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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 16 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 6 0 Browse Search
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 25, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
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Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
hilst he filed with nine divisions upon the extremity of the perpendicular face to the side of Schaffhausen, which brought him, in a few marches, to the gates of Augsburg, after the two detached divisions had already rejoined him. Napoleon, in 1806, had also the double base of the Main and the Rhine; forming almost a right reens essential, whilst the bulk of the army marches to great enterprises; thus the corps of Ney was the pivot of the manoeuvre which Napoleon made by Donauwerth and Augsburg, to cut off Mack from his line of retreat; this corps increased to five divisions, masked Ulm, and held the left bank of the Danube. The manoeuvre finished, theurrow Suabia in all directions; if it had been impracticable in a mountainous country, for want of transversal routes for making the long tour from Donanwerth by Augsburg upon Memmingen, it must be admitted also that, by favor of those hundred roads, Mack would equally have been able to make his retreat more easily than if he had
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Georgia, (search)
nt from Savannah to Fort Argyle on Ogeechee River, previously garrisoned by rangers......June, 1733 Public designation of town and wards with religious exercises; town court of record established, first session of magistrates held, and first jury in Georgia impanelled......July 7, 1733 Forty Jews arrive at Savannah, sent by the committee appointed by the trustees......July, 1733 Trustees prohibit rum in Georgia......Aug. 11, 1733 Forty-two families of Salzburgers, sent from Augsburg, Bavaria, by the Society for the Propagation of Christian Knowledge, settle at Ebenezer......March 17, 1734 Oglethorpe sails for England, leaving Thomas Causton in authority......April 7, 1734 Ten persons, under Rev. Gottlieb Spanzenberg, sent over from Saxony to begin a Moravian settlement in America, locate on north side of the Ogeechee River, near Fort Argyle......January, 1735 Fifty-nine Salzburgers under Mr. Vat, twenty-two British emigrants, and some Indian chiefs whom Oglethorp
I. founded the cotton, silk, and leather manufactures in Spain, about A. D. 930. He also devoted great attention to the sugarcane, rice, and the mulberry. This great Arabian people also taught Europe to make Chinese paper of pulped liber. It seems a pity that these gentlemen should be worsted by those gloomy tyrants, the Pedros and Philips, and that the liberality and civilization of Cordova should be superseded by the bigotry of Dominic. About the close of the seventeenth century, Augsburg became famous for the manufacture of its printed cottons and linens. About the same time, that is, in 1696, calico-printing was introduced into England from France, by one of the French victims of the revolution of the Edict of Nantes. He established works on the Thames, near Richmond. This villainous act of Louis XIV. inured to the benefit of other nations, especially England, who gave an asylum to many industrious artificers and artists. About twenty-five years afterwards, the linen,
evening the pendulum springs for chronometers. c is a draw-plate of metal for tube drawing. d are sections of wire of various shapes drawn through plates. e represents forms of pinion wire. f shows faney forms of wire used with others as pins in the surface of a wooden block used in calico-printing. The essential feature of wire-drawing is the drawplate. This was probably known at Nuremberg early in the fourteenth century, and how much before is not apparent. The History of Augsburg, 1351, and that of Nuremberg, 1360, mention the wire-drawer (Drahzieher). The draw-plate was imported into France by Archal, and into England by Schultz (1565). The drawplate is probably an Oriental invention. The draw-plate is made of a cylindrical piece of cast-steel, one side being flatted off. Several holes of graduated sizes are punched through the plate from the flat side, and the holes are somewhat conical in form. The wire is cleaned of its oxide in a tumbling-box, and is then a
the people of Nicomedia were too lazy to put out a fire in that city, and that they had no sipho. Strabo alludes to the siphones, which it appears were kept in a house, in preparation for accidental fire. Apollodorus, the architect of the bridge of Trajan across the Danube, mentions the sipho. Its construction seems to be unknown. Apollodorus recommends a leathern bag of water with hollow canes for discharging-nozzles. The first notice of the modern fire-engine is in the Chronicles of Augsburg, 1518, which speaks of the water-syringe useful at fires. They were mounted on wheels, and worked by levers. Similar devices are referred to by Lucar, 1590; Greatorix, 1656; and Morland, 1670. The fire-engine of Nuremberg described by Caspar Schott, 1657, was of a different character. It was mounted on a sled 4 × 10 feet, and drawn by two horses. It had a cistern 2 × 8 feet and 4 feet deep, in which were two horizontal cylinders. The brakes were worked by twenty-eight men, and the c
by water, were erected as early as the fourth century in Germany, on the river Roer. Stone, marble, and grain mills had been used many centuries previously in Pontus, Caria, and in Rome. Sawing-table. Saw-mills were driven by water at Augsburg in 1322. Indeed, a saw-mill with a complete selfaction and driven by a water-wheel is found in a Ms. of the thirteenth century, now in Paris. Saw-mills were erected by the Spaniards in the island of Madeira in 1420. Erected in Breslau, 1427the ground-wheels. Street-sweeper. Fig. 5989 has a pair of oblique brushes to gather a wide swath of dirt into a position to be swept up by the succeeding cylindrical brush. Ancient Rome had its cloacae, and so had its beautiful colony Augsburg; but the cleaning of streets, except in exceptional cases, as in the splendid capital of the Spanish Caliphs, Cordova, was in a beastly state of inefficiency. In Paris, in 1285, under Philip the Bold, an order was issued that each citizen sho
of a paper of the size of the New York Tribune, for instance. Hoe's web perfecting printing-machine. Fig. 7138 illustrates a web perfecting-press, made at Augsburg. The paper passes first through damping-rollers, adjustable to give any required degree of wetness, then through adjustable tension-rollers to the first type-cytch wheels are cast or stamped with webs and then crossed out; the web being perforated and filed till it assumes the form of a cross, having four spokes. The Augsburg (German) web printing-press. Wed′ding-knot. (Nautical.) A tie for uniting the looped ends of two ropes. a b, eyelets. c d, the join. e, the fas were called wire-smiths; but after the invention of drawing wire, they were called wire-drawers or wire-millers. Both these appellations occur in the history of Augsburg as early as the year 1351, and in that of Nuremberg in 1360; so that according to the best information I have been able to obtain, I must class the invention of
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
hers at home. Thus the Hallesche Nachrichaen, addressed to the Lutheran ministerium in Halle, carefully written with minute details by the Rev. Heinrich Melchior Muhlenberg, patriarch of the Lutheran church in America, and by other Lutheran ministers, give us an authentic picture not only of the beginnings and growth of the Lutheran Church in America but also of pioneer conditions in many of the colonies. Similarly the Urlsperger Nachrichten, addressed to the Rev. Dr. Samuel Urlsperger at Augsburg, give us an intimate view of the Salzburgers of Georgia and the beginnings of the Lutheran church in the South. The Diaries of Moravian missionaries (Brothers Schnell, Gottschalk, and Spangenberg), who visited the frontier settlements, travelling mostly on foot, from Western Pennsylvania, to the Valley of Virginia, and through trackless wastes to the western settlements of North Carolina, thence to the coast, in 1743-1748, are a wonderful record of modest courage and splendid sacrifice. D
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 2: 1827-1828: Aet. 20-21. (search)
on the belfry like broad daylight. On all sides extended a wide plain, unbroken by a single inequality, so far as the eye could distinguish, and cut by the Danube, glittering in the moonbeams. We crossed the plain during the night, and reached Augsburg at dawn. It is a beautiful city, but we merely stopped there for breakfast, and saw the streets only as we passed through them. On leaving Augsburg, the Tyrolean Alps, though nearly forty leagues away, were in sight. About eighteen leagues ofAugsburg, the Tyrolean Alps, though nearly forty leagues away, were in sight. About eighteen leagues off was also discernible an immense forest; of this we had a nearer view as we advanced, for it encircles Munich at some distance from the town. We arrived here on Sunday, the 4th, in the afternoon. . . . My address is opposite the Sendlinger Thor No. 37. I have a very pretty chamber on the lower floor with an alcove for my bed. The house is situated outside the town, on a promenade, which makes it very pleasant. Moreover, by walking less than a hundred yards, I reach the Hospital and the Anat
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Appendix III: translations of Mr. Longfellows works (search)
9. The Same. Übersetzt von Karl Knortz. Leipzig: n. d. Longfellow's Evangeline. Deutsch von Heinrich Viehoff. Trier: 1869. Die Goldene Legende. Deutsch von Karl Keck. Wien: 1859. Also Leipzig, 1860. The Same. Übersetzt von Elise Freifrau von Hohenhausen. Leipzig: 1880. Das Lied von Hiawatha. Deutsch von Adolph Bottger. Leipzig: 1856. The Same. Übersetzt von A. und K. Leitz. Hannover: 1859. Der Sang von Hiawatha. Übersetzt von Ferdinand Freiligrath. Stuttgart und Augsburg: 1857. Hiawatha. Übertragen von Hermann Simon. Leipzig: n. d. Der Sang von Hiawatha. Übersetzt, eingeleitet und erklart von Karl Knortz. Jena: 1872. Miles Standish's Brautwerbung. Aus dem Englischen von F. E. Baumgarten. St. Louis: 1859. Die Brautwerbung des Miles Standish. Übersetzt von Karl Knortz. Leipzig: 18—. Miles Standish's Brautwerbung. Übersetzt von F. Manefeld. 1867. Die Sage von Konig Olaf. Übersetzt von Ernst Rauscher. The Same. Übersetzt von W. He
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