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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The principal voyages of the English Nation to the Isles of Trinidad, Margarita, Dominica , Deseada, Monserrate, Guadalupe , Martinino, and all the rest of the Antilles ; As likewise to S. Juan de Puerto Rico, to Hispaniola, Jamaica and Cuba : and also to Tierra Firma, and all along the coast and Islands therof, even from Cumana and the Caracos to the neckland of Dariene, and over it to the Gulfe of S. Michael and the Isle of Perles in the South sea: and further to Cabeca Cativa, Nombre de dios, and Venta de cruzes, to Puerto Belo, Rio de Chagre, and the Isle of Escudo, along the maine of Beragua, to the Cape and Gulfe of the Honduras, to Truxillo, Puerto de Cavallos, and all other the principall Townes, Islands and harbours of accompt within the said Gulfe, and up Rio dolce falling into this Gulfe, above 30. leagues : As also to the Isle of Cocumel, and to Cape Cotoche, the towne of Campeche , and other places upon the land of lucatan; and lower downe to S. Juan de Ullua, Vera Cruz, Rio de Panuco, Rio de Palmas, &c. within the Bay of Mexico: and from thence to the Isles of the Tortugas, the port of Havana , the Cape of Florida, and the Gulfe of Bahama homewards. With the taking, sacking, ransoming, or burning of most of the principall Cities and townes upon the coasts of Tierra firma, Nueva Espanna, and all the foresaid Islands; since the most traiterous burning of her Majesties ship the Jesus of Lubec and murthering of her Subjects in the port of S. Juan de Ullua, and the last generall arrest of her Highnesse people, with their ships and goods throughout all the dominions of the King of Spaine in the moneth of June 1585. Besides the manifold and tyrannicall oppressions of the Inquisition inflicted on our nation upon most light and frivolous occasions. (search)
e died. In the moneth of June 1593 we arrived at the island of Trinidad in the West Indies, hoping there to finde refreshing: but we coulnourable Gentleman M. Robert Duddeley, now knight, to the isle of Trinidad , and the coast of Paria: with his returne home by the Isles of Grster Abraham Kendall to shape his course directly for the isle of Trinidad in the West Indies; which after 22. dayes we descried, and the fihe kingdome of Yguirie, and right against the Northermost part of Trinidad , the maine was called The high land of Paria, the rest a very lowoa, we set saile to see further of the Indies, leaving the yle of Trinidad the 12. day of March. The 13. I tooke a small prize of sackes 25. I got nothing. Here follow certaine wordes of the language of Trinidad which I observed at my being there. Guttemock. A man. Tabairo, D 13 The isle of Trinidad upon the North side in 10 The isle of Granata in
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A briefe note of a voyage to the East Indies, begun the 10 of April 1591, wherein were three tall ships, the Penelope of Captaine Raimond, Admirall, the Merchant royall, whereof was Captaine, Samuel Foxcroft, Viceadmirall, the Edward Bonaventure, whereof was Captaine, M. James Lancaster, Rere-admirall, with a small pinnesse. Written by Henry May, who in his returne homeward by the West Indies, suffred shipwracke upon the isle of Bermuda , wherof here is annexed a large description. (search)
en, and some of them of his acquaintance, in such joy, that what betweene excessive sudden feare & joy, he became distracted of his wits, to our great sorowes. Here we found of his drying some 40 goats. The party had made him for want of apparell two sutes of goats skinnes with the hairy side outwards, like unto the Savages of Canada. Here we stayed all this moneth. This man lived untill we came to the West Indies, and then he died. In the moneth of June 1593 we arrived at the island of Trinidad in the West Indies, hoping there to finde refreshing: but we could not get any, by reason that the Spanyards had taken it. Here we were imbayed betweene the island and the maine; and for want of victuals the company would have forsaken the ship: whereupon the captaine was inforced to sweare every man not to forsake the ship untill we should see further occasion. Out of this bay, called Boca de Dragone, it pleased God to deliver us; from whence we directed our course for the isle of S. Ju
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A voyage of the honourable Gentleman M. Robert Duddeley, now knight, to the isle of Trinidad , and the coast of Paria: with his returne home by the Isles of Granata, Santa Cruz, Sant Juan de puerto rico, Mona , Zacheo, the shoalds called Abreojos, and the isle of Bermuda . In which voyage he and his company tooke and sunke nine Spanish ships, wherof one was an armada of 600 tunnes. Written at the request of M. Richard Hakluyt. (search)
A voyage of the honourable Gentleman M. Robert Duddeley, now knight, to the isle of Trinidad , and the coast of Paria: with his returne home by the Isles of Granata, Santa Cruz, Sant Juan de puerto rts of Africa , I caused my Master Abraham Kendall to shape his course directly for the isle of Trinidad in the West Indies; which after 22. dayes we descried, and the first of February came to an anme, the kingdom of Caribes, the kingdome of Yguirie, and right against the Northermost part of Trinidad , the maine was called The high land of Paria, the rest a very lowe land. Morucco I learned to watering our selves at Paracoa, we set saile to see further of the Indies, leaving the yle of Trinidad the 12. day of March. The 13. I tooke a small prize of sackes 25. leagues to the Northward of ich was losse to them, though I got nothing. Here follow certaine wordes of the language of Trinidad which I observed at my being there. Guttemock. A man. Tabairo, Dabarah, Or Dabarra. The heare
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Here follow the latitudes of the headlandes, Capes, and Islands, as well of Madera, The Canaries, and the West Indies, as of the Azores and the Isles of Cabo Verde. (search)
le Fuerte ventura in28 1/2 The Grand Canaria in28 1/2 The isle of Palma, and the point called Punta de Naga in Tenerif in28 1/2 The isle of Gomera in27 1/2 The latitudes of the Islands of the West Indies. Degrees of latitude. The island of Fonzeca standeth in 11 1/4 The isle Tabago in skant 11 The Barbudos in 13 The isle of Trinidad upon the North side in 10 The isle of Granata in 11 1/4 The isle of Sant Vincent in 12 The isle of santa Lucia in 12 3/4 The isle of Dominica in 14 The isle of Matalina or Martinino in 14 1/2 The isle of Marigalante in 15 The isle of Deseada in
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The discoverie of the large, rich, and beautifull Empire of Guiana, with a relation of the great and golden citie of Manoa (which the Spaniards call El Dorado) and the provinces of Emeria, Aromaia, Amapaia, and other countries, with their rivers adjoyning. Performed in the yeere 1595 by Sir Walter Ralegh Knight, Captaine of Her Majesties Guard, Lorde Warden of the Stanneries, and Her Highnesse Lieutenant Generall of the Countie of Corne-wall. (search)
pon the same enterprize, leaving my ships at Trinidad , at the Port called Curiapan, I wandred 400 is true that while we abode at the yland of Trinidad , I was informed, by an Indian, that not far which we framed in hast for that purpose at Trinidad , and those little boats had 9. or 10. men a not, we departed and directed our course for Trinidad with mine owne ship, and a small barke of cacame with us from Plimmouth :) we arrived at Trinidad the 22. of March, casting ancker at point Cuspannolles or Conquerabia . This yland of Trinidad hath the forme of a sheep-hooke, and is but eke the Edward Bonaventure, which arrived at Trinidad the day before from the East Indies: in whosrswaded that he should have come too late to Trinidad to have found us there (for the moneth was ehee fell downe from the river of Orenoque to Trinidad , and from thence to Margarita, and also to Se bottome of the bay, lying directly against Trinidad , a nation of inhumaine Canibals, which inhab
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Epistle Dedicatorie of sor Walter Ralegh to the right honourable the L. Charles Howard knight of the Garter &c. and sir Robert Cecil, Councellour &c. (search)
. I sent my servant Jacob Whiddon the yere before, to get knowledge of the passages, and I had some light from Captaine Parker, sometime my servant, and nowe attending on your Lordship, that such a place there was to the Southward of the great Bay of Charuas, or Guanipa: but I found that it was 600 miles farther off then they supposed, and many other impediments to them unknowen and unheard. After I had displanted Don Antonio de Berreo, who was upon the same enterprize, leaving my ships at Trinidad , at the Port called Curiapan, I wandred 400 miles into the said countrey by lande and river: the particulars I will leave to the following discourse. The countrey hath more quantity of gold by manifolde, then the best partes of the Indies, or Peru : All the most of the kings of the borders are already become her Majesties vassals: and seeme to desire nothing more then her Majesties protection and the returne of the English nation. It hath another ground and assurance of riches and glory, t
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Epistle of sir Walter Ralegh to the reader (search)
er of her Majesties Mint, hath given out that the same is of no price, I have thought good by the addition of these lines to give answer aswel to the said malicious slander, as to other objections. It is true that while we abode at the yland of Trinidad , I was informed, by an Indian, that not far from the Port, where we ancored, there were found certaine mineral stones which they esteemed to be gold, & were thereunto perswaded the rather for that they had seene both English and Frenchmen gatheswiftnes, as wee drave downe most commonly against the wind, little lesse than 100. miles a day: Besides our vessels were no other then whirries, one little barge, a small cockboat, and a bad Galiota, which we framed in hast for that purpose at Trinidad , and those little boats had 9. or 10. men a piece, with all their victuals, and armes. It is further true, that we were about 400. miles from our ships, and had bene a moneth from them, which also we left weakly manned in an open road, and had
dayes wee found them not, we departed and directed our course for Trinidad with mine owne ship, and a small barke of captaine Crosses onely ast of Spaine, which came with us from Plimmouth :) we arrived at Trinidad the 22. of March, casting ancker at point Curiapan, which the Spaps at Puerto de los Espannolles or Conquerabia . This yland of Trinidad hath the forme of a sheep-hooke, and is but narrow, the North pararted from them to seeke the Edward Bonaventure, which arrived at Trinidad the day before from the East Indies: in whose absence Berreo senteston had not bene perswaded that he should have come too late to Trinidad to have found us there (for the moneth was expired which I promisse: and so in canoas hee fell downe from the river of Orenoque to Trinidad , and from thence to Margarita, and also to Saint Juan de puerto right hand of us in the bottome of the bay, lying directly against Trinidad , a nation of inhumaine Canibals, which inhabite the rivers of Gua
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, An abstract taken out of certaine Spaniards letters concerning Guiana and the countries lying upon the great river Orenoque : with certaine reports also touching the same. (search)
sarie munition, he issued out at the Iland Margarita, and from thence peopled Trinidad . But now they have sent me to learne out and discover the wayes most easily te came of late certaine Letters from a new discovered countrey not farre from Trinidad , which they write, hath Golde in great abundance: the newes seemeth to bee ve The report of a French man called Bountillier of Sherbrouke, concerning Trinidad and Dorado.HE saith that beeing at Trinidad in 1591. he had of an Indian theTrinidad in 1591. he had of an Indian there a peece of Golde of a quarter of a pound in exchange of a knife; the sayde Indian tolde him hee had it at the head of that river which commeth to Paracoa in TriniTrinidad : and that within the River of Orenoque, it was in great abundance. Also in 1593. beeing taken by the Spanyardes, and brought prisoner into the Iland of Madera (iver runneth farre into the land, in many places very broad, and that Anth. de Berreo lay at Trinidad , making head to goe to conquere and people the sayd Dorado.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Letters taken at sea by Captaine George Popham. 1594. (search)
of golde, discovered the royall Provinces of Guiana and Dorado: of the which he tooke possession to governe the same, but through want of his peoples health, and necessarie munition, he issued out at the Iland Margarita, and from thence peopled Trinidad . But now they have sent me to learne out and discover the wayes most easily to enter, and to people the said Provinces, and where the campes and armies may best enter the same. By reason wherof I intend so to doe in the name of his Majestie, The Letter of George Burien Britton from the sayde Canaries unto his cousin a Frenchman dwelling in S. Lucar, concerning El Dorado.SIR, and my very good cousin, there came of late certaine Letters from a new discovered countrey not farre from Trinidad , which they write, hath Golde in great abundance: the newes seemeth to bee very certaine, because it passeth for good amongst the best of this Citie. Part of the information of the Discovery that went to his Majestie, goeth inclosed in Alonsos
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