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C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eighth: the war of the Rebellion. (search)
s, from which island a regular line of British steamers ran to England. In Mr. Richard H. Dana's notes to Wheaton's Elements of International Law, he says of the envoys: Their character and destination were well known to the agent and master of the Trent, as well as the great interest felt by the Rebels that they should, and by the United States officials that they should not, reach their destination in safety. As passengers, they were now on the high seas. Within a few hours' sail of Nassau, the Trent was stopped and searched by the United States war vessel San Facinto, commanded by Captain Wilkes, who, without instructions, and entirely on his own responsibility, seized the two commissioners and their secretaries, and returned with them as prisoners to the United States, while the Trent was left to proceed on her voyage. Xxiii. The news of their seizure was received with unbounded sympathy and approbation. The press, and the public men of the country generally, not only
ntic only by reaching Havana, where, under a neutral flag, they might get conveyance to Europe. They took passage in the Trent, bound from Havana to St. Thomas, from which island a regular line of British steamers ran to England. In Mr. Richard H. Dana's notes to Wheaton's Elements of International Law, he says of the envoys: Their character and destination were well known to the agent and master of the Trent, as well as the great interest felt by the Rebels that they should, and by the United States officials that they should not, reach their destination in safety. As passengers, they were now on the high seas. Within a few hours' sail of Nassau, the Trent was stopped and searched by the United States war vessel San Facinto, commanded by Captain Wilkes, who, without instructions, and entirely on his own responsibility, seized the two commissioners and their secretaries, and returned with them as prisoners to the United States, while the Trent was left to proceed on her voyage.