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C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 10 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 10 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 10 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 8 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Speech before Roman Citizens on Behalf of Gaius Rabirius, Defendant Against the Charge of Treason (ed. William Blake Tyrrell) 8 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 8 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 6 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), The Works of Horace (ed. C. Smart, Theodore Alois Buckley) 6 0 Browse Search
Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 6 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in M. Tullius Cicero, Speech before Roman Citizens on Behalf of Gaius Rabirius, Defendant Against the Charge of Treason (ed. William Blake Tyrrell). You can also browse the collection for Campus Martius (Italy) or search for Campus Martius (Italy) in all documents.

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t he directed—shall we condemn Lucius Flaccus in death for the unspeakable crime of murder? Shall we add to this stain and disgrace of death even the name of Gaius Marius? Gaius Marius whom we truly can call the father of the fatherland, parent, I say, of your liberty and of this Republic, shall we condemn him in death for the unspeakable crime of murder? Indeed, if in the case of Gaius Rabirius because he ran to the call for arms, Titus Labienus thought that a cross must be fixed in the Campus Martius, just what punishment will be devised for that man who summoned Rabirius? And if the promise of protective custody was given to Saturninus, as you have repeatedly claimed, Gaius Rabirius did not give it, but Gaius Marius gave it, and the same man violated it if he did not abide by its protection. What protective custody, Labienus, could be given, how could it be given, without a decree of the senate? [Are you] such a stranger to this city, so ignorant of our ways and customs that you do
, you wanted to be short and curtailed. This part, however, cries out for and demands, not the talents of an orator, but the support of a consul. The charge concerning the condemnation for treason, which you keep accusing me of having abolished, is directed against me, not Rabirius. Would that I, Roman citizens, had been the first or the only man to have abolished that condemnation from this Republic! Would that this deed, which Labienus maintains is a charge against me, were testimony to my praises and no other's! What possible wish would I rather be granted than I, in my consulship, abolished the executioner from the forum and the cross from the Campus Martius? But that praise falls first to our ancestors, Roman citizens, who expelled the kings, and, afterwards, did not retain a trace of kingly savagery among a free people, and, secondly, to the many brave men who did not want your freedom to be unsafe from the severity of its punishments but fortified by the leniency of its laws.
, which one of us is a benefactor of the people? You, who think an executioner and his fetters ought to be inflicted upon Roman citizens in a public meeting? You, who order a cross to be fixed and erected for the punishment of citizens in the Campus Martius where the auspices are taken for the Centuriate Assembly? Or I, who prohibit a public meeting from being contaminated by the pollution of an executioner? I, who say that the forum of the Roman people must be cleansed of those traces of an unspeakable crime? I, who defend the belief that a public assembly ought to be kept pure, the Campus Martius holy, the body of every Roman citizen undefiled, and the right of liberty unassailable? This tribune of the commoners, this guardian and defender of right and liberty—a benefactor of the people! Really? A law of Porcius removed the rods from the body of all Roman citizens; this man of compassion has brought back scourges. A law of Porcius delivered the liberty of citizens from the lictor;