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Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller) 38 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 26 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 18 0 Browse Search
Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 8 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 6 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 6 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 4 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 4 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 4 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, Three orations on the Agrarian law, the four against Catiline, the orations for Rabirius, Murena, Sylla, Archias, Flaccus, Scaurus, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation. You can also browse the collection for Armenia (Armenia) or search for Armenia (Armenia) in all documents.

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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, An Act for the corporation of Merchants adventurers for the discovering of new trades, made in the eight yeere of Queene Elizabeth. Anno 1566. (search)
heir trading into the said dominions of the saide mightie prince of Russia , &c. found out convenient way to saile into the saide dominions : but also passing thorow the same, and over the Caspian sea, have discovered very commodious trades into Armenia , Media, Hyrcania, Persia, and other dominions in Asia minor, hoping by Gods grace to discover also the countrey of Cathaia, and other regions very convenient to be traded into by merchants of this realme, for the great benefite and commodities ot now be subject to the said high and mightie prince Lord John Vasiliwich, his heires or successours, or to the Emperour, chiefe governour or ruler of the said country of Russia for the time being, his heires or successors, nor the countries of Armenia major or minor, Media, Hyrcania, Persia, or the Caspian sea, nor any part of them shall be sailed or traffiqued unto, visited, frequented, or haunted by any person being or that shalbe a subject or denizen of this realme, by themselves, their fa
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Notes concerning this fourth voyage into Persia, begun in the moneth of July 1568. gathered by M. Richard Willes from the mouth of Master Arthur Edwards, which was Agent in the same. (search)
e againe all by water even unto England. The merchandises which be had out of Persia for the returne of wares are silke of all sortes of colours, both raw and wrought. Also all maner of spices and drugs, pearles & precious stones, likewise carpets of divers sortes, with divers other rich merchandises. It was told me of them that came last from Persia, that there is more silke brought into some one city of Persia, then is of cloth brought into the city of London. Also that one village of Armenia named Gilgat doeth care yeerely five hundred, and sometime a thousand mules laden with silke to Halepo in Soria of Turkie, being 4. dayes journey from Tripoli , where the Venetians have their continuall abiding, and send from thence silks which they returne for English karsies and other clothes into all partes of Christendome. The maner how the Christians become Busormen, and forsake their religion. I HAVE noted here before that if any Christian wil become a Busorman, that is, one that h
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Articles of the second priviledge delivered to Laurence Chapman, which are to be annexed unto the former priviledge. (search)
a, and from thence by the countreis of Russia or Moscovia by rivers, even unto the citie of Yeraslave, and from thence by land 180. miles to Vologda, and from thence againe all by water even unto England. The merchandises which be had out of Persia for the returne of wares are silke of all sortes of colours, both raw and wrought. Also all maner of spices and drugs, pearles & precious stones, likewise carpets of divers sortes, with divers other rich merchandises. It was told me of them that came last from Persia, that there is more silke brought into some one city of Persia, then is of cloth brought into the city of London. Also that one village of Armenia named Gilgat doeth care yeerely five hundred, and sometime a thousand mules laden with silke to Halepo in Soria of Turkie, being 4. dayes journey from Tripoli , where the Venetians have their continuall abiding, and send from thence silks which they returne for English karsies and other clothes into all partes of Christendome.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The names of such countries as I Anthony Jenkinson have travelled unto, from the second of October 1546, at which time I made my first voyage out of England, untill the yeere of our Lord 1572, when I returned last out of Russia . (search)
t adjacent, as Chircassi, Comul, Shascal, Shirvan, with many others. I have travelled 40 daies journey beyond the said sea, towards the Oriental India, and Cathaia, through divers deserts and wildernesses, and passed through 5 kingdomes of the Tartars, and all the land of Turkeman and Zagatay, and so to the great citie of Boghar in Bactria , not without great perils and dangers sundry times. After all this, in An. 1562, I passed againe over the Caspian sea another way, and landed in Armenia , at a citie called Derbent, built by Alexander the great, & from thence travelled through Media, Parthia , Hircania, into Persia to the court of the great Sophie called Shaw Tamasso, unto whom I delivered letters from the Queenes majestie, and remained in his court 8 moneths, and returning homeward, passed through divers other countries. Finally I made two voyages more after that out of England into Russia , the one in the yeere 1566, and the other in the yeere 1571. And thus being weary an
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Advertisements and reports of the 6. voyage into the parts of Persia and Media, for the companie of English merchants for the discoverie of new trades, in the yeeres 1579. 1580. and 1581. gathered out of sundrie letters written by Christopher Burrough, servant to the saide companies, and sent to his uncle Master William Burrough. (search)
he ruines of the castle, and certaine tombs, wherein as it seemeth have bin laid noble personages : for upon a tombe stone might be perceived the forme of a horse and a man sitting on it with a bow in his hand, and arrowes girt to his side: there was a piece of a scutchion also upon one of the stones, which had characters graven on it, whereof some part had bene consumed with the weather, and the rest left unperfect: but by the forme of them that remained, we judged them to be characters of Armenia : and other characters were graven also upon another tombe stone. Nowe they departed from Oveak the said fift of October at five of the clocke after noone, and came to Peravolok the 10. day about eleven or twelve of the clocke that night, making no abode at that place, but passed alongst by it. This worde Peravolok in the Russe tongue doeth signifie a narrow straight or necke of land betweene two waters, and it is so called by them, because from the river Volga , at that place, to the river
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The description of the countrey of Russia, with the bredth, length, and names of the Shires. (search)
the Climat. Their chief furres are these, Blacke fox, Sables, Lusernes, dun fox, Martrones, Gurnestalles or Armins, Lasets or Miniver, Bever , Wulverins, the skin of a great water Rat that smelleth naturally like muske, Calaber or gray squirrel, red squirrel, red & white fox. Besides the great quantitie spent within ye Countrey (the people being clad al in furres the whole winter) there are transported out of the Countrey some yeeres by the merchants of Turkie, Persia, Bougharia, Georgia , Armenia , and some other of Christendom, to the value of foure or five hundred thousand rubbles, as I have heard of the merchants. The best Sable furre groweth in the countrey of Pechora, Momgosorskoy and Obdorskoy, the worser sort in Siberia , Perm , & other places. The blacke foxe and red come out of Siberia , white and dunne from Pechora, whence also come the white wolfe, and white Beare skin. The best Wulverin also thence and from Perm . The best Martrons are from Siberia , Cadam, Morum, Perm ,
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The native commodities of the Countrey. (search)
the Climat. Their chief furres are these, Blacke fox, Sables, Lusernes, dun fox, Martrones, Gurnestalles or Armins, Lasets or Miniver, Bever , Wulverins, the skin of a great water Rat that smelleth naturally like muske, Calaber or gray squirrel, red squirrel, red & white fox. Besides the great quantitie spent within ye Countrey (the people being clad al in furres the whole winter) there are transported out of the Countrey some yeeres by the merchants of Turkie, Persia, Bougharia, Georgia , Armenia , and some other of Christendom, to the value of foure or five hundred thousand rubbles, as I have heard of the merchants. The best Sable furre groweth in the countrey of Pechora, Momgosorskoy and Obdorskoy, the worser sort in Siberia , Perm , & other places. The blacke foxe and red come out of Siberia , white and dunne from Pechora, whence also come the white wolfe, and white Beare skin. The best Wulverin also thence and from Perm . The best Martrons are from Siberia , Cadam, Morum, Perm ,
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage and travell of M. Caesar Fredericke, Marchant of Venice, into the East India, and beyond the Indies. Wherein are conteined the customes and rites of those countries, the merchandises and commodities, aswell of golde and silver, as spices, drugges, pearles, and other jewels: translated out of Italian by M. Thomas Hickocke. (search)
with his ship, with whom I went: and when we were arrived in Cyprus , I left that ship, and went in a lesser to Tripoly in Soria , where I stayed a while. Afterward I tooke my journey to Alepo, and there I acquainted my selfe with marchants of Armenia , and Moores, that were marchants, and consorted to go with them to Ormus, and wee departed from Alepo, and in two dayes journey and a halfe, wee came to a city called Bir. Of the city called Bir. BIR is a small city verlous, and of great trade of strangers because it is a great thorowfare for Persia, Turkia, and Arabia : and very often times there goe out from thence Carovans into divers countreys: and the city is very copious of victuals, which comme out of Armenia downe the river of Tygris, on certaine Zattares or Raffes made of blowen hides or skinnes called Utrii. This river Tygris doeth wash the walles of the city. These Raffes are bound fast together, and then they lay boards on the aforesayd blowen s
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A voyage to the East Indies, and beyond the Indies, &c. (search)
A voyage to the East Indies, and beyond the Indies, &c. IN the yere of our Lord God 1563, I Caesar Fredericke being in Venice , and very desirous to see the East parts of the world, shipped my selfe in a shippe called the Gradaige of Venice, with certaine marchandise, governed by M. Jacomo Vatica, which was bound to Cyprus with his ship, with whom I went: and when we were arrived in Cyprus , I left that ship, and went in a lesser to Tripoly in Soria , where I stayed a while. Afterward I tooke my journey to Alepo, and there I acquainted my selfe with marchants of Armenia , and Moores, that were marchants, and consorted to go with them to Ormus, and wee departed from Alepo, and in two dayes journey and a halfe, wee came to a city called Bir.
Feluchia and Babylon. FELUCHIA is a village where they that come from Bir doe unbarke themselves and unlade their goods, and it is distant from Babylon a dayes journey and an halfe by land: Babylon is no great city, but it is very populous, and of great trade of strangers because it is a great thorowfare for Persia, Turkia, and Arabia : and very often times there goe out from thence Carovans into divers countreys: and the city is very copious of victuals, which comme out of Armenia downe the river of Tygris, on certaine Zattares or Raffes made of blowen hides or skinnes called Utrii. This river Tygris doeth wash the walles of the city. These Raffes are bound fast together, and then they lay boards on the aforesayd blowen skinnes, and on the boards they lade the commodities, and so come they to Babylon, where they unlade them, and being unladen, they let out the winde out of the skinnes, and lade them on cammels to make another voyage. This city of Babylon is situate i
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