Your search returned 209 results in 69 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Aristotle, Politics, Book 5, section 1303a (search)
the additional settlers were discovered plotting against the colonists and were expelled by force of arms; and the people of AntissaIn Lesbos. after admitting the Chian exiles expelled them by arms; and the people of ZancleLater Messana, Messina. after admitting settlers from Samos were themselves expelled; and the people of Apollonia on the Euxine Sea after bringing in additional settlers fell into faction; and the Syracusans after the period of the tyrantsThraforce of arms; and the people of AntissaIn Lesbos. after admitting the Chian exiles expelled them by arms; and the people of ZancleLater Messana, Messina. after admitting settlers from Samos were themselves expelled; and the people of Apollonia on the Euxine Sea after bringing in additional settlers fell into faction; and the Syracusans after the period of the tyrantsThrasybulus succeeded his brother Hiero as tyrant in 467 B.C. and fell within a year.
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XIII, Chapter 4 (search)
When the Syracusans heard that the Athenian armaments were at the Strait,Of Messina. they appointed three generals with supreme power, Hermocrates, Sicanus, and Heracleides, who enrolled soldiers and dispatched ambassadors to the cities of Sicily, urging them to do their share in the cause of their common liberty; for the Athenians, they pointed out, while beginning the war, as they alleged, upon the Syracusans, were in fact intent upon subduing the entire island. Now the Acragantini and Naxians declared that they would ally themselves with the Athenians; the Camarinaeans and Messenians gave assurances that they would maintain the peace, while postponing a reply to the request for an alliance; but the Himeraeans, Selinuntians, Geloans, and Catanaeans promised that they would fight at the side of the Syracusans. The cities of the Siceli, while tending to be favourably inclined toward the Syracusans, nevertheless remained neutral,
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XIII, Chapter 88 (search)
but when the hopes of the barbarians began to rise and so many myriads of human beings were gathered into one city, the grain was exhausted before they were aware of it. And the story is told that also Dexippus the Lacedaemonian was corrupted by a bribe of fifteen talents; for without hesitation he replied to a question of the generals of the Italian Greeks, "Yes, it's better if the war is settled somewhere else, for our provisions have failed." Consequently the generals, offering as their excuse that the time agreed upon for the campaign had elapsed, led their troops off to the Strait.Presumably of Messina. After the departure of these troops the generals met with the commanders and decided to make a survey of the supply of grain in the city, and when they discovered that it was quite low, they perceived that they were compelled to desert the city. At once, then, they issued orders that all should leave on the next night.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 6, chapter 22 (search)
so after the sea-fight they took counsel immediately and resolved that before Aeaces the tyrant came to their country they would sail to a colony, rather than remain and be slaves of the Medes and Aeaces. The people of ZancleZancle is the later Messene, modern Messina. in Sicily about this time sent messengers to Ionia inviting the Ionians to the Fair Coast, desiring there to found an Ionian city. This Fair Coast, as it is called, is in Sicily, in that part which looks towards Tyrrhenia. At thme to their country they would sail to a colony, rather than remain and be slaves of the Medes and Aeaces. The people of ZancleZancle is the later Messene, modern Messina. in Sicily about this time sent messengers to Ionia inviting the Ionians to the Fair Coast, desiring there to found an Ionian city. This Fair Coast, as it is called, is in Sicily, in that part which looks towards Tyrrhenia. At this invitation, the Samians alone of the Ionians, with those Milesians who had escaped, set forth.
Strabo, Geography, Book 6, chapter 1 (search)
their home. But according to Antiochus, the Zanclaeans sent for the Chalcidians and appointed Antimnestus their founder-in-chief.Zancle was the original name of Messana (now Messina) in Sicily. It was colonized and named Messana by the Peloponnesian Messenians (6. 2. 3). To this colony also belonged the refugees of the PeloponnMessina) in Sicily. It was colonized and named Messana by the Peloponnesian Messenians (6. 2. 3). To this colony also belonged the refugees of the Peloponnesian Messenians who had been defeated by the men of the opposing faction. These men were unwilling to be punished by the Lacedaemonians for the violation of the maidensCp. 6. 3. 3. and 8. 4. 9. which took place at Limnae, though they were themselves guilty of the outrage done to the maidens, who had been sent there for a religiouMessana by the Peloponnesian Messenians (6. 2. 3). To this colony also belonged the refugees of the Peloponnesian Messenians who had been defeated by the men of the opposing faction. These men were unwilling to be punished by the Lacedaemonians for the violation of the maidensCp. 6. 3. 3. and 8. 4. 9. which took place at Limnae, though they were themselves guilty of the outrage done to the maidens, who had been sent there for a religious rite and had also killed those who came to their aid.Cp. Paus. 4.4.1 So the refugees, after withdrawing to Macistus, sent a deputation to the oracle of the god to find fault with Apollo and Artemis if such was to be their fate in return for their trying to avenge those gods, and also to enquire how they, now utterly ruined, migh
M. Tullius Cicero, Divinatio against Q. Caecilius (ed. C. D. Yonge), chapter 4 (search)
esent, beg and entreat you, O judges, not to let your judgment differ from their judgment in selecting an advocate for their cause. Deputations from every city in the whole of Sicily, except two, Cicero means Syracuse and Messana, which did not join in the outcry against Verres, because Verres had resided at Syracuse, and had enriched that city with some of the plunder which he had taken from other cities; and he had treated MessMessana in the same way, which place he had made the repository of his plunder till he could export it to Italy. are present; and if deputations from those two were present also, two of the very most serious of the crimes would be lessened in which these cities are implicated with Caius Verres. But why have they entreated this protection from me above all men? If it were doubtful whether they had entreated it from me or not, I could tell why they h
M. Tullius Cicero, Against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge), section 27 (search)
olen by any one? Is not all the expectation of the judges fixed on the documents or on the witnesses? I said in the first pleading that I would make it plain that Caius Verres had carried off four hundred thousand sesterces contrary to the law. What ought I to have said? Should I have pleaded more plainly if I had related the whole affair thus?—There was a certain man of Halesa, named Dio, who, when a great inheritance had come to his son from a relation while Sacerdos was praetor, had at the time no trouble nor dispute about it. Verres, as soon as he arrived in the province, immediately wrote letters from Messana; he summoned Dio before him, he procured false witnesses from among his own friends to say that that inheritance had been forfeited to Venus Erycina. He announced that he himself would take cognisance of that matter
M. Tullius Cicero, Against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge), section 13 (search)
And though all this was done, yet know ye, that there was but one single city, that, namely, of the Mamertines, which by public resolution sent ambassadors to speak in his favour. But you heard the chief man of that embassy, the most noble man of that state, Caius Eleius, speak on his oath, and say, that Verres had had a transport of the largest size built at Messana, the work being contracted for at the expense of the city. And that same ambassador of the Mamertines, his panegyrist, said that he had not only robbed him of his private property, but had also carried away his sacred vessels, and the images of the Di Penates, which he had received from his ancestors, out of his house. A noble panegyric; when the one business of the ambassadors is discharged by two operations, praising the man and demanding back what has been
M. Tullius Cicero, Against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge), section 19 (search)
The very day on which he reached Sicily, (see now whether he was not come, according to that omen bruited about the city,) prepared to sweep This is another pun on the name of Verres, from its similarity in sound to the word verro, I sweep. the province pretty clean, he immediately sends letters from Messana to Halesa, which I suppose he had written in Italy. For, as soon as he disembarked from the ship, he gave orders that Dio of Halesa should come to him instantly; saying that he wished to make inquiry about an inheritance which had come to his son from a relation, Apollodorus Laphiro.
M. Tullius Cicero, Against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge), section 65 (search)
But, as I began to say, remark the miseries of the Sicilians. Heraclius, whom I have mentioned, and Epicrates came forward a great distance to meet me, with all their friends. When I came to Syracuse, they thanked me with tears; they wished to leave Syracuse, and go to Rome in my company: because I had many other towns left which I wanted to go to, I arranged with the men on what day they were to meet me at Messana. They sent a messenger to me there, that they were detained by the praetor. And though I summoned them formally to attend and give evidence,—though I gave in their names to Metellus,—though they were very eager to come, having been treated with the most enormous injustice, they have not arrived yet. These are the rights which the allies enjoy now, not to be allowed even to complain of their distresses.
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...