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John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 6 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 4 0 Browse Search
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Strabo, Geography, Book 6, chapter 2 (search)
rked off in sections and given in miles: from Pelorias to Mylae, twenty-five miles; the same from Mylae to Tyndaris; then to Agathyrnum thirty, and the same to Alaesa, and again the same to Cephaloedium, these being small towns; and eighteen to the River Himera,C. Müller (see Map V at the end of the Loeb volume) assumes that Strabo exchanged the Chorographer's distances between (1) Alaesa and Cephaloedium, and (2) Cephaloedium and the River Himera (see C. Müller, Ind. Var. Lect., p. 977). which flows through the middle of Sicily; then to Panormus thirty-five, and thirty-two to the Emporium of the Aegestes,In Latin, Emporium Segestanorum. and the rest of it was ruined by the long wars that arose one after another. The last and longest side is not populous either, but still it is fairly well peopled; in fact, Alaesa, Tyndaris, the Emporium of the Aegestes, and CephaloedisAnother name of Cephaloedium (6. 2. 1). are all cities, and Panormus has also a Roman settlement. Aegesta
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 723-732 (search)
Halaesus brings troops from the Auruncan and Oscan territories.
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2, P. VERGILI MARONIS, line 723 (search)
Hinc apparently means next, though Forb. understands it ex hac (alia) parte. Agamemnonius: Serv. says that Halaesus was variously represented as the bastard son and as the companion of Agamemnon. Virg. can hardly have considered him the former, unless he is inconsistent with himself 10. 417 foll., where he speaks of Halaesus' fatHalaesus' father in language that could not apply to Agamemnon. The epithet may well be used loosely, just as the Trojans are called Aeneadae. Whether any extant author speaks of Halaesus as Agamemnon's son is questionable. Ovid, who mentions him twice (3 Amor. 13. 31 foll., F. 4. 73 foll.), is not more express than Virg., unless we read AtridHalaesus as Agamemnon's son is questionable. Ovid, who mentions him twice (3 Amor. 13. 31 foll., F. 4. 73 foll.), is not more express than Virg., unless we read Atrides with Heins. in the latter passage. Ov. makes him the founder of Falerii (for the etymology see on v. 716 above), which is inconsistent with Virg. Troiani nominis like nomen Latinum.
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams), Book 7, line 723 (search)
Now Agamemnon's kinsman, cruel foe to the mere name of Troy, Halaesus, yokes the horses of his car and summons forth a thousand savage clans at Turnus' call : rude men whose mattocks to the Massic hills bring Bacchus' bounty, or by graybeard sires sent from Auruncan upland and the mead of Sidicinum; out of Cales came its simple folk; and dwellers by the stream of many-shoaled Volturnus, close-allied with bold Saticulan or Oscan swains. Their arms are tapered javelins, which they wear bound by a coiling thong; a shield conceals the left side, and they fight with crooked swords.
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams), Book 10, line 345 (search)
Next into the fight Clausus of Cures came, in youthful bloom exulting, and with far-thrown javelin struck Dryops at the chin, and took away from the gashed, shrieking throat both life and voice; the warrior's fallen forehead smote the dust; his lips poured forth thick blood. There also fell three Thracians, odspring of the lordly stem of Boreas, and three of Idas' sons from Ismara, by various doom struck down. Halaesus here his wild Auruncans brings; and flying to the fight comes Neptune's son, Messapus, famous horseman. On both sides each charges on the foe. Ausonia's strand is one wide strife. As when o'er leagues of air the envious winds give battle to their peers, well-matched in rage and power; and neither they nor clouds above, nor plunging seas below will end the doubtful war, but each withstands the onset of the whole—in such wild way the line of Trojans on the Latian line hurls itself, limb on limb and man on man