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Strabo, Geography 38 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 30 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 16 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 16 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 16 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 14 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Cyclops (ed. David Kovacs) 10 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 10 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden) 8 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Aetna (Italy) or search for Aetna (Italy) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 5 document sections:

John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 376 (search)
Tum vero after a previous clause 5. 720. Tum vero infelix 4. 450. Monstris, phantasies. Comp. 3. 583, inmania monstra Perferimus, the sights and sounds of Aetna, ib. 307, magnis exterrita monstris, the sudden apparition of Aeneas to Andromache.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 786 (search)
Sustinet, doubtless on the top of the helmet, galea alta. In the colossal statue of Athene in the Parthenon at Athens she bore a sphinx on the top of her helmet and a griffin on each side. Paus. 1. 24. 5 (Dict. A. Galea). Aetnaeos, like those of Aetna. Horriferos eructans faucibus aestus Lucr. 3.1012. Virg. thought of Il. 6. 182, deino\n a)popnei/ousa puro\s me/nos ai)qome/noio.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 298 (search)
The facies are taken to be those which Hercules saw in Tartarus, including Typhoeus. But Typhoeus thrust down to Tartarus or buried under Aetna can hardly be called arduus arma tenens. There must be an allusion to some conflict between Hercules and Typhoeus not elsewhere mentioned, or a different view of the state of Typhoeus in Tartarus. Possibly Virg. means to represent Hercules as having taken part in the combat of the gods and the giants: comp. Eur. H. F. 178, toi=si gh=s blasth/masi *gi/gasi pleuroi=s pth/n' e)narmo/sas be/lh *to\n kalli/nikon meta\ *qew=n e)kw/mase. (See Preller, Griechische Mythologie 1, p. 58 foll.) He may have thought of Horace's hymn to Bacchus, 2 Od. 19, where Bacchus' influence over Cerberus is mentioned just after his prowess against the giants: comp. the word disiectae quoted on v. 290. Serv. accepts the reference to the combat with the giants, but, being perplexed by the anachronism, interprets terruit as i. q. terreret or terruisset. Arduus is adverbi
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 419 (search)
Virg. supposes a submarine connexion between Sicily and Hiera. Forb. condemns this interpretation, without saying why, and prefers to take Aetnaea qualia sunt Aetnae. The difficulty was recognized by Serv., one of whose views is that the noise in Hiera is so great as to be echoed by Aetna.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 105 (search)
Torrens is applied to a violent river from the connexion of the notions of heat and vehement motion (comp. aestus). Here advantage is taken of the double meaning of the word to apply it to the infernal river, which is described in language taken partly from Acheron (6. 296), which is a violent muddy stream, partly from Phlegethon (6. 550), which is a river of fire. Comp. Plato Phaedo p. 111, where the mixture of fire and mud is illustrated from the eruptions of Aetna.