Browsing named entities in Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation. You can also browse the collection for Poland (Poland) or search for Poland (Poland) in all documents.

Your search returned 27 results in 17 document sections:

1 2
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter of the Company of the Marchants adventurers to Russia unto George Killingworth, Richard Gray, and Henry Lane their Agents there, to be delivered in Colmogro or els where: sent in the John Evangelist. (search)
d to you to provide for our benefite. Which credite if you may by his meanes obtaine, or otherwise have, we would you bought as much Wexe principally as you may get. For if there be in that countrey so great quantitie, as we be informed there is, it will be the best commoditie we may have: for having that wholly in our hands, we may serve our owne countrey and others. Therefore seeing the Emperour doth minde, that such commodities as bee in his dominions shall not passe to Rie and Revel and Poland as they have done, but bee reserved for us: therefore we must so lay for it, that it may not ly upon their hands that have it to sell, alwayes having consideration in the price and time as our next dispatch may correspond. Whereof you may send a certaine advise, as well what you shall receive of credit, and to what quantitie, as also what wares are remaining in your hands: which together well considered, you may advertise us as well for how many hundreth tonnes we must provide fraight aga
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter of Thomas Alcocke to the worshipfull Richard Gray, and Henrie Lane Agents in Moscovia from Tirwill in Polonia , written in Tirwill the 26. of Aprill 1558. (search)
A letter of Thomas Alcocke to the worshipfull Richard Gray, and Henrie Lane Agents in Moscovia from Tirwill in Polonia , written in Tirwill the 26. of Aprill 1558.MY duety premised unto your worships, with commendations &c. It may please you to be advertised, yt my last I sent from Smolensco, which I trust you have received wt other letters to divers of our English men, wherein I certified you of my long retayning there, as also of my departure from thence, and howe that I had hired a Totar to bring mee to Danske. We came to a certaine village on Satterday the sixe and twentieth of Februarie, and there remained that night and Sunday to refresh our horses, intending to have gone away on Munday earely. But on Saterday at night one of his neighbours departed to Tirwill, and there declared to the Captaine howe that at such a place there was a Dutch man that was come from the Mosco, and woulde ride to Danske, saying, for the one, I cannot tell what he is. The Captaine incontinent ridde to t
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A Letter of the Moscovie companie to their Agents in Russia , Master Henrie Lane, Christopher Hudson, and Thomas Glover sent in their seventh voyage to Saint Nicholas with three ships, the Swallowe, the Philip and Marie, and the Jesus the fifth of May, 1560. (search)
d. We mind to send you in our shippes 100 tunnes of salte. And because we perceive that balast is hardly to be had at our lading place there with you, we would you should have in a readinesse 100 tunnes of the white stones whereof you sent us home an example two yeres past. And likewise to have in a readinesse mastes of all sortes for our shippes : for we know not what neede wee shall have of them. The bringer hereof is Thomas Alcock, he could not be suffered the last yeare to passe through Poland . And as we wrote unto you in our shippes, hee is our servant for yeares: And for that we know him to be honest, true and painefull, our mind is he shalbe placed where he may do best service. He doth know the commodities and discommodities of all kinde of wares which you doe send us. Therefore we would you should credite his sayings both in quantitie of wares and goodnes, as also wherin is most our profit. We see by your letters that your opinion is that the ropemakers should remaine there
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage, wherein Osep Napea the Moscovite Ambas- sadour returned home into his countrey, with his entertainement at his arrivall, at Colmogro: and a large description of the maners of the Countrey. (search)
were neither called Emperours nor kings but only Ruese Velike, that is to say, great Duke. And as this Emperor which now is Ivan Vasilivich, doeth exceede his predecessors in name, that is, from a Duke to an Emperour, even so much by report he doeth exceede them in stoutnesse of courage and valiantnesse, and a great deale more: for he is no more afraid of his enemies which are not few, then the Hobbie of the larks. His enemies with whom he hath warres for the most part are these: Litto, Poland , Sweden , Denmarke, Lifland, the Crimmes, Nagaians, and the whole nation of the Tartarians, which are a stoute and a hardie people as any under the Sunne. This Emperour useth great familiaritie, as wel unto all his nobles and subjects, as also unto strangers which serve him either in his warres, or in occupations: for his pleasure is that they shall dine oftentimes in the yeere in his presence, and besides that he is oftentimes abroad, either at one Church or another, and walking with hi
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The maners, usages, and ceremonies of the Russes. (search)
were neither called Emperours nor kings but only Ruese Velike, that is to say, great Duke. And as this Emperor which now is Ivan Vasilivich, doeth exceede his predecessors in name, that is, from a Duke to an Emperour, even so much by report he doeth exceede them in stoutnesse of courage and valiantnesse, and a great deale more: for he is no more afraid of his enemies which are not few, then the Hobbie of the larks. His enemies with whom he hath warres for the most part are these: Litto, Poland , Sweden , Denmarke, Lifland, the Crimmes, Nagaians, and the whole nation of the Tartarians, which are a stoute and a hardie people as any under the Sunne. This Emperour useth great familiaritie, as wel unto all his nobles and subjects, as also unto strangers which serve him either in his warres, or in occupations: for his pleasure is that they shall dine oftentimes in the yeere in his presence, and besides that he is oftentimes abroad, either at one Church or another, and walking with hi
were neither called Emperours nor kings but only Ruese Velike, that is to say, great Duke. And as this Emperor which now is Ivan Vasilivich, doeth exceede his predecessors in name, that is, from a Duke to an Emperour, even so much by report he doeth exceede them in stoutnesse of courage and valiantnesse, and a great deale more: for he is no more afraid of his enemies which are not few, then the Hobbie of the larks. His enemies with whom he hath warres for the most part are these: Litto, Poland , Sweden , Denmarke, Lifland, the Crimmes, Nagaians, and the whole nation of the Tartarians, which are a stoute and a hardie people as any under the Sunne. This Emperour useth great familiaritie, as wel unto all his nobles and subjects, as also unto strangers which serve him either in his warres, or in occupations: for his pleasure is that they shall dine oftentimes in the yeere in his presence, and besides that he is oftentimes abroad, either at one Church or another, and walking with hi
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A remembrance given by us the Governours, Consuls, and Assistants of the company of Merchants trading into Russia , the eight day of May 1561, to our trustie friend Anthonie Jenkinson, at his departure towards Russia , and so to Persia, in this our eight journey. (search)
dominions, as aforesayd, at a reasonable price: then we will rather they may be kept till the said Summer in the yeere 1563, and then you to proceed forwards upon your journey towards Persia as aforesayd. If passage into Persia cannot be obteined the next yeere, neither good hope of passage in the yeere 1563, neither yet in the meane time good sale of our kersies in the Emperours dominions, then we thinke good for you to see if you can practise to cary your said wares by safe conduct thorow Polonia , or any other wayes unto Constantinople, or els where you thinke beter sale may be had, then in Russia . Thus have we given you to understand our meanings in this intended adventure: but forasmuch as we do consider and know, that if we should prescribe unto you any certeine way, or direct order what you should doe, we might so worke cleane contrary to our purpose and intent: therefore knowing your approved wisedome with youre experience, and also your carefull and diligent minde in the
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter of M. Henrie Lane to M. Richard Hakluit, concerning the first ambassage to our most gracious Queene Elizabeth from the Russian Emperour anno 1567, and other notable matters incident to those places and times. (search)
his judgement, and not be light of credit, and so will I. These words they termed her Majesties golden speech: and kneeling downe, kissed her hand, and departed. The letters that these two messengers brought, were delivered to me by my Lord Treasurour, being then Secretarie, to be translated, the copies whereof I had, but now cannot finde. The copie of the Queenes Majesties letter I send inclosed herewith unto your worship. I also have sent you a copy of a letter written from the king of Polonia to the Queenes Majestie, with other letters from some of our nation and factours, declaring the displeasure for our trafficke to the Russes from anno 1558 to the yere 1566, especially by the way of the Narve: in which yere of 1566, having generall procuration and commission from the Company, I was in the Low countrey at Antwerpe and Amsterdam , and sometimes in company with Polacks, Danskers, and Easterlings: and by reason I had bene a lidger in Russia , I could the better reply and prove,
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The description of the countrey of Russia, with the bredth, length, and names of the Shires. (search)
gaian Tartar, that possesseth all the countrey on the East side of Volga towards the Caspian sea. On the West and Southwest border lieth Lituania , Livonia and Polonia . The whole Countrey being nowe reduced under the government of one, conteineth these chiefe Provinces or Shires. Volodemer, (which beareth the first place in on in Lituania (to the number of 30. great Townes and more,) with Narve and Dorp in Livonia , they are quite gone, being surprised of late yeeres by the Kings of Poland and Sweden . These Shires and Provinces are reduced all into foure Jurisdictions, which they call Chetfyrds (that is) Tetrarchies, or Fourthparts. The whole Coars, of a comely person, and of a stately behaviour, as applying themselves to the fashion of the Polonian. Some of them have subjected themselves to the Kings of Poland , and professe Christianitie. The Nagay lieth Eastwarde, and is reckoned for the best man of warre among all the Tartars, but verie savage, and cruell above all th
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Of the Tartars, and other borderers to the country of Russia , with whom they have most to doe in warre, and peace. (search)
rs other Tartars that border upon Russia , as the Nagayes, the Cheremissens, the Mordwites, the Chircasses, and the Shalcans, which all differ in name more then in regiment, or other condition, from the Crim Tartar, except the Chircasses that border Southwest towardes Lituania , and are farre more civill than the rest of the Tartars, of a comely person, and of a stately behaviour, as applying themselves to the fashion of the Polonian. Some of them have subjected themselves to the Kings of Poland , and professe Christianitie. The Nagay lieth Eastwarde, and is reckoned for the best man of warre among all the Tartars, but verie savage, and cruell above all the rest. The Cheremessen Tartar, that lieth betwixt the Russe and the Nagay, are of two sorts, the Lugavoy (that is of the valley) and the Nagornay, or of the hilly countrey. These have much troubled the Emperours of Russia . And therefore they are content now to buy peace of them, under pretence of giving a yeerely pension of Russ
1 2