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Polybius, Histories 46 0 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 34 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 28 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 20 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 12 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 10 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More) 4 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 2 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, The fourteen orations against Marcus Antonius (Philippics) (ed. C. D. Yonge) 2 0 Browse Search
Plato, Letters 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Strabo, Geography. You can also browse the collection for Rhegium (Italy) or search for Rhegium (Italy) in all documents.

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Strabo, Geography, Book 6, chapter 1 (search)
ea, the sea which is called the Sicilian Sea. Rhegium was founded by the Chalcidians who, it is sailo bade them go forth with the Chalcidians to Rhegium, and to be grateful to his sister; for, he anaxilas (also spelled AnaxilaĆ¼s) was ruler of Rhegium from 494 to 476 B.C. (Diod. Sic. 11.48). werentium also took its name from the Morgetes of Rhegium.Cp. 6. 2. 4. The Latin name of this Sicilianto another Murgantia in Samnium. The city of Rhegium was once very powerful and had many dependenchich of the two explanations is true, whether Rhegium got its name on account of this or on accountt have called it by the Latin word for "royal,"Regium. because their progenitors had shared in the g it is now fairly populous. As one sails from Rhegium towards the east, and at a distance of fifty Locri first pitched camp. The distance from Rhegium to Locri is six hundred stadia. The city is ra. Timaeus says that Eunomus and Ariston of Rhegium were once contesting with each other at the P[5 more...]
Strabo, Geography, Book 6, chapter 2 (search)
made the voyage; so the Chalcidians founded Naxus, whereas the Dorians founded Megara, which in earlier times had been called Hybla. The cities no longer exist, it is true, but the name of Hybla still endures, because of the excellence of the Hyblaean honey. As for the cities that still endure along the aforementioned side: Messene is situated in a gulf of Pelorias, which bends considerably towards the east and forms an armpit, so to speak; but though the distance across to Messene from Rhegium is only sixty stadia, it is much less from Columna. Messene was founded by the Messenians of the Peloponnesus, who named it after themselves, changing its name; for formerly it was called Zancle, on account of the crookedness of the coast (anything crooked was called "zanclion"),The noun "zanclon" (corresponding to the adjective "zanclion") was a native Sicilian word, according to Thuc. 6.4. having been founded formerly by the Naxians who lived near Catana. But the Mamertini, a tribe of
Strabo, Geography, Book 6, chapter 3 (search)
mpania. And the common road from here on, as far as Rome, is called the Appian Way, and passes through Caudium,Now Montesarchio. Calatia,Now Galazze. Capua,The old Santa Maria di Capua, now in ruins; not the Capua of today, which is on the site of Casilinum. and Casilinum to Sinuessa.Now Mondragone. And the places from there on I have already mentioned. The total length of the road from Rome to Brentesium is three hundred and sixty miles. But there is also a third road, which runs from Rhegium through the countries of the Brettii, the Leucani, and the Samnitae into Campania, where it joins the Appian Way; it passes through the Apennine Mountains and it requires three or four days more than the road from Brentesium. The voyage from Brentesium to the opposite mainland is made either to the Ceraunian Mountains and those parts of the seaboard of Epeirus and of Greece which come next to them, or else to Epidamnus; the latter is longer than the former, for it is one thousand eight hu