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G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army, Appendix. Oration at West Point. (search)
by yonder monument to Dade and his command,--when all fell, save three, without an attempt to retreat. At last came the Mexican War, to replace Indian combats and the monotony of the frontier service; and for the first time in many years the mass of the regular army was concentrated, and took the principal part in the battles of that remarkable and romantic war. Palo Alto, Resaca, and Fort Brown were the achievements of the regulars unaided; and as to the battles of Monterey, Buena Vista, Vera Cruz, Cerro Gordo, and the final triumphs in the valley, none can truly say that they could have been won without the regulars. When peace crowned our victories in the capital of the Montezumas, the army was at once dispersed over the long frontier and engaged in harassing and dangerous wars with the Indians of the plains. Thus thirteen long years were spent, until the present war broke out, and the mass of the army was drawn in, to be employed against a domestic foe. I cannot proceed to t
t. Moir, bound to the island of St. Thomas, the Trent being one of the regular mail and passenger lines of the British Royal Mail Steamship Company, running from Vera Cruz, via Havana, to St. Thomas, and thence to Southampton, England. We paid our passage money for the whole route from Havana to Southampton to the British consul aharacter they thought fit to assume. As respects the steamer in which they embarked, I ascertained in the Havana that she was a merchant vessel plying between Vera Cruz, the Havana, and St. Thomas, carrying the mail by contract. The agent of the vessel, the son of the British consul at Havana, was well aware of the character cinto off St. Thomas? I cannot remember now whether it was on the night of the 16th or on the morning of the 17th. I went on my way to Mexico, going to Havana, Vera Cruz, Tampico. On my return to Havana, on the 6th of November, I found that the San Jacinto had been to Havana from St. Thomas; that she had coaled there, and that t
, being promised aid by the rebels, should make an attack upon Mexico [which was afterwards made without their aid], for the purpose of establishing the empire of Maximilian, and that he should occupy New Orleans as a base of his operations, as Vera Cruz was not a harbor that could be safely occupied by a fleet, on account of its exposure to the northers. More in detail, the last part of the scheme was this: The Emperor was to assemble his fleet at Martinique under the pretence of blockadingerstood what that meant. There were no draught mules in Mexico, and there were substantially none in all the West India Islands. There were plenty of pack mules in Mexico, but heavy ordnance could not be carried on the back of pack mules from Vera Cruz to the capital. Scott had met with the same misadventure. The French Emperor wanted those mules to transport the munitions of war with which to besiege the city of Mexico. Now, I was honestly on the side of Mexico, and as I was making prep
A charge at Fort Donelson.--The following description of the gallant dash of Gen. Charles F. Smith, in the late desperate action at Fort Donelson, will be read with a thrill of admiration by every patriot. The distinguished reputation that Gen. Smith gained in the late Mexican war as a brilliant and accomplished officer, evinced on every battle-field from Vera Cruz to the city of Mexico, gave assurance that he was equal to any emergency that required the highest elements of a thoroughly educated, gallant, and patriotic officer: Gen. Smith is emphatically a fighting man, and as may be imagined, the events of the morning had tended to decrease in no measure his pugnacity. When he received his long-desired orders for an assault of the enemy's works, his eyes glistened with a fire which, could it have been seen by his maligners, would have left them in no doubt as to his private feelings in regard to the present contest. All the arrangements were complete by three o'clock, and
ars in close association with the General, considered this the best likeness. United States Military Academy, and was known to have been a some-time officer of the army, serving in Magruder's battery in Mexico during the campaign of Scott from Vera Cruz to the capital city. it was even intimated that he had won certain brevets there for service at Vera Cruz, Contreras, and Chapultepec, rising from the grade of second lieutenant to that of major within a period of eighteen months, but to theVera Cruz, Contreras, and Chapultepec, rising from the grade of second lieutenant to that of major within a period of eighteen months, but to the youthful sense all that was very ancient history, of a piece with the Peloponnesian War, for instance, and the mists of antiquity hung about the record and made its outlines very vague. To the young, ten years seems a great while, and during that period their reticent, rigid instructor had been quite out of touch with anything Military other than their cadet battalion or the gun details of the institute battery of 6-pounders, with human teams, which it was his duty to put through their evolut
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address on the character of General R. E. Lee, delivered in Richmond on Wednesday, January 19th, 1876, the anniversary of General Lee's birth (search)
tes were fortified camps and a continent the battle ground; to us that march on Mexico seems as small as it is, in fact, far off in time and space. But small and great are relative, and the little army of Scott which gathered on the sands of Vera Cruz was little in much the same sense as that other army, of Cortez, whose footsteps it followed, and whose prowess it rivaled. In that campaign Lee's soldiership first found fit field. It was he whose skill gave us the quick foothold of Vera Cruz. At Cerro Gordo and Contreras his was no mean part of the plan and its accomplishment. At the City of Mexico it was his soldier's eye and soldier's heart which saw and dared what Cortez had seen and dared before, to turn the enemy's strongest position, and assault as well by the San Cosme as by the Belen gateway, a movement greatly hazardous, but, once executed, decisive. In the endless roll of wars that campaign of Mexico must always remain to the judicious critic masterly in conceptio
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Chapter XX (search)
he Emperor's staff, to make known to the Emperor the views and purposes of the government and people of the United States in respect to Mexican affairs. Our conversation was without reserve on either side, and with the understanding that nothing said by me would be withheld from the Emperor. The principal of these staff-officers was the distinguished Admiral de la Graviere, who had commanded the French squadron in American waters in the early part of our Civil War and in the capture of Vera Cruz. This gallant and honest old sailor had reported to his government the exact truth about the enterprise which Napoleon had undertaken when he ordered the bombardment and capture of the Mexican seaport for the alleged purpose of collecting a French claim-namely, that he was no better able to collect that claim after the city was in his possession than he had been before, and that the conquest of Mexico by the operations of a large army would be necessary before any financial return could b
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army, Index (search)
v. 1, 310, 318, 319, 322, 325, 334; Nov. 2, 307, 319, 321, 325; Nov. 6, 310, 320, 333-335; Nov. 7, 320; Dec. 3, 327; Dec. 6, 327, 332, 333; Dec. 16, 327; Dec. 24, 327, 328, 334: Thomas, G. H., 252. Graviere, Adm. de la, bombards and captures Vera Cruz, 388; relations with Napoleon III, 388, 389; friendship for the United States, 388, 389 Gresham, Walter Q., Secretary of State, 503, 512 Griffin, Ga., Hood assembles militia at, 319 Guerrilla warfare, 234, 235; fears of, after Lee's surrrs. See Volunteers. Utah, Territory of, obstruction of rail-roads in, 512 V Valley Head, Ga., S. moves to, 161,162 Values, the law of, 533, 534 Vancouver Barracks, Wash., Gen. Otis commanding at, 510, 511 Vaughan, Maj., 99 Vera Cruz, Mex., French bombardment and capture of, 388 Veterans, difference between volunteers and, 142; the example of, 522 Vicksburg, Miss., S. seeks service at, 64-66; S. sends reinforcements to Grant at, 64, 90, 98, 110, 233; fall of, 70; importa
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arista, Mariano, 1802- (search)
e served in the Spanish army until June, 1821, when he joined the Mexican revolutionists. He rose rapidly to the rank of brigadier-general; and in June, 1833, he was made, by Santa Ana (q. v.), second in command of the Mexican army. Joining another leader in an unsuccessful revolt, he was expelled from Mexico, and came to the United States. In 1835 he returned, and was restored to his rank in the army, and made Judge of the Supreme Tribunal of War. He was taken prisoner by the French at Vera Cruz (Dec. 5, 1838), but was soon released on parole. In 1839 he became general-in-chief of the northern division of the army, and received the Cross of honor for defeating insurgents. Though only a military commander, he was for some time the real ruler of Mexico when Herrera was President in 1844. Commanding at the battles of Palo Alto and Resaca De La Palma (q. v.) in May, 1848, he was appointed Minister of War a month later. Within two years he suppressed seventeen revolts in Mexico; an
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
Resaca de la PalmaMay 9, 1846 Sonoma and Sonoma PassJune 15, 1846 MontereySept. 21-23, 1846 BracetaDec. 25, 1846 San GabrielJan. 8, 1847 The MesaJan. 9, 1847 EncarnacionJan. 23, 1847 Buena VistaFeb. 22 and 23, ChihuahuaFeb. 28, 1847 Vera Cruz (Surrendered)Mar. 20, 1847 AlvaradoApril 2, 1847 Cerro GordoApril 18, 1847 ContrerasAug. 20, 1847 ChurubuscoAug. 20, 1847 El Molino del ReySept. 8, 1847 ChapultepecSept. 12-14, 1847 PueblaSept. and Oct., 1847 HuamantlaOct. 9, 1847 Atli Resaca de la PalmaMay 9, 1846 Sonoma and Sonoma PassJune 15, 1846 MontereySept. 21-23, 1846 BracetaDec. 25, 1846 San GabrielJan. 8, 1847 The MesaJan. 9, 1847 EncarnacionJan. 23, 1847 Buena VistaFeb. 22 and 23, ChihuahuaFeb. 28, 1847 Vera Cruz (Surrendered)Mar. 20, 1847 AlvaradoApril 2, 1847 Cerro GordoApril 18, 1847 ContrerasAug. 20, 1847 ChurubuscoAug. 20, 1847 El Molino del ReySept. 8, 1847 ChapultepecSept. 12-14, 1847 PueblaSept. and Oct., 1847 HuamantlaOct. 9, 1847 Atli
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