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P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 6 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 6 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 4 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 2 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 2 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 2 0 Browse Search
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M. Tullius Cicero, For Sextus Roscius of Ameria (ed. C. D. Yonge), chapter 23 (search)
Not many years ago they say that Titius Cloelius, a citizen of Terracina, a well-known man, when, having supped, he had retired to rest in the same room with his two youthful sons, was found in the morning with his throat cut: when no servant could be found nor any free man, on whom suspicion of the deed could be fixed, and his two sons of that age lying near him said that they did not even know what had been done; the sons were accused of the parricide. What followed? it was, indeed, a suspicious business; that neither of them were aware of it, and that some one had ventured to introduce himself into that chamber, especially at that time when two young men were in the same place, who might easily have heard the noise and defended him. Moreover, there was no one on whom suspicion of the deed could fall. Still as it was plain to the judges that they were f
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams), Book 7, line 783 (search)
med, of mighty frame, his lordly head high o'er his peers emerging! His tall helm with flowing triple crest for ensign bears Chimaera, whose terrific lips outpour volcanic fires; where'er the menace moves of her infernal flames and wrathful frown, there wildest flows the purple flood of war. On his smooth shield deep graven in the gold is horned Io—wondrous the device!— a shaggy heifer-shape the maiden shows; Argus is watching her, while Inachus pours forth his river from the pictured urn. A storm of tramping troops, to Turnus sworn, throngs all the widespread plain with serried shields: warriors of Argos, and Auruncan bands, Sicani, Rutuli, Sacranian hosts, Labicum's painted shields; all who till thy woodland vales, O Tiber! or the shore Numicius hallows; all whose ploughs upturn Rutulia's hills, or that Circaean range where Jove of Anxur guards, and forests green make fair Feronia glad; where lie the fens of Satura, and Ufens' icy wave through lowland valleys seeks his seaward w
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams), Book 10, line 543 (search)
Soon to fresh fight came Caeculus, a child of Vulcan's line, and Umbro on the Marsic mountains bred: these met the Trojan's wrath. His sword shore off Anxur's left hand, and the whole orbed shield dropped earthward at the stroke: though Anxur's tongue had boasted mighty things, as if great words would make him strong, and lifting his proud heart as high as heaven, had hoped perchance to see gray hairs and length of days. Then Tarquitus strode forth, exulting in his burnished arms (Him Dryope, Anxur's tongue had boasted mighty things, as if great words would make him strong, and lifting his proud heart as high as heaven, had hoped perchance to see gray hairs and length of days. Then Tarquitus strode forth, exulting in his burnished arms (Him Dryope, the nymph, to Faunus bore), and dared oppose Aeneas' rage. But he drew back his lance and, charging, crushed at once corselet and ponderous shield; then off he struck the supplicating head, which seemed in vain preparing speech; while o'er the reeking corpse the victor stood, and thrusting it away spoke thus with wrathful soul: “Now lie thou there, thou fearsome sight! No noble mother's hand shall hide thee in the ground, or give those limbs to their ancestral tomb. Thou shalt be left to birds
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley), book 1, He describes a certain journey of his from Rome to Brundusium with great pleasantry. (search)
d names for the hours of the day. The twelve tables divided it into three parts; the rising sun, the setting sun, and mid-day. The hours of night and day were equal in number through the year; but from spring to autumn, those of the day were longer than those of the night, and from September to March the hours of night were longest. We wash our faces and hands in thy water, O Feronia. Then, having dined, we crawled on three miles; and arrive under Anxur, which is built upon rocks that look white to a great distance. Maecenas was to come here, as was the excellent Cocceius, both sent embassadors on matters of great importance; having been accustomed to reconcile friends at variance. Three particulars demonstrate that this journey was to the second conference at Brundusium. Fonteius is here joined with Maecenas and Cocceius, but was not engaged in the first. The poet says, that Maecenas and Cocceius had
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Divus Augustus (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 95 (search)
truck out by lightning; which was interpreted as a presage that he would live only a hundred days longer, the letter C denoting that number; and that he would be placed amongst the Gods, as Aesar, which is the remaining part of the word Caesar, signifies, in the Tuscan language, a God. Aesar is a Greek word with an Etruscan termination; ai)=sa signifying fate. Being, therefore, about dispatching Tiberius to Illyricum, and designing to go with him as far as Beneventum, but being detained by several persons who applied to him respecting causes they had depending, he cried out, (and it was afterwards regarded as an omen of his death), "Not all the business in the world, shall detain me at Rome one moment longer;" and setting out upon his journey, he went as far as Astura; Astura stood not far from Terracina, on the road to Naples. Augustus embarked there for the islands lying off that coast. whence, contrary to his custom, he put to sea in the nighttime, as there was a favourable wind.
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Tiberius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 39 (search)
conversation were almost general, that he never would return, and would die soon. And both nearly turned out to be true. For indeed he never more came to Rome; and a few days after leaving it, when he was at a villa of his called the Cave, near Terracina,Terracina, standing at the southern extremity of the Pontine Marshes, on the shore of the Mediterranean. It is surrounded by high calcareous cliffs, in which there are caverns, affording, as Strabo informs us, cool retreats, attached to the Rofew days after leaving it, when he was at a villa of his called the Cave, near Terracina,Terracina, standing at the southern extremity of the Pontine Marshes, on the shore of the Mediterranean. It is surrounded by high calcareous cliffs, in which there are caverns, affording, as Strabo informs us, cool retreats, attached to the Roman villas built round. during supper a great many huge stones fell from above, which killed several of the guests and attendants; but he almost hopelessly escaped.
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Tiberius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 72 (search)
himself with a snake, and upon going to feed it with his own hand, according to custom, he found it devoured by ants: from which he was advised to beware of the fury of the mob. On this account, returning in all haste to Campania, he fell ill at Astura ; A small town on the coast of Latium, and the present Nettuno. It was here that Cicero was slain by the satellites of Antony. but recovering a little, went on to Circeii. A town on a promontory of the same dreary coast, between Antium and Terracina, built on a promontory surrounded by the sea and the marsh still called Circello. And to obviate any suspicion of his being in a bad state of health, he was not only present at the sports in the camp, but encountered, with javelins, a wild boar, which was let loose in the arena. Being immediately seized with a pain in the side, and catching cold upon his overheating himself in the exercise, he relapsed into a worse condition than he was before. He held out, however, for some time; and sai
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Galba (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 4 (search)
The emperor Sergius Galba was born in the consulship of M. Valerius Messala, and Cn. Lentulus, upon the ninth of the calends of January [24th December],A. U. C. 751. in a villa standing upon a hill, near Terracina, on the lefthand side of the road to Fundi. Now Fondi, which, with Terracina, still bearing its original name, lie on the road to Naples. See TIBERIUS, cc. v. and xxxix. Being adopted by his step-mother,Livia Ocellina, mentioned just before. he assumed the name of Livius, with the Terracina, still bearing its original name, lie on the road to Naples. See TIBERIUS, cc. v. and xxxix. Being adopted by his step-mother,Livia Ocellina, mentioned just before. he assumed the name of Livius, with the cognomen of Ocella, and changed his praenomen; for he afterwards used that of Lucius, instead of Sergius, until he arrived at the imperial dignity. It is well known, that when he came once, amongst other boys of his own age, to pay his respects to Augustus, the latter, pinching his cheek, said to him, "And thou, child, too, wilt taste our imperial dignity." Tiberius, likewise, being told that he would come to be emperor, but at an advanced age, exclaimed, " Let him live, then, since that does n
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, Vitellius (ed. Alexander Thomson), chapter 18 (search)
He perished with his brother and son, Lucius and Germanicus, the brother and son of Vitellius, were slain near Terracina; the former was marching to his brother's relief. in the fifty-seventh year of his age,A.U.C. 822 and verified the prediction of those who, from the omen which happened to him at Vienne, as before related,C. ix foretold that he would be made prisoner by some man of Gaul. For he was seized by Antoninus Primus, a general of the adverse party, who was born at Toulouse, and, when a boy, had the cognomon of Becco,Becco, from whence the French bee, and English beak; with, probably, the family names of Bec or Bek. This distinguished provincial, under his Latin name of Antoninus Primus, commanded the seventh legion in Gaul. His character is well drawn by Tacitus, in his usual terse style, Hist. XI. 86. 2. which signifies a cock's beak.
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 3, line 84 (search)
Now Anxur's hold was passed, the oozy road That separates the marsh, the grove sublime Near Aricia. (See Book VI., 93.) Where reigns the Scythian goddess, and the path By which men bear the fasces to the feast On Alba's summit. From the height afar- Gazing in awe upon the walls of Rome His native city, since the Northern war Unseen, unvisited-thus Caesar spake: 'Seat of the gods, have men deserted thee, 'Thee, Rome, without a blow? Then for what town 'Shall men do battle? Thank the gods, no host 'From Eastern climes has sought Italia's shores 'To wreak its fury; nor Sarmatian horde 'With northern tribes conjoined; by Fortune's gift 'This war is civil: else this coward chief 'Had been thy ruin.' Trembling at his feet He found the city: deadly fire and flame, As from a conqueror; gods and fanes dispersed; Such was the measure of their fear, as though His power and wish were one. No festal shout Greeted his march, no feigned acclaim of joy. Scarce had they time for hate. In Phoebus' ha