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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 349 3 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 8 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 6 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. 4 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Manila (Philippines) or search for Manila (Philippines) in all documents.

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, moved to oppose the latest rifled columbiads and Parrott guns of Goldsborough's fleet. A regiment armed with squirrel rifles and fowling-pieces, and carving knives in place of bayonets, was transported to Roanoke island to engage the admirably equipped soldiers of Burnside. The catalogue of the names of Lynch's fleet in Albemarle sound—the Seabird, Ellis, Beaufort, Curlew, Raleigh, Fanny and Forrest—sounds imposing enough even now when we remember that with fewer vessels Dewey fought at Manila; but when we recall that the flagship was a wooden side-wheeler, carrying only two guns and one of them a smooth-bore; that the other members of the squadron were canal tugboats, carrying one gun each; that the gunners were raw details from raw infantry; that the fleet had frequently to anchor while the crew cut green wood to fire the boilers—when we recall all this, we hardly know whether most to admire their hardihood, or to grieve that so brave a people had to go to war with such a traves<