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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 932 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 544 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 208 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 116 0 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 98 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 96 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 94 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 86 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 84 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 78 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Florida (Florida, United States) or search for Florida (Florida, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 43 results in 35 document sections:

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Dec. 19. A meeting of members of the Georgia Legislature, favoring cooperation, was held at Milledgeville. A convention of Southern States desiring cooperation was urged, and an address to the people of South Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida, was issued.--Tribune, Dec. 20. A bill has been introduced into the Legislature of North Carolina, providing that No ordinance of said Convention, dissolving the connection of the State of North Carolina with the Federal Government, or connecting it with any other, shall have any force or validity until it shall have been submitted to, and ratified by, a majority of the qualified voters of the State for members of the General Assembly, to whom it shall be submitted for their approval or rejection. --Evening Post, Dec. 20. The Commissioner from Mississippi to Maryland addressed the citizens of Baltimore this evening. In the course of his remarks upon the intentions of the seceding States, he said: Secession i
Jan. 3. The order for the removal of guns from the Alleghany arsenal to southern forts is revoked by the War Department, under a decision of the Cabinet. Fort Pulaski, at Savannah, Ga., is taken possession of by State troops, by order of the Governor. A Book is opened in New York city, for the enrolment of volunteers to meet any demand which may be made by the Governor of the State for troops to aid in preserving the Union.--Times, Jan. 4. The Florida State Convention assembled at Tallahassee. Hon. H. Dickenson, Commissioner from Mississippi, addresses both Houses of the Delaware Legislature, inviting Delaware to join a Southern Confederacy. The House, having heard him, passed unanimously the following resolution, in which the Senate concurred: Resolved, That, having extended to Hon. H. Dickenson, Commissioner from Mississippi, the courtesy due him as a representative of a sovereign State of the Confederacy, as well as to the State he represents, we deem
ention appointed Hons. T. J. Withers, L. M. Keitt, W. W. Boyce, James Chesnut, Jr., R. B. Rhett, Jr., R. W. Barnwell, and C. G. Memminger, delegates to the General Congress of the seceding States. The United States arsenal at Mobile was taken by the secessionists at daylight this morning. It contained six stand of arms, 1,500 barrels of powder, 300,000 rounds of musket-cartridges, and other munitions of war. There was no defence.--Evening Post, Jan. 7. An appeal to the people of Florida, by the Charleston Mercury, to seize the forts and other defences at Pensacola and Key West, threatens the capture of the California treasure ships by letters of marque and privateers.--(Doc. 13.) Fast-day throughout the United States, by proclamation of the President. It is generally observed.--(Doc. 14.) Fort Morgan, at the entrance of Mobile Bay, was taken this morning by Alabama troops, and is now garrisoned by two hundred men.--The Press, Jan. 5. This evening a workingm
Apprehensions of an attack on Washington are subsiding, in consequence of the measures already taken. General Carrington, of that city, has issued a call for a military organization for its defence.--(Doc. 15.) In the State Convention of Florida, assembled at Tallahassee, resolutions were offered declaring the right of Florida to secede, and the duty of the State to prepare for secession, made special order for the 7th. A resolution was unanimously adopted in the Missouri Serate, iFlorida to secede, and the duty of the State to prepare for secession, made special order for the 7th. A resolution was unanimously adopted in the Missouri Serate, instructing the Committee on Federal Relations to report a bill calling a State Convention.--Times. Steamship Star of the West, Captain McGowan, cleared at New York for Havana and New Orleans. Two hundred and fifty artillerists and marines, with stores and ammunition, were put on board in the lower bay by steamtug, and in the night the ship went to sea, supposed to be destined for Charleston. The South Carolina Convention adjourned this morning, subject to the call of the president.--
ason assigned for this inhuman action is that the authorities want the quarters for their own troops. A Union meeting was held at Wilmington, N. C., this evening, which was attended by over one thousand persons.--Evening Post, Jan. 15. Florida and Alabama adopted ordinances of secession; Florida passed her ordinance by a vote of 62 to 7, and Alabama by yeas 61, nays 39. The Alabama Convention was far from unanimous; a large part of that State is decidedly opposed to extreme measures.Florida passed her ordinance by a vote of 62 to 7, and Alabama by yeas 61, nays 39. The Alabama Convention was far from unanimous; a large part of that State is decidedly opposed to extreme measures. The Alabama ordinance of secession calls upon the people of all the Southern States to meet in convention at Montgomery, on the 4th of February next, for the purpose of forming a provisional or permanent government. Immediately after the passage of the ordinance, an immense mass meeting was held in front of the capitol; a secession flag, presented, by the women of Montgomery, was raised on the State House, cannon were fired, guns fired, etc., and in the evening the whole town was illuminat
ends of the Senator consider it a relinquishment of his principles.--Times, Jan. 13. Fort Barrancas and the navy yard at Pensacola, were seized. The late commandant of the navy yard, in a dispatch to Government, says: Armed bodies of Florida and Alabama troops appeared before the gate of the navy yard, and demanded possession. Having no means of resistance, I surrendered and hauled down my flag. They are now in possession. A dispatch to the Florida senators announced the same administration, resuming the status quo ante bellum and we will immediately evacuate. The Pensacola navy yard contains a hundred and fifty-six thousand dollars' worth of ordnance stores.--Richmond Enquirer, Jan. 14. Artillery were ordered to Vicksburg by the Governor early this morning, to hail and question passing boats on the Mississippi river. A salute of fifteen guns was fired last night at Jackson, on the reception of the news from Alabama and Florida.--Raleigh Standard, Jan. 14.
March 14. The act, passed by the Florida Legislature, defining treason, became a law by the approval and signature of the Governor. It declares that in the event of any actual collision between the troops of the late Federal Union and those in the employ of the State of Florida, it shall be the duty of the Governor of the State to make public proclamation of the fact; and thereafter the act of holding office under the Federal Government shall be declared treason, and the person convicted shall suffer death.--Evening Post, March 26.
done so, we will meet it in a spirit as determined as the Administration has exhibited towards the South. --World, April 20. Governor Ellis, of North Carolina, telegraphed the President that he could not respond to the call for troops, as he had doubts of his authority and right to do so. A war bill, with an appropriation of $3,000,000, was passed in the New York Legislature, and signed by the Governor. The Government of the Southern Confederacy called for 32,000 men; 2,000 from Florida, and 5,000 from each of the other States.--Times, April 17. A large meeting of German workingmen was held at Newark, N. J., this evening. An attempt was made to disorganize the body, which was soon suppressed by earnest and loud repeated cries for the Constitution and the Union. Several speeches were made, and it was declared that the only hope for the workingmen was to be found in the preservation of the Government. The meeting broke up with cheers for the Union. This is a sample
ected to move with caution, and to occupy all the bridges, etc., as they advanced. A proclamation to Virginians, and address to the troops, were issued by Gen. McClellan simultaneously with the advance.--(Doc. 199.) The First Regiment of New Hampshire Volunteers, Colonel Tappan, passed through New York on their way to the seat of war. The regiment left Camp Union, at Concord, yesterday morning. Its progress through Massachusetts and Connecticut was an ovation, crowds assembling at all the stations to give them a greeting.--(Doc. 200.) Postmaster-General Blair issued the following order:--All postal service in the States of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, and Texas, will be suspended from and after the 81st inst. Letters for offices temporarily closed by this order, will be forwarded to the dead letter office, except those for Western Virginia, which will be sent to Wheeling. --Boston Transcript, May 27.
e to the passes of the mountains; and he therefore calls upon all loyal Virginians to come to the support of the United States Government, and serve in defence of their own soil.--(Doc. 241.) The New Orleans Catholic Standard says: Let no Southern child be educated outside the limits of the Confederate States. We have excellent schools and colleges at Richmond and Norfolk in Virginia; at Charleston and Columbia in South Carolina; at Savannah and Augusta in Georgia; at St. Augustine in Florida; at Mobile in Alabama; at Bay St. Louis, Pass Christian, Sulphur Springs, Vicksburg, and Natchez in Mississippi; at Fort Smith, Helena, and Little Rock in Arkansas; at Marksville, and Memphis in Tennessee; at Galveston, New Braunfels, San Antonio, Brownsville, and Liberty in Texas; and at St. Michael's Grand Coteau, Vermillionville, Thibodeaux, Donaldsonville, Natchitoches, Avoyelles, Alexandria, Shreveport, Iberville, Algiers, and New Orleans in Louisiana. The social bonds between us and
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