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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 88 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 42 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 32 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 20 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 16 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 14 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 10 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 10 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 20, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for Saxony (Saxony, Germany) or search for Saxony (Saxony, Germany) in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 5 document sections:

George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 4: (search)
blishment which belonged neither to Hanover nor to Germany, but to Europe and the world; and he was not only true to the promise he made to the faculty here, to protect them, but, under the government of Jerome, they were liberally assisted by the influence and even the wealth of the throne. In consequence of this, Gottingen, instead of coming from the hands of the French nearly abolished, like the universities of Holland, or mutilated and abridged in its funds and privileges, like those of Saxony, now stands higher than it ever stood before, and at this moment—when an immense proportion of the young men of the country are in the ranks of the army, from choice or compulsion, and all the other literary establishments, even those at Halle, Leipsic, and Berlin, are languishing for want of pupils—reckons on its books above eight hundred and forty regular pupils. The number of professors is proportionally great. There are nearly forty, appointed and paid by the government, and there are
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 5: (search)
f letters gradually became separated from the active and political men, until at last this division became so distinct and perfect that they formed an entirely separate class through all the German States, and have long since ceased to be amenable to any influence but that of the general opinion of their own body. In this way, a genuine republic of letters arose in the north of Germany. At first it comprehended but a small portion of the territories of the unwieldy empire, hardly more than Saxony, Prussia, and Hanover, and the small States lying round them; but, as Protestant learning and philosophical modes of thinking and liberal universities were extended, the limits of this invisible empire extended with them. The German and reformed portion of Switzerland soon came in; soon after Denmark, and then a part of Poland; and now, lately, the king of Bavaria, by the establishment of gymnasia, and an academy on the German system, and by calling in the Protestants of the North to hel
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 23: (search)
ronomer by education and choice, and, after Baron Zach left the Observatory at Gotha, was for several years the head of it. How he came at the head of affairs in Saxony I know not; but up to 1830, and indeed for some time after that revolution, he had the Portfolio of the Interior. He is liberal in his opinions, but still, not binstantly, in the evening, to the crowded marketplace, and by the light of a few torches took a solemn oath, that if that threat should be executed he would leave Saxony and never return. The people, knowing his sincerity, gave up the plan and made him Regent. This Prince, however,—Frederic,—though twice married, has no childrenemed to enjoy the show very much, and were perfectly quiet the whole evening. In the centre were about four hundred invited guests, comprehending the nobility of Saxony and the principal foreigners now in Dresden, all in full dress. It was a fine show in a fine hall. Soon after we arrived the King and Court entered, preceded
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 24: (search)
h last, Mr. Forbes said, were the very words of the letter. April 22.—To-day we dined with General Von Leyser, the President of the Chamber of Deputies. . . .. . It was quite elegant and very pleasant. The old general himself has been through all, perhaps, that man could go through in the last thirty years. He fought at the battle of Jena, with the Prussians, against the French, and six weeks afterwards fought with the French against the Prussians. Following the course of the King of Saxony. He went through the Russian campaign,—still on the French side; was one of eleven, out of above seven hundred officers under his command, that came back alive; was left for dead at the battle of Moskwa, and had his fingers and toes frozen in the night, but was picked up in the morning by the Russians and sent as a prisoner, with nearly four hundred other officers, into Asia, where he was kindly and well treated, but where the climate was so fatal to them that he was the only person that liv
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 25: (search)
cter, and his good intentions. While he lives, therefore, I think there will be no movement. But he is now sixty-six years old, and men are already anxiously inquiring whether his successor will not give them the representative forms enjoyed in Saxony, Bavaria, and elsewhere in Germany. And how can it be otherwise? The whole training of the Prussian people for above five-and-twenty years has been fitting them for a freer government. When Scharnhorst provided for making every man in the couecting tower of the castle, which almost overhangs the Elbe, commanding very grand and beautiful views up and down the river. The conversation was very agreeable. Mr. Noel, an Englishman of about five-and-thirty, quite well known in Austria and Saxony for his talents and philanthropy, and a near connection of Lady Byron, is an inmate of the family, and talks extremely well. He is a great admirer of Dr. Channing, as is also Count Leo, the third son of Count Thun, who has translated the Essay o