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C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 10 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 10 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 10 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 8 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Speech before Roman Citizens on Behalf of Gaius Rabirius, Defendant Against the Charge of Treason (ed. William Blake Tyrrell) 8 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 8 0 Browse Search
Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 6 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 6 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 6 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill). You can also browse the collection for Campus Martius (Italy) or search for Campus Martius (Italy) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Poem 10 (search)
Isis. From Alexandria, where the great Sarapeum stood, the cult spread through Greece and Italy, reaching Rome perhaps as early as the time of Sulla, though it met there with great opposition, and did not attain its height till the end of the first century after Christ. In 58 B.C., only about two years before this poem was written, the worship of the Egyptian divinities had been banished without the city walls. Upon the Campus Martius, however, Isis and Sarapis found a resting-place, and their temples were much frequented by the lower classes. Courtesans especially flocked to Isis, and invalids to Sarapis, whose priests were reputed to have wondrous powers of healing. But Sarapis may stand here for both divinities, and there is no need to suppose the girl was ill because of her professed destination or of her request for the use of a lectica. The spelling Sa
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Poem 55 (search)
Fast. 3.519ff.). This is possibly the place meant, as the search passed from it through the Circus Maximus, by the shops near the Forum (cf. Catul. 37.2n.), over the Capitoline, to Pompey's portico in the Campus Martius. There were yet other campi; cf. Prop. 3.23.6 campo quo movet illa pedes? Not. et Cur. App. I. Campi VIII., etc. On the ablative without in cf. Ovid and Prop. ll. cc.; Liv. 21.8.7 A.D. under Vitellius (cf. Tac. Hist. 3.72). Magni ambulatione: in the summer of 55 B.C., the year of his second consulship, Pompey threw open to the public his stone theatre on the Campus Martius, with a magnificent porticus adjoining it in the rear of the stage. He is frequently mentioned by his contemporaries under the title Magnus, conferred by Sulla in 81 for his African victories.