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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 18 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 14 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 11 1 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 8 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Grant in peace: from Appomattox to Mount McGregor, a personal memoir 8 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 6 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 6 0 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Cologne (North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany) or search for Cologne (North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Consular service, the (search)
rom his family and in a most meagre manner to eke out existence upon the present allowance. So, too, in Europe, in such places as Liege, and Copenhagen, and Nice, and many others where the salary is $1,500 and the unofficial work yields hardly any return. These are only a few of the most glaring cases, but the position of a man without property of his own sufficient to make him practically independent of his salary so far as subsistence is concerned, who goes, for instance, to Trieste, Cologne, Dublin, or Leeds, or to Sydney, New South Wales, or to Guatemala, or Managua, or to Tamatave, Madagascar, or to Odessa, or Manila, or Beirut, or Jerusalem, on a salary of $2,000 is relatively little better off. Nor is the position of a consul at Buenos Ayres, or at Brussels, or at Marseilles, Hamburg, Sheffield, Nuevo Laredo, Athens, Ningpo, or Victoria, B. C., with a salary of $2,500 to be envied, with the necessary demands which he is obliged to meet. It is of course notorious that th
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ingulf, Rudolf 1727-1785 (search)
Ingulf, Rudolf 1727-1785 Traveller; born in Cologne in 1727; emigrated to Mexico in 1751, where he became a merchant. After securing a competence he travelled through Central America, Mexico, and California. He published, in the German language, Travels in New Spain; The Geologic formation of California, in which he proved that California was a rich gold-field; Cosmography of America, etc. He died in Vienna in 1785.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), International law, (search)
subjects or others; third, that whatever force the laws of one country have in another depends solely on the municipal laws of the latter. There have been numerous congresses of international law experts for the purpose of simplifying and making more definite the obligations which one country owes to another, and in these congresses the United States has occupied a conspicuous place. The Association for the Reform and Codification of the Law of Nations held its first session in Brussels, Oct. 10, 1873, and subsequent ones were held in Geneva, The Hague, Bremen, Antwerp, Frankfort, London, Berne, Cologne, Turin, and Milan. An Institute of International Law was organized in Ghent in 1873, and has since held numerous sessions in various cities of Europe, The most conspicuous action of the nations concerning the abolition of international hostilities was taken in the Peace Conference at The Hague, in 1899, to which the United States was also a party. See codes; field, David Dudley.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Schurz, Carl (search)
Schurz, Carl Military officer; born near Cologne, Germany, March 2, 1829; studied at the Gymnasium at Cologne and at the University of Bonn; with other students engaged in the revolutionary movements in 1848; joined Gottfried Kinkel in publishing a liberal newspaper; and, after the failure of an attempt at insurrection at Bonn (1849) both were compelled to fly. Schurz made his way to Switzerland. On the night of Nov. 6, 1850, he rescued Kinkel from the fortress of Spandau, escaped to the sCologne and at the University of Bonn; with other students engaged in the revolutionary movements in 1848; joined Gottfried Kinkel in publishing a liberal newspaper; and, after the failure of an attempt at insurrection at Bonn (1849) both were compelled to fly. Schurz made his way to Switzerland. On the night of Nov. 6, 1850, he rescued Kinkel from the fortress of Spandau, escaped to the sea, and took passage in a schooner for Leith. Thence Schurz went to Paris; thence to London, in 1851, where he was a teacher until the summer of 1852, when he came to the United States, landing at Philadelphia. There he remained three years, and then settled at Madison, Wis. In the Presidential campaign of 1856 he became a noted German orator, and in 1858 began to make public speeches in English. He soon afterwards became a lawyer at Milwaukee, and, in the winter of 1859-60 was recognized as
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Washington monument. (search)
ted at a cost of nearly $100,000, and the work was pushed actively forward until its completion, nine years later, under the direction of Col. T. L. Casey, United States Engineers. The entire cost of the monument was about $1,500,000, of which amount nearly $300,000 was contributed by the Washington monument Association. Its base is 55 feet square—the base of the foundation being 106 feet square and 38 feet deep. Its height is 555 feet, being 30 feet greater than that of the cathedral at Cologne, and 75 feet greater than that of the Great Pyramid. It is built of Maryland marble lined with blue gneiss. Various stones contributed by the States are built into the interior lining. Including the foundation, the weight of the structure is nearly 82,000 tons. The top of the monument is protected by a cap made of aluminum, which is not affected by the elements. The ascent can be made by an elevator or by an iron stairway of nearly 900 steps. The thickness of the walls at the base is