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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 456 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 154 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 72 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 64 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 58 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 54 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 40 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 38 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 36 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Delaware (Delaware, United States) or search for Delaware (Delaware, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 32 results in 3 document sections:

Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States. (search)
te. Later on, New Jersey, Rhode Island and Delaware, though not going to the extreme position of ve votes, Maryland, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Delaware and Pennsylvania. Against it were New Hampshceded to the Confederation November 25, 1778. Delaware acceded February 23, 1779, but filed a protes-1804, pp. 33, 34.) Said Mr. Samuel White, of Delaware: But as to Louisiana, this new, immense, unboMadison.James Monroe.John LangdonRufus King. Delaware33 Maryland9292 Virginia2424 North Carolinaf 23 to 7. The nays were Senators Bayard, of Delaware; Champlin, of Rhode Island; Goodrich, of New The nays were: Senators Bayard and Horsey, of Delaware; Dana and Goodrich, of Connecticut; Howell anNew York2929 New Jersey88 Pennsylvania2525 Delaware44 Virginia2525 North Carolina1515 South Ca.John Marshall.R. G. Harper. Connecticut954 Delaware33 Georgia88 Indiana33 Kentucky1212 Louisird Rush.Vacancies. Alabama33 Connecticut99 Delaware44 Georgia88 Illinois33 Indiana33 Kentucky[10 more...]
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
n the general term North. The settlements of Delaware and Maryland covered the areas lying north ofrom the south line of Georgia to the north of Delaware, and westward from that wide ocean front certollowing voted nay: New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware and Virginia. Slave labor, therefore, mustpeople was carried by a vote of 65 to 58. In Delaware, Maryland and Kentucky legislation leading to had contemplated the abolition of slavery by Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, Kentucky, North Carolinay, with Ohio and New Jersey divided, and with Delaware and Illinois not voting. Conservatives divates of Pennsylvania, Indiana, New Jersey and Delaware were considered doubtful, and in them the conashington was at once extended over Maryland, Delaware and Pennsylvania, by General Scott, and postn the United States except such as resided in Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, Missouri and the Distric was it extended to citizens of the States of Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, Missouri, District of Co[1 more...]
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical: officers of civil and military organizations. (search)
Davis advocated the division of the western territory by an extension of the Missouri Compromise line to the Pacific ocean, because it had been once accepted as a settlement of the sectional question. A majority refused this mode of settlement. On this proposition to adhere to the old Missouri Compromise line of settlement the vote in the Senate was 24 yeas and 32 nays. All the yeas were cast by Southern senators. All nays were by Northern senators except Kentucky one, Missouri one and Delaware two. Mr. Davis thought that the political line of 36° 30′ had been at first objectionable on account of its establishing a geographical division of sectional interests, and was an assumption by Congress of a function not delegated to it, but the act had received such recognition through quasi-ratifications by the people of the States as to give it a value it did not originally possess. Pacification had been the fruit borne by the tree, and it should not have been recklessly hewn down and c