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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 349 3 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 8 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 6 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. 4 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography, Chapter 16: (search)
could for the returning troops, many of whom were in a wretched condition from malarial diseases. In May, 1898, Dewey having sunk the Spanish fleet and captured Manila, it became necessary for the Government to occupy the Philippine Islands. At first it seemed there was to be no resistance, but Aguinaldo renewed hostilities, ane service in the line better than that of the staff. In August he joined his regiment at San Antonio, Texas, where they were ordered to San Francisco to sail for Manila in October. On their arrival in Manila he found General Lloyd Wheaton, an aid on his father's staff at the close of the Civil War, watching for his arrival, as GManila he found General Lloyd Wheaton, an aid on his father's staff at the close of the Civil War, watching for his arrival, as General Wheaton wanted my son's regiment to join his command. He desired to have Major Logan with him, as he was greatly attached to Jack as the son of his old commander. Major Logan helped get General Otis to make the assignment and they embarked for northern Luzon in a few days with General Wheaton's command. Major Logan was
we's Shop, was made major-general of volunteers for gallant service in the battles of Winchester and Fisher's Hill, and brigadier-general in the United States Army for Five Forks. The boy generals won more than their share of glory on the grim foughten field. Adelbert Ames as Brigadier-General with his staff Judson Kilpatrick as Brigadier–General Major–General Wesley Merritt and staff thick of the fray at Gettysburg, but lived to fight another day and win his own double stars at Manila. And while the regulations forbade carrying the musket before reaching one's eighteenth birthday, they were oddly silent as to the age at which one might wield the sword, and so it resulted that boys of sixteen and seventeen were found at the front wearing the shoulder-straps of lieutenants, and some of them becoming famous in an army of famous men. Two instances were those of two of the foremost majorgenerals of later years—Henry W. Lawton, of Indiana, and Arthur MacArthur, of Wiscons<
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 2: the battle of Bull Run (July, 1861) (search)
o give him orders, and the responsibility overwhelmed him. To nothing else can we attribute the excessive caution which here characterized the conduct of both our generals and of the President. Similar instances may be found in the stories of many battles. Magruder had already illustrated it at Big Bethel. Meade afterward did likewise at Gettysburg, and, even in our most recent war, the siege of Santiago narrowly escaped being terminated by a retreat. The capture of the Spanish fleet at Manila was delayed by a suspension for breakfast, and for an unnecessary inventory of ammunition. All these events took place under the pressure of new responsibilities. Longstreet, in his book, Manassas to Appomattox, p. 52, gives the following account of the final scene:— When within artillery range of the retreating column passing through Centreville, the infantry was deployed on the sides of the road under cover of the forest, so as to give room for the batteries ordered into action i
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Aguinaldo, Emilio, 1870- (search)
de Lateran and the University of St. Tomas, in Manila. Later he became the protege of a Jesuit priecal department of the Pontifical University of Manila. In 1883 he went to Hong-Kong, became interesight of sacking the city, after the capture of Manila, soon caused serious relations between the natsive conspiracy among the native population of Manila, with the intention of massacring the entire A Province, Luzon, and was immediately taken to Manila. He had been located by means of the capture of his secret cipher code in a drug-store in Manila, from which the insurgents had been furnished eceived them, and conveyed the entire party to Manila. On April 2 he subscribed and swore to theout fifteen minutes, according to the press of Manila, or otherwise submitting them to unheard — of liberty. According to the censored press of Manila during the month of October only thirty-six Fidress to the Filipinos, which was published in Manila on April 19: I believe I am not in error i[1 more...]
indanao, and Jolo, comprising all the islands ceded to the United States by Spain; headquarters, Manila, P. I. Commander, Maj.-Gen. Arthur MacArthur. Department of Northern Luzon.--Includes all thacos Sur, La Isabela de Luzon, Lepanto, La Union, Nueva Vizcaya, Nueva Ecija, all that portion of Manila north of the Pasig River, Principe, Pangasinan, Pampanga, Tarlac, and Zambales, and all the islas in the Philippine Archipelago north of Manila Bay and the provinces above named: headquarters, Manila, P. I. Commander, Maj.-Gen. Lloyd Wheaton. Department of Southern Luzon.--Includes the Islanding the following provinces: Albay, Batangas, Camarines Norte, Camarines Sur, Cavite, La Laguna, Manila south of the Pasig, and Tayabas, and all islands of the Philippine Archipelago which he south ofing the entire Island of Masbate: thence northerly through San Bernardino Straits; headquarters, Manila, P. I. Commander, Maj.-Gen. John C. Bates. Depairtment of the Visayas.--Includes all islands
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bacolor, (search)
Bacolor, A town in Luzon, Philippine Islands, on the road from Manila to Tarlac; about 30 miles northwest of the former city. During the British invasion of the Philippines, in 1762, it was for some time the capital of the group, the Spaniards, under fear lest the city of Manila should be bombarded, hastily removing their seat of government. The town attracted considerable attention in 1899 because of the United States military operations against the Filipino insurgents and the remarkable; about 30 miles northwest of the former city. During the British invasion of the Philippines, in 1762, it was for some time the capital of the group, the Spaniards, under fear lest the city of Manila should be bombarded, hastily removing their seat of government. The town attracted considerable attention in 1899 because of the United States military operations against the Filipino insurgents and the remarkable chase after Aguinaldo through that section of Luzon. See Aguinaldo, Emilio; Luzon.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
n. Porto RicoMay 12, 1898 Bombardments of forts, Santiago de CubaMay 31, 1898 Daiquiri, CubaJune 21-22, 1898 Juragua, Cuba (Capture)June 24, 1898 Las Guasimas, CubaJune 24, 1898 El Caney, CubaJuly 1, 1898 San Juan Hill, CubaJuly 2, 1898 Destruction of Spanish fleet off SantiagoJuly 3, 1898 Santiago (Military and Naval Bombardment)July 10-17, 1898 Nipe Harbor, CubaJuly 21, 1898 Guanica, Porto RicoJuly 25, 1898 Ponce, Porto RicoJuly 28, 1898 Malate, Philippine IslandsJuly 31, 1898 Manila (Occupied)Aug. 13, 1898 Filipinos begin war on AmericansFeb. 4, 1899 Capture of Aguinaldo ends insurrectionMar. 12, 1901 Fort FrontenacAug. 27, 1758 Alleghany MountainsSept. 21, 1758 Fort NiagaraJuly 25, 1759 MontmorenciJuly 31, 1759 Plains of AbrahamSept. 13, 1759 SilleryApril 28, 1760 Revolutionary War. LexingtonApril 19, 1775 Bunker (Breed's) HillJune 17, 1775 Near Montreal (Ethan Allen captured)Sept. 25, 1775 St. John's (Siege and Capture of)Oct. and Nov. 1775 Great Bri
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bell, James Franklin, 1857- (search)
es Franklin, 1857- Military officer; born in Lexington, Ky., in 1857; was graduated at the United States Military Academy in 1878; promoted to second lieutenant in the 9th Cavalry the same year, first lieutenant in the 7th Cavalry in 1890, and captain in 1899. In the volunteer army he was commissioned major of engineers May 17, 1898; major and assistant adjutant-general, April 17, 1899, and colonel of the 36th United States Infantry, July 5, 1899. In May, 1898, he was ordered to duty to Manila, where he was placed in charge of the Bureau of Information (or secret-service department of the army in the Philippines). In February, 1899, when operations were begun against the Filipino insurgents, he attached himself to the staff of General MacArthur, and rendered important service in scouting. On Sept. 9, for most distinguished gallantry in action near Porac. Luzon, President McKinley directed that a congressional medal of honor should be presented to him. On Nov. 12, Colonel Bell to
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bulacan, (search)
Bulacan, A Philippine town on the island of Luzon, a few miles northwest of Manila. Its population is mostly native, and the town is chiefly engaged in sugarboiling, although there are several other industrial plants. Bulacan was considered a place of considerable strategic importance by the Filipino insurgents after they had been driven from the immediate suburbs of Manila, and because of this fact was the scene of considerable military activity after the American troops began their remawn is chiefly engaged in sugarboiling, although there are several other industrial plants. Bulacan was considered a place of considerable strategic importance by the Filipino insurgents after they had been driven from the immediate suburbs of Manila, and because of this fact was the scene of considerable military activity after the American troops began their remarkable chase after Aguinaldo. Early in 1900 the town was under complete American control, and a military post was established there.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cables, Ocean (search)
ewfoundland, in the summer of 1873, and a few months later the Brazilian telegraph cable was laid from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, to a bay on the coast of Portugal. In 1874 the Direct United States Cable Company was formed and laid a line from Ballenskilligs Bay, Ireland, to Rye, N. H., via Nova Scotia. The same year a sixth line across the Atlantic was laid from Ireland to Newfoundland. Another French line was laid from Brest to St. Pierre, an island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, in 1880. The companies owning all these lines having formed a combination and pooled their receipts, to keep up rates on the transmission of messages, a competing company was formed by James Gordon Bennett and John W. Mackay. This laid in 1884-85 two lines from Ireland to Nova Scotia, having also a connecting line from Ireland to France. In 1900 plans were perfected for a Pacific cable, to extend from San Francisco to Honolulu, thence to Wake Island, Guam Island, and Manila, all United States possessions.
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