliously wasted and destroyed several cargoes of it. He talked only on political subjects. March 31.—I dined with Beauvillers, a rich banker, with a party of eighteen or twenty merchants, many of them foreigners who have come to the fair now going on here. My chief amusement was to observe how exactly these people from Vienna, Hamburg, Konigsberg, and Trieste, are like the merchants in Amsterdam, London, and Boston, and to listen to their comical abuse, which all true Frankforters poured out against the Diet, its members, their operations, pride, etc., etc. I passed an extremely pleasant evening at Senator Smidt's, a man of talent, Ambassador from Bremen, with much influence in the Bundestag. There was a large supper-party, consisting of Count Goltz, the Prussian Ambassador, the Darmstadt Minister, Baron Gage
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 23: (search)
Granard, and nephew of the late Marquis of Hastings,—better known as the Prince of Wales's Earl of Moira and the South Carolina Lord Rawdon,—and he lives here in a very pleasant, hospitable, and comfortable style, as a bachelor. His sister, Lady Rancliffe,—now, I think, just about fifty,—pleasant and good-natured, is here on a visit to him. Mr. Forbes is, I should think, not far from the age of his sister, and has been for a great many years in the diplomatic service of England,—at Lisbon, Vienna, etc.,—but he has never been a full minister till he was sent as such to this Court, two or three years ago. He seems extremely good-humored, and much disposed to do what will be useful and agreeable to us, and came with Lady Rancliffe and spent part of last evening with us. One evening he carried me to the house of General Watzdorff,— the principal officer in the King's household,—who receives once a week. There were about sixty or eighty persons present, including the whole d
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 25: (search)
endly streets, it seemed as if we were returning to a home, so natural and cheerful did everything appear to us. As we intended only to pass the night in Dresden, I went out immediately to see Tieck, whom I had promised to see again on our way to Vienna. By chance it was his birthday, and I found him surrounded by a large party of his friends, many of whom I knew perfectly well. It was an agreeable surprise to me to be greeted by so many, once more, whom I had not thought to meet again. Amonives at home and takes care of the estate; a truly agreeable, natural, frank young man of about sevenand-twenty, with a good deal of talent, much accomplished in the arts, and otherwise thoroughly educated. The second son [Count Frederick] is in Vienna; and the third [Count Leo], about twenty-four years old, has a place in the government at Prague, lives there chiefly, and manages another great estate of the family in that neighborhood. Both of them, as I was told in Dresden, are rather uncomm