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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 938 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 220 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 178 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 148 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 96 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 92 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1 88 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 66 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 64 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 2 64 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for California (California, United States) or search for California (California, United States) in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alvarado, Pedro de, 1485- (search)
Alvarado, Pedro de, 1485- A, Spanish conqueror in America; born in Badajos, Spain, about 1485. Sailing from Spain to Cuba, in 1518, he accompanied Grijalva on his exploring expedition along the Gulf coasts. Alvarado made explorations and discoveries on the coast of California, and was killed in a skirmish with the natives in New Galicia, June 4, 1541.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), American party, (search)
reference to the party. It was at first a secret political organization, the chief object of which was the proscription of foreigners by the repeal of the naturalization laws of the United States, and the exclusive choice of Americans for office. The more radical members of the party advocated a purely American school system, and uncomlpromising opposition to the Roman Catholics. Such narrow views were incompatible with the generosity and catholic spirit of enlightened American citizens. In 1856 they nominated ex-President Fillmore for the Presidency, who received 874,534 popular and eight electoral votes; made no nominations in 1860, but united with the Constitutional Union party, whose candidates. Bell and Everett, received 590,631 popular and thirty-nine electoral votes; reappeared with a ticket in 1880, which received 707 popular votes; and again in 1888, when 1,591 votes were cast for the party candidates in California; and have made no nominations since. See know-Nothings.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), American protective Association, (search)
for the order in the political field that the conditions changed and the ambitions politician suddenly awoke to the realization that baptism in A. P. A. water was attended with pleasant and profitable political consequences. In the two years that followed the order planted itself firmly in every State and Territory in the Union, and was instrumental in overturning the entire political machinery in New York, Massachusetts, Michigan, Missouri, Tennessee, Kentucky, Ohio, and Iowa, and of California, Minnesota, Pennsylvania. Wisconsin, Washington, and Oregon, in part. With these victories commenced a general policy of active aggression, and the negative tactics of the organization were practically abandoned. The opening of the Fifty-fourth Congress demonstrated the power of the organization in the political field as no event had previously done. Nearly one hundred members of the House of Representatives were elected to office pledged to support the platform of the order, either as
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ames, Oakes, 1804-1873 (search)
Ames, Oakes, 1804-1873 Manufacturer; born in Easton, Mass., Jan. 10, 1804; received a public school education; entered his father's workshop and became thoroughly familiar with the manufacture of shovels and picks. Subsequently he became a member of the firm of Oliver Ames & Sons. During the gold excitement in California and in Australia this firm had an enormous trade with miners, and during the Civil War it furnished the government with extensive supplies of shovels and swords. When the Union Pacific Railroad was being built the firm held large contracts which afterwards were transferred to a corporation known as the Credit Mobilier of America, of which Oakes Ames became one of the largest stockholders. In 1862-73 he was a member of Congress from Massachusetts. His connection with the Credit Mobilier, including an allegation of having improperly given stock to several members of Congress, was investigated by a committee of the House of Representatives and he was censured by
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arizona, (search)
estimated that fully 100,000 people must have inhabited the valley of the Gila alone. Arizona was settled by Spanish missionaries from Mexico as early as 1687. These missions were principally seated on the Lower Colorado and Gila rivers. The Territory formed a part of Mexico until its purchase by the United States in 1850. It was organized into a Territory by act of Congress, Feb. 24, 1863, with its area described as comprising all the United States lands west of longitude 109° to the California line. Since then the northwest corner has been ceded to Nevada. It is a mountainous region, and some of the northern portion remains unexplored. Population in 1890, 59,691; in 1900, 122,212. To one of the pioneer explorers of the Arizona region the Zuni Indians gave the following account of their origin as preserved in their traditions. Their legend relates that in the beginning a race of men sprang up out of the earth, as plants arise and come forth in the spring. This race increa
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Armour, Philip Danforth, 1832- (search)
Armour, Philip Danforth, 1832- Philanthropist; born in Stockbridge, N. Y., May 16, 1832; received a public school education. In 1852-56 he was a miner in California; in 1856-63 engaged in the commission business in Milwaukee, Wis., and then became a member of the firm of Plankinton, Armour & Company, meat packers. Mr. Armour was a man of large benevolence. In 1892 he built the Armour Institute of Technology in Chicago at a cost of $1,500,000, and in the same year endowed it with $1,400,000; in 1898 he increased this endowment by $500,000; and in 1899 made another addition of $750,000. He died in Chicago, Jan. 6, 1901.
e, excepting the Island of Mindanao and all islands east of the Straits of Surigao; headquarters, Iloilo, P. I. Commander, Brig.-Gen. Robert P. Hughes. Department of Mindanao and Jolo.--Includes all the remaining islands of the Philippine Archipelago; headquarters, Zamboanga, P. I. Commander, Brig.-Gen. William A. Kobbe. Department of Alaska.--Territory of Alaska; headquarters, Fort St. Michael, Alaska. Commander, Brig.-Gen. George M. Randall. Department of California.--States of California and Nevada, the Hawaiian Islands and their dependencies; headquarters, San Francisco, Cal. Commander, Maj.-Gen. William R. Shafter. Department of the Colorado.--States of Wyoming (except so much thereof as is embraced in the Yellowstone National Park), Colorado, and Utah, and the Territories of Arizona and New Mexico: headquarters, Denver, Col. Commander, Brig.-Gen. Henry C. Merriam. Department of the Columbia.--States of Washington, Oregon, Idaho (except so much of the latter as is
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arnold, Richard, 1828- (search)
Arnold, Richard, 1828- Military officer; born in Providence, R. I., April 12, 1828; was graduated at West Point in 1850. He served in Florida, California, at the battle of Bull Run, on the Peninsula, and was made chief of artillery of Banks's expedition in November, 1862. At Port Hudson and in the Red River campaign he rendered important service; also in the capture of Fort Fisher, and of Fort Morgan, near Mobile. He was brevetted major-general United States army in 1866. He died on Governor's Island, New York, Nov. 8, 1882.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arthur, Chester Alan, 1830-1886 (search)
tes under this power would be adapted to such circumstances. For example, there might be a demand for Chinese labor in the South and a surplus of such labor in California, and Congress might legislate in accordance with these facts. In general, the legislation would be in view of and depend upon circumstances of the situation at the same direction. Our intercourse with China is of recent date. Our first treaty with that power is not yet forty years old. It is only since we acquired California and established a great seat of commerce on the Pacific that we may be said to have broken down the barriers which fenced in that ancient monarchy. The Burlingh and influence. The opening of China to the commerce of the whole world has benefited no section of it more than the States of our own Pacific slope. The State of California and its great maritime ports especially have reaped enormous advantages from this source. Blessed with an exceptional climate, enjoying an unrivalled harbo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Asphalt, (search)
d in New York, and the leading cities of the United States and Europe. The most celebrated deposit of natural bitumen is on the island of Trinidad, whence the United States obtains its chief supply. although in the calendar year 1809 the United States had an aggregate production of asphalt and bituminous rock of 75.085 short tons, valued at $553,904, the mining being in California. Kentucky, Indian Territory, Oklahoma, Texas. Colorado, and Utah, the principal amount being mined in California. d in New York, and the leading cities of the United States and Europe. The most celebrated deposit of natural bitumen is on the island of Trinidad, whence the United States obtains its chief supply. although in the calendar year 1809 the United States had an aggregate production of asphalt and bituminous rock of 75.085 short tons, valued at $553,904, the mining being in California. Kentucky, Indian Territory, Oklahoma, Texas. Colorado, and Utah, the principal amount being mined in California.
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