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hat of Newfound land, and of all these so great store, as may suffice to serve our whole realme. Besides all this, if credit may be given to the inhabitants of the same soile, a certaine river doth thereunto adjoyne, which leadeth to a place abounding with rich substance: I doe not hereby meane the passage to the Moluccaes, whereof before I made mention. And it is not to be omitted, how that about two yeeres past, certaine merchants of S. Malo in France, did hyre a ship out of the Island of Jersey, to the ende that they would keepe that trade secret from their Countreymen, and they would admit no mariner, other then the ship boy belonging to the sayd ship, to goe with them, which shippe was about 70. tunne. I doe know the shippe and the boy very well, and am familiarly acquainted with the owner, which voyage prooved very beneficiall. To conclude, this which is already sayd, may suffice any man of reasonable disposition to serve for a taste, untill such time as it shall please
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The fift chapter sheweth, that the trading and planting in those countreis is likely to prove to the particular profit of all adventurers. (search)
hat of Newfound land, and of all these so great store, as may suffice to serve our whole realme. Besides all this, if credit may be given to the inhabitants of the same soile, a certaine river doth thereunto adjoyne, which leadeth to a place abounding with rich substance: I doe not hereby meane the passage to the Moluccaes, whereof before I made mention. And it is not to be omitted, how that about two yeeres past, certaine merchants of S. Malo in France, did hyre a ship out of the Island of Jersey, to the ende that they would keepe that trade secret from their Countreymen, and they would admit no mariner, other then the ship boy belonging to the sayd ship, to goe with them, which shippe was about 70. tunne. I doe know the shippe and the boy very well, and am familiarly acquainted with the owner, which voyage prooved very beneficiall. To conclude, this which is already sayd, may suffice any man of reasonable disposition to serve for a taste, untill such time as it shall please
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A briefe and summary discourse upon the intended voyage to the hithermost parts of America : written by Captaine Carlile in April, 1583. for the better inducement to satisfie such Merchants of the Moscovian companie and others, as in disbursing their money towards the furniture of the present charge, doe demand forthwith a present returne of gaine, albeit their said particular disbursements are required but in very slender summes, the highest being 25. li. the second at 12. li. 10. s. and the lowest at 6. pound five shillings. (search)
many trifling things, which were of great value with them, they are as (I sayde) within these two or three yeeres content againe to admit a traffique, which two yeeres since was begunne with a small barke of thirtie tunnes, whose returne was found so profitable, as the next yeere following, being the last yeere, by those Marchants, who meant to have kept the trade secret unto themselves, from any others of their owne Countrey men, there was hired a shippe of fourescore tunnes out of the Isle of Jersey, but not any one Mariner of that place, saving a ship boy. This shippe made her returne in such sorte, as that this yeere they have multiplyed three shippes, to wit, one of nine score tunnes, another of an hundreth tunnes, and a third of foure score tunnes: which report is given by very substantiall and honest men of Plimmouth, who sawe the sayd shippes in readinesse to depart on their voyage, and were aboord of some of them. Here is at this instant in the towne a man of Gernsey, L
rdinance; and Mr. Read of S. C. seconded the motion. The question was put in this form: Shall the words moved to be stricken out stand? and on this question the Ays and Noes were required and taken, with the following result: N. Hamp Mr. Foster ay, Ay.   Mr. Blanchard ay, Massachu Mr. Gerry ay, Ay.   Mr. Partridge ay, R. Island Mr. Ellery ay, Ay.   Mr. Howell ay, Connect Mr. Sherman ay, Ay.   Mr. Wadsworth ay, New York Mr. De Witt ay, Ay.   Mr. Paine ay, N. Jersey Mr. Dick ay, No vote. By the Articles of Confederation, two or more delegates were required to be present to cast the vote of a State. New Jersey, therefore, failed to vote. Pennsyl Mr. Mifflin ay, Ay.   Mr. Montgomery ay,   Mr. Hand ay, Maryland Mr. Henry no, No.   Mr. Stone no, Virginia Mr. Jefferson ay, No.   Mr. Hardy no,   Mr. Mercer no, N. Carolina Mr. Williamson ay, Divided.   Mr. Spaight no, S. Carolina Mr. Read no, No.   Mr. Beresford n
Twentieth 26 141 -- 167 3d Wisconsin Williams's Twentieth 15 96 -- 111 Pickett's Mills, Ga.             May 27, 1864.             49th Ohio Wood's Fourth 52 147 4 203 89th Illinois Wood's Fourth 16 71 67 154 41st Ohio Wood's Fourth 26 70 6 102 15th Ohio Wood's Fourth 19 64 19 102 5th Kentucky Wood's Fourth 14 58 10 82 15th Wisconsin Wood's Fourth 14 41 28 83 1st Ohio Wood's Fourth 10 73 -- 83 Hawes's Shop, Va.             May 28, 1864.             1st N. Jersey Cavalry Gregg's Cavalry 7 53 3 63 5th Michigan Cavalry Torbert's Cavalry 8 42 -- 50 1st Penn. Cavalry Gregg's Cavalry 10 32 -- 42 10th N. York Cavalry Gregg's Cavalry 13 27 2 42 6th Mich. Cavalry Torbert's Cavalry 3 22 8 33 6th Ohio Cavalry Gregg's Cavalry 9 24 2 35 Totopotomoy, Va.             May 29-31, 1864.             36th Wisconsin (4 Cos.) Gibbon's Second 20 108 38 166 7th New York H. A. Barlow's Second 22 97 16 135 2d New Y
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Andros, Sir Edmund, -1714 (search)
4 Born in London, Dec. 6, 1637. In 1674 he succeeded his father as bailiff of Guernsey Island. In the same year he was appointed governor of the province of New York. He administered public affairs wholly in the interest of his master, the Duke of York. His private life was unblemished; but such was his public career that he acquired the title of tyrant. Andros became involved in serious disputes with the colonists. In 1680 he deposed Philip Carteret, and seized the government of East Jersey. The next year he was recalled, and retired to Guernsey, after having cleared himself of several charges that had been preferred against him. The New England governments were consolidated in 1686, and Andros was appointed governor-general. Under instructions, he forbade all printing in those colonies He was authorized to appoint and remove his own council, and with their consent to enact laws, levy taxes, and control the militia. These privileges were exercised in a despotic manner, a
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barclay, Robert, 1648-1690 (search)
published, in Latin and English, An apology for the true Christian Divinity, as the same is held forth and preached by the people called, in scorn, Quakers. Barclay dedicated it to King Charles, with great modesty and independence, and it was one of the ablest defences of the doctrines of his sect. His writings attracted public sympathy to his co-religionists. The first remonstrance of Friends against war was put forth by Barclay in 1677, entitled a Treatise on universal love. Barclay made many religious journeys in England, Holland, and Germany with William Penn, and was several times imprisoned on account of the promulgation of his doctrines. Charles II. was Barclay's friend through the influence of Penn, and made his estate at Ury a free barony in 1679, with the privilege of criminal jurisdiction. He was one of the proprietors of East Jersey, and in 1682 he was appointed its governor (see New Jersey) ; but he exercised the office by a deputy. He died in Ury, Oct. 13, 1690.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burr, Aaron, 1716- (search)
Burr, Aaron, 1716- educator; born in Fairfield, Conn., Jan. 4, 1716; was of German descent; graduated at Yale College in 1735; and ordained by the presbytery of east Jersey in 1737. He became pastor at Newark. N. J., where he was chiefly instrumental in founding the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), and was elected its president in 1748. In 1752 he married a daughter of Jonathan Edwards, the metaphysician. In 1754 he accompanied Whitefield to Boston. He died Sept. 24, 1757. Vice-President of the United States; born at Newark. N. .J., Feb. 6, 1756; a son of Rev. Aaron Burr, President of the College of New Jersey, and of a daughter of the eminent theologian, Jonathan Edwards. When nineteen years of age, he entered the Continental army, at Cambridge, as a private soldier, and as such accompanied Arnold in his expedition to Quebec. From the line of that expedition, in the wilderness. Arnold sent him with despatches to General Montgomery, at Montreal, w
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Carteret, Sir George 1599- (search)
9- English naval officer; born in St. Ouen, Jersey, in 1599. Charles I. appointed him governor of the Island of Jersey; and when the civil war broke out he was comptroller of the navy, and esteeme. Leaving the sea, he went with his family to Jersey, but soon afterwards returned to help his royad a baronet, and returned to his government of Jersey, where he received and sheltered the Prince ofich, in gratitude for his services in the Island of Jersey, was called New Jersey. Carteret retainel New Jersey. Philip Carteret, governor of east Jersey, denied it, and the two governors were in om to forbear exercising any jurisdiction in east Jersey, and announced that he should erect a fort his widow after his death. The Friends, of west Jersey, had already presented their complaints agaghtly claimed. This decided the matter for east Jersey also, and in August and October, 1680, the st and October, 1680, the duke signed documents relinquishing all rights over east and west Jersey.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Fenwick, John 1618-1683 (search)
Fenwick, John 1618-1683 Quaker colonist; a founder of the colony of West Jersey; born in England in 1618; obtained a grant of land in the western part of New Jersey in 1673; emigrated thither in 1675; and settled in Salem. His claim was resisted by Governor Andros, of New York, and he was arrested and cast into jail, where he remained about two years. He subsequently conveyed his claim to West Jersey to William Penn. He died in England in 1683. Fenwick, John 1618-1683 Quaker colonist; a founder of the colony of West Jersey; born in England in 1618; obtained a grant of land in the western part of New Jersey in 1673; emigrated thither in 1675; and settled in Salem. His claim was resisted by Governor Andros, of New York, and he was arrested and cast into jail, where he remained about two years. He subsequently conveyed his claim to West Jersey to William Penn. He died in England in 1683.
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