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Diodorus Siculus, Library 74 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 48 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 34 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 10 0 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 4 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 4 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Rudens, or The Fisherman's Rope (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 4 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 2 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Menaechmi, or The Twin Brothers (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 2 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in T. Maccius Plautus, Rudens, or The Fisherman's Rope (ed. Henry Thomas Riley). You can also browse the collection for Agrigentum (Italy) or search for Agrigentum (Italy) in all documents.

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T. Maccius Plautus, Rudens, or The Fisherman's Rope (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act prologue, scene 0 (search)
earnest, and binds the Procurer with an oath. This Procurer, just as befitted him, did not value at one straw his word, or what, on oath, he had said to the young man. He had a guest, a fit match for himself, an old man of Sicily, a rascal from AgrigentumAgrigentum: This was a town of Sicily, on Mount Acragas, about two miles from the sea. Its inhabitants were famed for their luxurious mode of living., a traitor to his native city; this fellow began to extol the beauty of that maiden, and of thAgrigentum: This was a town of Sicily, on Mount Acragas, about two miles from the sea. Its inhabitants were famed for their luxurious mode of living., a traitor to his native city; this fellow began to extol the beauty of that maiden, and of the other damsels, too, that were belonging to him. On this he began to persuade the Procurer to go together with himself to Sicily; he said that there the men were given to pleasure; that there he might be enabled to become a wealthy man; that there was the greatest profit from courtesans. He prevails. A ship is hired by stealth. Whatever he has, by night the Procurer carries it on board ship from his house; the young man who purchased the damsel of him he has told that he is desirous of performi