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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 88 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 42 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 32 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 20 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 16 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 14 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 10 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 10 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 20, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Saxony (Saxony, Germany) or search for Saxony (Saxony, Germany) in all documents.

Your search returned 16 results in 14 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), De Zeng, Frederick Augustus, Baron, 1756-1838 (search)
De Zeng, Frederick Augustus, Baron, 1756-1838 military officer; born in Dresden, Saxony, in 1756; came to America in 1780 as captain in one of the Hessian regiments; and at the end of the Revolutionary War married an American lady and settled in Red Hook, N. Y. He was naturalized in 1789, and became intimate with Chancellor Livingston, Governor Clinton, General Schuyler, and others, and was greatly interested in the opening of canals and in the navigation of the interior waters and lakes. He died in Clyde, N. Y., April 26, 1838.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dieskau, Ludwig August, Baron, 1701-1757 (search)
Dieskau, Ludwig August, Baron, 1701-1757 Military officer; born in Saxony in 1701; was lieutenant-colonel of cavalry under Marshal Saxe, and was made brigadier-general of infantry in 1748, and commander of Brest. In 1755 he was sent to Canada with the rank of major-general; and in an attack upon the fortified encampment of Gen. William Johnson at the head of Lake George (Sept. 8, 1755) he was so severely wounded that he died in Surenne, near Paris, Sept. 8, 1757.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Franklin, Benjamin 1706-1790 (search)
for which we refer to their petitions on the journals of the House of Commons. And we presume we may safely call on the body of the British tradesmen, who have had experience of both, to say, whether they have not received much more punctual payment from us, than they generally have from the members of their own two Houses of Parliament. On the whole of the above it appears that the charge of ingratitude towards the mother-country, brought with so much confidence against the colonies, is totally without foundation; and that there is much more reason for retorting that charge on Britain, who, not only never contributes any aid, nor affords, by an exclusive commerce, any advantages to Saxony, her mother-country; but no longer since than in the last war, without the least provocation, subsidized the King of Prussia while he ravaged that mother-country, and carried fire and sword into its capital, the fine city of Dresden! An example we hope no provocation will induce us to imitate.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Louis Xvi., King of France (search)
Louis Xvi., King of France Born in Versailles, Aug. 23, 1754; was a grandson of Louis XV. and of a daughter of Frederick Augustus, King of Poland and Elector of Saxony. His father dying in 1765, he became heir presumptive to the throne of France, which he ascended on May 10, 1774, with the beautiful Marie Antoinette, Archduchess of Austria, whom he married in May, 1770, as his Queen. Louis was amiable, fond of simple enjoyments, and was beloved by his people. Through bad advisers and the wickedness of demagogues, he was placed in seeming opposition to the people when his heart was really with them, and the madmen of France, who ruled the realm during the Reign of Terror, brought both Louis and his beautiful Queen to the scaffold. They went through the farce of a trial after Louis Xvi. arraigning the King on a charge of treason, found him guilty, of course, and beheaded him by the guillotine, with accompaniments of vulgar cruelty, in Paris, Jan. 21, 1793. His death was ser
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ludewig, Hermann Ernst 1809-1856 (search)
Ludewig, Hermann Ernst 1809-1856 Lawyer; born in Dresden, Saxony, Oct. 14, 1809; became a lawyer and settled in New York City in 1846, where he was naturalized and engaged in practice. He was the author of Literature of American local history; Supplement relating to local history of New York; Literature of American aboriginal Linguistics, etc. He died in Brooklyn, N. Y., Dec. 12, 1856.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lyman, Benjamin Smith 1835- (search)
Lyman, Benjamin Smith 1835- Geologist; born in Northampton, Mass., Dec. 11, 1835; graduated at Harvard College in 1855; studied in Paris in 1859-61, and in Saxony in 1861-62; was assistant geologist of the State of Iowa in 1859; spent several years in private geological and mining engineering work; and was assistant geologist of the State of Pennsylvania in 1887-95. Mr. Lyman has travelled extensively in the United States, Europe, India, and Japan; is a member of many scientific societies; and has published numerous papers and reports on his various employments.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McClellan, George Brinton 1826-1885 (search)
w over the President, army, and people, are subjects of no less vital importance in war than in peace. Believing that the views here expressed are those of the convention, and the people you represent, I accept the nomination. I realize the weight of the responsibility to be borne should the people ratify your choice. Conscious of my own weakness, I can only seek fervently the guidance of the Ruler of the Universe, and, relying on His all-powerful aid, do my best to restore Union and peace to a suffering people, and to establish and guard their liberties and rights. Very respectfully, Geo. B. Mcclellan. Lawyer; born in Dresden, Saxony, Nov. 23, 1865; son of Gen. George B. McClellan: graduated at Princeton University in 1886, became a journalist in New York City; appointed treasurer of the New York and Brooklyn Bridge in 1889; admitted to the bar in 1892; president of the New York board of aldermen in 1893-94: and elected to Congress as a Democrat in 1895, 1897, and 1899.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Moravians. (search)
ch in Bohemia and Moravia was almost extinguished, and its faith—a hidden seed—was preserved by a few families for 100 years, when it was renewed with strength. In 1722 two Moravian families found a refuge on the estate of Count Zinzendorf, of Saxony, then an officer in the Saxon Court, and a lover of pure and simple worship. In five years 300 Moravians gathered there. Zinzendorf became a bishop, and afterwards he spent his life and fortune in missionary work. Churches were established oeveral church boarding-schools; and, at Bethlehem, a college and theological seminary. At first the social and political exclusiveness of the Moravians prevented a rapid increase in their numbers; but latterly there have been great changes in this respect, as well as in the constitution of the church, whose grand centre is at Herrnhutt, in Saxony, the village built on Count Zinzendorf's estate. The Moravians use a liturgy, and their ritual is similar to that of the Protestant Episcopal Chu
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Morris, George Pope 1802-1864 (search)
of the New mirror, and afterwards (1844) in the daily Evening mirror. In 1845 he began the National press, and in 1846 the Home journal. Mr. Morris achieved great popularity as a songwriter. His lyrics are very numerous, one of the best known being Woodman, spare that tree. In 1825 he wrote a drama, Briercliff, in five acts, founded upon events of the American Revolution. It was performed forty successive nights, and paid the author $3,500. In 1842 he wrote an opera entitled The maid of Saxony. A brief catalogue of Morris's best songs may be found in Allibone's Dictionary of British and American authors. William Howitt, after speaking of the beauty and naturalness of Morris's love-songs, gives, in the following words, a generous touch of the character of all of his writings: He has never attempted to robe vice in beauty; and, as has been well remarked, his lays can bring to the cheek of purity no blush but that of pleasure. He is properly called the song-writer of America. He
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ottendorfer, Oswald 1826- (search)
Ottendorfer, Oswald 1826- Journalist; born in Zwittau, Moravia, Feb. 26, 1826; studied in the universities of Prague and Vienna; took part in the Austrian Revolution of 1848; the Schleswig-Holstein war against Denmark; and in the revolutions in Baden and Saxony; came to the United States in 1850; was proprietor of the Staats-Zeitung, New York; and gave large sums of money to educational and charitable institutions. He was an active Democrat, but opposed to Tammany Hall. He died in New York City, Dec. 15, 1900.
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