Browsing named entities in Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. You can also browse the collection for Saltillo (Coahuila, Mexico) or search for Saltillo (Coahuila, Mexico) in all documents.

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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Advance on Monterey-the Black Fort-the battle of Monterey-surrender of the City (search)
f the city, which were also fortified. On one of these stood the Bishop's Palace. The road to Saltillo leaves the upper or western end of the city under the fire of the guns from these heights. Thenge of the Black Fort and the works on the detached hills to the north-west of the city, to the Saltillo road. With this road in our possession, the enemy would be cut off from receiving further suppl Worth, with his division somewhat reinforced, was given the task of gaining possession of the Saltillo road, and of carrying the detached works outside the city, in that quarter. He started on his ander of the victorious National army at the battle of Gettysburgmadede a reconnaissance to the Saltillo road under cover of night. During the night of the 20th General Taylor had established a baotected our troops so long as they were inactive. On the west General Worth had reached the Saltillo road after some fighting but without heavy loss. He turned from his new position and captured
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Political Intrigue — Buena Vista — movement against Vera Cruz-siege and capture of Vera Cruz (search)
andidate for the Presidency. It was necessary to destroy his chances promptly. The problem was to do this without the loss of conquest and without permitting another general of the same political party to acquire like popularity. The fact is, the administration of Mr. Polk made every preparation to disgrace Scott, or, to speak more correctly, to drive him to such desperation that he would disgrace himself. General Scott had opposed conquest by the way of the Rio Grande, Matamoras and Saltillo from the first. Now that he was in command of all the forces in Mexico, he withdrew from Taylor most of his regular troops and left him only enough volunteers, as he thought, to hold the line then in possession of the invading army. Indeed Scott did not deem it important to hold anything beyond the Rio Grande, and authorized Taylor to fall back to that line if he chose. General Taylor protested against the depletion of his army, and his subsequent movement upon Buena Vista would indicat
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, March to Jalapa-battle of Cerro Gordo-Perote-Puebla-Scott and Taylor (search)
mportant to the success of General Scott at Cerro Gordo and in his entire campaign from Vera Cruz to the great plains, reaching to the City of Mexico. The only Army Santa Anna had to protect his capital and the mountain passes west of Vera Cruz, was the one he had with him confronting General Taylor. It is not likely that he would have gone as far north as Monterey to attack the United States troops when he knew his country was threatened with invasion further south. When Taylor moved to Saltillo and then advanced on to Buena Vista, Santa Anna crossed the desert confronting the invading army, hoping no doubt to crush it and get back in time to meet General Scott in the mountain passes west of Vera Cruz. His attack on Taylor was disastrous to the Mexican army, but, notwithstanding this, he marched his army to Cerro Gordo, a distance not much short of one thousand miles by the line he had to travel, in time to intrench himself well before Scott got there. If he had been successful a