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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The maner of the taking of two Spanish ships laden with quicksilver & the Popes bulles, bound for the West Indies, by M. Thomas White in the Amity of London. 1592. (search)
nes of excellent wines, we brought shortly after into the river of Thames up to Blacke-wall. By the taking of this quicksilver, about 1400 chests, the king of Spaine loseth for every quintall of the same a quintall of silver, that should have beene delivered him by the masters of the mines there, which amounteth to 600000 pounds. More by taking of his bulles, to wit, two millions and 72 thousand for living and dead persons for the provinces of Nova Hispania, Iucatan, Guatimala, the Honduras , and the Phillipinas, taxed at two reals the piece. And more for eighteene thousand bulles taxed at foure reals, amounteth all to 107700 pounds. Summa totalis 707700 li. More there were taken ten fardels of gilt missals and breviaries sent for the kings account. So the hinderance that the king receiveth by the losse of his bulles and quicksilver amounteth as is abovesaid: besides the lacking of his wines, about 100 tunnes, whereby his fleet is disappointed of a great part of thei
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Divers voyages made by Englishmen to the famous Citie of Mexico, and to all or most part of the other principall provinces, cities, townes and places throughout the great and large kingdom of New Spaine, even as farre as Nicaragua and Panama, & thence to Peru : together with a description of the Spaniards forme of government there: and sundry pleasant relations of the maners and customes of the natural inhabitants, and of the manifold rich commodities & strange rarities found in those partes of the continent: & other matters most worthy the observation. (search)
or all the Spanish merchants that then traded in the South sea: for from this port they use to imbarke all their goods that goe for Peru , and to the kingdome of Honduras . From Guaxaca I came to a towne named Nixapa, which standeth upon certaine very high hilles in the province of Sapotecas, wherein inhabit about the number of tI bestowed that which I caried in annile (which is a kinde of thing to die blew withall) which I caried with me to the port of Cavallos, lying in the kingdome of Honduras , which port is a mighty huge gulfe, and at the comming in on the one side of it there lieth a towne of little force without ordinance or any other strength, haviin small frigats, is a certeine wood called campeche, (wherewith they use to die) as also hides and annile. By this there lieth the province of Iucatan, nere the Honduras by the North sea coast, where there is also another bishop, and a towne likewise named Iucatan, where there dwell a few Spanyards. They have no force at all i
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A notable discourse of M. John Chilton, touching the people, maners, mines, cities, riches, forces, and other memorable things of New Spaine, and other provinces in the West Indies, seene and noted by himselfe in the time of his travels, continued in those parts, the space of seventeene or eighteene yeeres. (search)
or all the Spanish merchants that then traded in the South sea: for from this port they use to imbarke all their goods that goe for Peru , and to the kingdome of Honduras . From Guaxaca I came to a towne named Nixapa, which standeth upon certaine very high hilles in the province of Sapotecas, wherein inhabit about the number of tI bestowed that which I caried in annile (which is a kinde of thing to die blew withall) which I caried with me to the port of Cavallos, lying in the kingdome of Honduras , which port is a mighty huge gulfe, and at the comming in on the one side of it there lieth a towne of little force without ordinance or any other strength, haviin small frigats, is a certeine wood called campeche, (wherewith they use to die) as also hides and annile. By this there lieth the province of Iucatan, nere the Honduras by the North sea coast, where there is also another bishop, and a towne likewise named Iucatan, where there dwell a few Spanyards. They have no force at all i
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The principal voyages of the English Nation to the Isles of Trinidad, Margarita, Dominica , Deseada, Monserrate, Guadalupe , Martinino, and all the rest of the Antilles ; As likewise to S. Juan de Puerto Rico, to Hispaniola, Jamaica and Cuba : and also to Tierra Firma, and all along the coast and Islands therof, even from Cumana and the Caracos to the neckland of Dariene, and over it to the Gulfe of S. Michael and the Isle of Perles in the South sea: and further to Cabeca Cativa, Nombre de dios, and Venta de cruzes, to Puerto Belo, Rio de Chagre, and the Isle of Escudo, along the maine of Beragua, to the Cape and Gulfe of the Honduras, to Truxillo, Puerto de Cavallos, and all other the principall Townes, Islands and harbours of accompt within the said Gulfe, and up Rio dolce falling into this Gulfe, above 30. leagues : As also to the Isle of Cocumel, and to Cape Cotoche, the towne of Campeche , and other places upon the land of lucatan; and lower downe to S. Juan de Ullua, Vera Cruz, Rio de Panuco, Rio de Palmas, &c. within the Bay of Mexico: and from thence to the Isles of the Tortugas, the port of Havana , the Cape of Florida, and the Gulfe of Bahama homewards. With the taking, sacking, ransoming, or burning of most of the principall Cities and townes upon the coasts of Tierra firma, Nueva Espanna, and all the foresaid Islands; since the most traiterous burning of her Majesties ship the Jesus of Lubec and murthering of her Subjects in the port of S. Juan de Ullua, and the last generall arrest of her Highnesse people, with their ships and goods throughout all the dominions of the King of Spaine in the moneth of June 1585. Besides the manifold and tyrannicall oppressions of the Inquisition inflicted on our nation upon most light and frivolous occasions. (search)
ng in the mouth of the great bay, called the Honduras . And within two dayes next after our arrivalfe, to the towne of Truxillio, in the bay of Honduras , which towne they surprised, and had thereinn the skiffe (being 8 persons) in the bay of Honduras : what became of them afterward God knoweth. n the coast of Hispaniola, within the bay of Honduras , and other places, 3. townes, and 19. saile , whereof eight were taken in the bay of the Honduras ; of all which we brought but two into Englannd to be of Puerto de Cavallos in the bay of Honduras , laden with tanned hides, salsa perilla, Inda, the rest of the fleete being gone for the Honduras . They were in all 60 sailes sent onely to mefirma, to the Ile of Jamaica, the bay of the Honduras , 30 leagues up Rio Dolce, and homewarde by Nbut not finding her, we went for the cape of Honduras , where wee purposed to intrap the watch, and and to have returned overland to the bay of Honduras . But this our diligence tooke no effect, bec[9 more...]
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of Master Andrew Barker of Bristol, with two ships, the one called the Ragged staffe, the other the Beare, to the coast of Terra firma, and the Bay of Honduras in the West Indies, in the yeere 1576. Wherein the reasons are premised which mooved him to set forth this voyage against the Spaniards: collected out of certaine notes and examinations touching this enterprise by M. Richard Hakluyt. (search)
ad surprised. From hence (by the direction of certain Indians) we sayled into the gulfe of the Honduras : there we tooke a barke wherin were rials of plate, to the value of 100 pound, Maiz or Indian , we arrived at an Island called S. Francisco, being in the mouth of the great bay, called the Honduras . And within two dayes next after our arrivall there, William Coxe and divers others (which forancisco) with certaine others of our men in a skyffe, to the towne of Truxillio, in the bay of Honduras , which towne they surprised, and had therein wine and oyle as much as they would, and divers oimselfe : so for haste they left those that were in the skiffe (being 8 persons) in the bay of Honduras : what became of them afterward God knoweth. Hereupon we determined to saile for England , and sle of Silly neere Cornwall where we left our Frigat which we built new upon the shore of the Honduras , having in her at our landing ten botisios of oyle, and the foure cast Peeces that were in Joh
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A true report of a voyage undertaken for the West Indies by M. Christopher Newport Generall of a fleete of three shippes and a pinnesse, viz. The golden Dragon Admirall, whereof was Captaine M. Newport himselfe; The Prudence Vice-admirall, under the conduct of Captaine Hugh Merrick; The Margaret under Captaine Robert Fred; and The Virgin our pinnesse under Captaine Henry Kidgil: Begun from London the 25. of Januarie 1591. Written by M. John Twitt of Harewich, Corporall in the Dragon. In which voyage they tooke and burnt upon the coast of Hispaniola, within the bay of Honduras , and other places, 3. townes, and 19. saile of shippes and frigats. (search)
Harewich, Corporall in the Dragon. In which voyage they tooke and burnt upon the coast of Hispaniola, within the bay of Honduras , and other places, 3. townes, and 19. saile of shippes and frigats. THE 12. daye of Februarie An. 1591. we set saile frf their cowardly brags wee also set on fire. Being thus frustrated of our pretended voyage, we stoode for the bay of Honduras , and about the ninth of May we discovered in the afternoone a saile thwart of the bay of Truxillo, with whom we stoode, voyage we tooke and sacked foure townes, seventeene frigats, and two ships, whereof eight were taken in the bay of the Honduras ; of all which we brought but two into England : the rest we sunke, burnt, and one of them we sent away with their men. And to make up the full number of twenty, the Spanyards themselves set one on fire in the bay of the Honduras , lest we should be masters of it. We shaped our course from Florida homeward by the isle of Flores one of the Azores , where we water
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage made to the bay of Mexico by M. William King Captaine, M. Moore, M. How, and M. Boreman Owners, with the Salomon of 200 tunnes, and the Jane Bonaventure of 40 tunnes of Sir Henry Palmer, from Ratcliffe the 26 of January 1592. (search)
Limehouse captaine of the Cantar of Weymouth. All we being heere together espied a ship of some 50 tunne, which we chased with their boats; but my shallope first boorded her, and tooke her: which had in her sacke, Canary-wine, muscadell, tent in jarres, and good store of oile in jarres. The ship we unladed and burned: the men ran on shore. Hence wee came all together, being about 13 sailes, before Havana ; but passing by we gave chase to a ship of 60 tun, which entred into an harbour a league to the Northwest of Havana, which with boats was boorded, and found to be of Puerto de Cavallos in the bay of Honduras , laden with tanned hides, salsa perilla, Indico, raw hides, and good store of balsamum : and she had foure chests of gold, which they got on land before we could come to them. We brought this ship into England . Thus spending a sevennight in lying off and on for purchase, and finding nothing come, I set saile for England , and arrived at Dover about the tenth of November 1592.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage truely discoursed, made by sir Francis Drake, and sir John Hawkins, chiefly pretended for some speciall service on the Islands and maine of the West Indies, with sixe of the Queenes ships, and 21 other shippes and barkes, containing 2500 men and boyes, in the yeere 1595. In which voyage both the foresayd knights died by sicknesse. (search)
of Pinos, which we saw the first of March. It is a low land with wood and fresh water to the Western end. If you come in with the middest of it you shall see rise up above the rest of the land 8 or 9 round homockes, and the Westermost hath three in one. Being shot foorth with the West end, and standing in for to water we espied 20 sayle of ships about one in the afternoone. This was a third part of the fleete which the king sent for Carthagena, the rest of the fleete being gone for the Honduras . They were in all 60 sailes sent onely to meete our fleete, being commanded wheresoever they heard we were, to come upon us with all their three forces. This fleete which we met withall came standing for Cape de los Corrientes, and had bene refreshed at Havana. As soone as they discried us, they kept close upon a tacke, thinking to get the winde of us: but we weathered them. And when our Admirall with all the rest of our fleet were right in the winds eye of them, sir Thomas Baskervil pu
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A true relation of the voyage undertaken by Sir Anthony Sherley Knight in Anno 1596. intended for the Ile of San Tome, but performed to S. Iago, Dominica , Margarita, along the coast of Tierra firma, to the Ile of Jamaica, the bay of the Honduras , 30 leagues up Rio Dolce, and homewarde by Newfoundland . With the memorable exploytes atchieved in all this voyage. (search)
no 1596. intended for the Ile of San Tome, but performed to S. Iago, Dominica , Margarita, along the coast of Tierra firma, to the Ile of Jamaica, the bay of the Honduras , 30 leagues up Rio Dolce, and homewarde by Newfoundland . With the memorable exploytes atchieved in all this voyage.WE departed from Hampton the 23 of Aprill wiady to depart, M. captaine Parker of Plimmouth came into the rode in his ships boat the second of March, with whom our Generall consorted to goe for the bay of Honduras , where by his perswasion we had great hope of a very good voyage. And departing from Jamaica the 6 of March, we sailed to Cape de Corrientes in Cuba , to looke for a barke of M. Parkers for our better strength: but not finding her, we went for the cape of Honduras , where we purposed to entrap the watch, & so to sacke the towne of Truxillo, but the watch discovering us, made great fires, and the towne presently shot off a great piece, and answered with fires. Notwithstanding the next day
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A voyage of Master William Parker of Plimmouth gentleman, to Margarita, Jamaica , Truxillo, Puerto de Cavallos situate within the bay of Honduras , and taken by sir Anthony Sherley and him, as likewise up Rio dolce: with his returne from thence, and his valiant and happie enterprize upon Campeche the chiefe towne of Yucatan , which he tooke and sacked with sixe and fifty men, and brought out of the harbour a Frigat laden with the kings tribute, and surprized also the towne of Sebo. (search)
r William Parker of Plimmouth gentleman, to Margarita, Jamaica , Truxillo, Puerto de Cavallos situate within the bay of Honduras , and taken by sir Anthony Sherley and him, as likewise up Rio dolce: with his returne from thence, and his valiant and rom Jamaica the sixt of March, and resolved to set upon the strong towne of Truxillo neere the mouth of the bay of the Honduras . And having sayled to Cape de Corrientes upon Cuba , to seeke a barke of mine for our better strength; but not finding her, we went for the cape of Honduras , where wee purposed to intrap the watch, and so to have sacked the towne of Truxillo. But the watch discovering us, made great fires, and the towne presently shot off a great piece, and answered with fires. Nur selves in the South sea, and there for a time to have tried our fortune; and to have returned overland to the bay of Honduras . But this our diligence tooke no effect, because of the huge highnes of the mountaines, and the length of the way, bein
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