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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 8 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 4 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 4 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 4 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 4 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 21-30 2 0 Browse Search
Dinarchus, Speeches 2 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Hippolytus (ed. David Kovacs) 2 0 Browse Search
Plato, Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Phaedo 2 0 Browse Search
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Demosthenes, Against Timocrates, section 180 (search)
Again, men of Athens, consider those glorious and much-admired inscriptions that he has obliterated for all time, and the strange and blasphemous inscriptions that he has written in their stead. You all, I suppose, used to see the words written under the circlets of the crowns: “The Allies crowned the People for valor and righteousness,” or “The Allies dedicated to the Goddess of Athens a prize of victory”; or, from the several states of the Alliance, “Such-and-such a city crowned the People by whom they were delivered,” or “The liberated Euboeans,” for example, “crowned the People,” or again “Conon from the sea-fight with the Lacedaemonians,” “Chabrias from the sea-fight off Naxos.
Dinarchus, Against Demosthenes, section 75 (search)
again, this time of Athens, with the same points in mind. Our city was great, renowned in Greece, and worthy of our forbears, apart from the well-known exploits of the past, at the time when Conon triumphed, as our elders tell us, in the naval battle at Cnidus; when Iphicrates destroyed the Spartan company, when Chabrias defeated the Spartan triremes at sea off Naxos, when Timotheus won the sea battle off Corcyra.For the exploits of Conon and Timotheus compare Din. 1.14 and note. In 391 B.C. the Athenian general Iphicrates, on going to the relief of Corinth, surprised and almost annihilated a Spartan company. The defeat of the Spartan fleet by Chabrias took place in 376 and won supremacy in the Aegean for Athens for over fifty years (Xe
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XI, Chapter 49 (search)
Hieron removed the people of NaxosThe city north of Syracuse on the coast. and Catana from their cities and sent there settlers of his own choosing, having gathered five thousand from the Peloponnesus and added an equal number of others from Syracuse; and the name of Catana he changed to Aetna, and not only the territory of Catana but also much neighbouring land which he added to it he portioned out in allotments, up to the full sum of ten thousand settlers. This he did out of a desire, not only that he might have a substantial help ready at hand for any need that might arise, but also that from the recently founded state of ten thousand men he might receive the honours accorded to heroes. And the Naxians and Catanians whom he had removed from their native states he transferred to Leontini and commanded them to make their homes in that city along with the native population. And Theron, seeing that after the slaughter of the Himerans
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XIII, Chapter 4 (search)
an alliance; but the Himeraeans, Selinuntians, Geloans, and Catanaeans promised that they would fight at the side of the Syracusans. The cities of the Siceli, while tending to be favourably inclined toward the Syracusans, nevertheless remained neutral, awaiting the outcome. After the Aegestaeans had refused to give more than thirty talents,Cp. Book 12.83. the Athenian generals, having remonstrated with them, put out to sea from Rhegium with their force and sailed to Naxos in Sicily. They were kindly received by the inhabitants of this city and sailed on from there to Catane. Although the Catanaeans would not receive the soldiers into the city, they allowed the generals to enter and summoned an assembly of the citizens, and the Athenian generals presented their proposal for an alliance. But while Alcibiades was addressing the assembly, some of the soldiers burst open a postern-gate and broke into the city. It was by this cause tha
Euripides, Hippolytus (ed. David Kovacs), line 313 (search)
I shall: your suppliant hand commands my awe. Nurse I'm silent now. The word henceforth is yours. Phaedra Unhappy mother,Phaedra's mother was Pasiphaë, wife of Minos. She was cursed with an unnatural passion for a bull and gave birth to the Minotaur. what a love you felt! Nurse For the Cretan bull? Or what is this you mean? Phaedra And you, poor sister, Dionysus' bride.In the best known version of this story, Ariadne, who helped Theseus escape from the Labyrinth, was abandoned by him on Naxos and taken up by Dionysus. The version alluded to here reverses the order and makes her the unfaithful bride of Dionysus. Nurse What's wrong with you, daughter? Why defame your kin? Phaedra And I the third, how wretchedly I perish! Nurse I am astonished. Where will these words lead? Phaedra From far back, nothing recent, is my woe! Nurse Of what I wish to hear I'm no whit wiser. Phaedra Oh! Could you but say the words that I must say! Nurse I am no seer, to know what's hid from sight
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 5, chapter 34 (search)
Now the Naxians had no suspicion at all that it was they who were to be attacked by that force. However, when they learned the truth, they immediately brought inside their walls all that was in their fields, stored both meat and drink in case of a siege, and strengthened their walls. The Naxians, then, made all preparations to face the onset of war. When their enemies had brought their ships over from Chios to Naxos, it was a fortified city that they attacked, and for four months they besieged it. When the Persians had exhausted all the money with which they had come, and Aristagoras himself had spent much beside, they built a stronghold for the banished Naxians, and went off to the mainland in poor spirits since still more money was needed for the siege.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 6, chapter 96 (search)
When they approached Naxos from the Icarian sea and came to land (for it was Naxos which the Persians intended to attack first), the Naxians, remembering what had happened before,This probably refers to the Persian treatment of rebels, described in Hdt. 6.31 and 32. fled away to the mountains instead of waiting for them. The Persians enslaved all of them that they caught, and burnt their temples and their city. After doing this, they set sail for the other islands. When they approached Naxos from the Icarian sea and came to land (for it was Naxos which the Persians intended to attack first), the Naxians, remembering what had happened before,This probably refers to the Persian treatment of rebels, described in Hdt. 6.31 and 32. fled away to the mountains instead of waiting for them. The Persians enslaved all of them that they caught, and burnt their temples and their city. After doing this, they set sail for the other islands.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 7, chapter 154 (search)
the deathIn 498. of Cleandrus son of Pantares, who had been tyrant of Gela for seven years, and had been slain by a man of that city named Sabyllus, the sovereignty passed to Cleandrus' brother Hippocrates. While Hippocrates was tyrant, Gelon, a descendant of the ministering priest Telines, was one of Hippocrates' guard, as were Aenesidemus son of Pataecus and many others. In no long time he was appointed for his worth to be captain of the entire cavalry, for his performance had been preeminent while he served under Hippocrates in the assaults against Callipolis, Naxos, Zancle, Leontini, Syracuse, and many other of the foreigners' towns. None of these cities, with the exception of Syracuse, escaped enslavement by Hippocrates; the Syracusans were defeated in battle on the river Elorus. They were, however, rescued by the Corinthians and Corcyraeans, who made a peace for them on the condition that the Syracusans should deliver up to Hippocrates Camarina, which had formerly been theirs.
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Elis 2, chapter 13 (search)
By the side of Bycelus stands the statue of a man-at-arms, Mnaseas of Cyrene, surnamed the Libyan; Pythagoras of Rhegium made the statue. To Agemachus of Cyzicus from the mainland of Asia ... the inscription on it shows that he was born at Argos. Naxos was founded in Sicily by the Chalcidians on the Euripus. Of the city not even the ruins are now to be seen, and that the name of Naxos has survived to after ages must be attributed to Tisander, the son of Cleocritus. He won the men's boxing-matchNaxos has survived to after ages must be attributed to Tisander, the son of Cleocritus. He won the men's boxing-match at Olympia four times; he had the same number of victories at Pytho, but at this time neither the Corinthians nor the Argives kept complete records of the victors at Nemea and the Isthmus. The mare of the Corinthian Pheidolas was called, the Corinthians relate, Aura (breeze), and at the beginning of the race she chanced to throw her rider. But nevertheless she went on running properly, turned round the post, and, when she heard the trumpet, quickened her pace, reached the umpires first, realiz
Plato, Euthyphro, section 4c (search)
and eat at one's table. For the pollution is the same if you associate knowingly with such a man and do not purify yourself and him by proceeding against him. In this case, the man who was killed was a hired workman of mine, and when we were farming at Naxos, he was working there on our land. Now he got drunk, got angry with one of our house slaves, and butchered him. So my father bound him hand and foot, threw him into a ditch, and sent a man here to Athens to ask the religious adviser what he ought
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