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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 932 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 544 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 208 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 116 0 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 98 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 96 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 94 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 86 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 84 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 78 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade). You can also browse the collection for Florida (Florida, United States) or search for Florida (Florida, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 23 results in 5 document sections:

George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 1 (search)
the treaty of 1819 between the United States and Spain, known as the Treaty of Florida, having been ratified by both governments, all just claims of American citizenms of that treaty, assumed by the United States in exchange for the cession of Florida by Spain. Thus released, Mr. Meade, in 1820, took his departure and joined hinment, could there more advantageously prosecute his claim under the Treaty of Florida, for this claim, through legal technicalities and other impediments, still remnd constant disappointment in the prosecution of his claim under the Treaty of Florida had had much to do with the termination of his career at the comparatively earfficiently strong to withstand a tour of duty in the enervating climate of southern Florida, where his regiment was then stationed. As, however, the time approached ed and improved within the ten years which had elapsed since his experience in Florida, was now, comparatively speaking, robust. During that time he had been consta
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 2 (search)
people, so that there was no use in my coming, and I might have been of more service at the Tortugas. Survey of the Dry Tortugas Islands off the south coast of Florida, in charge of Major Hartman Bache, of the Topographical Engineers, brother-in-law of Lieutenant Meade. But now that I am here I want to see it out. I find the cluld be, for by the main body of the Army I had been led to believe we were considered a sort of incubus. I have found here many of my old fellow-campaigners in Florida, all of whom have met me most warmly, only regretting I had ever left the service at all. This has been exceedingly gratifying to me. We are here without any nble, only under certain circumstances. General Worth is only a colonel in the infantry (the Eighth Regiment), but in consequence of his meritorious services in Florida he had conferred on him the brevet rank of brigadier-general. Now the question which has agitated the army has been, When does this rank take effect? The laws u
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 3 (search)
of a topographical engineer being required in Florida, he was selected for the duty and ordered to inole Indians, which still occupied parts of Florida, had, after faithfully keeping for seven yearomes, and for a while it looked as if another Florida war were imminent. General Twiggs had been Peirce at Indian River, on the east coast of Florida. He set to work, as he always did, to execbed between the western and eastern coasts of Florida. One of the results of his survey was, howeveor which Lieutenant Meade had been ordered to Florida having been accomplished, he was, in Februaryonstruction of the Carysfort Reef lighthouse, Florida, was the first work of the kind in which Lieulimate, Lieutenant Meade at once proceeded to Florida and took charge of the construction of CarysfIsland, Delaware River; Rebecca Shoal Beacon, Florida; Jupiter Inlet, Florida; Coffin's Patches,Florida; Coffin's Patches, Florida. Through an order, of April 24, 1856, relieving Lieutenant Meade from duty in the ligh
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 4 (search)
them that final success on their part is hopeless. All their calculations have failed, and there remains now but one desperate hope to them, and that is, that the enormous expenditures of the war will tire out the North; but this will prove equally false so long as we continue to gain brilliant victories, as the North will willingly spend money to acquire glory. I suppose you remember General Mackall, just captured by Pope. He paid you a visit one evening with Dr. Simons when I was in Florida. He was a great friend of mine, a clever gentleman, who would have remained with us had the Government treated Southern officers with ordinary confidence and decency. Franklin is at Warrenton, the residence of Beckham's people; when I get to Manassas, I will inquire about them. camp near Alexandria, April 10, 1862. Instead of going to-day by railroad, as was expected, we have orders now to march early to-morrow morning by the turnpike road to Manassas. This, therefore, is the las
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 7 (search)
o make it. On the 2d of January the general left Philadelphia to assume command of the Third Military District, composed of the States of Georgia, Alabama, and Florida, Headquarters at Atlanta, Georgia; and staying on his way only a few hours in Washington, solely for the purpose of seeing General Grant, he arrived in Atlanta on was in session, but embarrassed for want of funds; that in Alabama a convention had met, founded a constitution, nominated State officers, and adjourned; that in Florida an election had been held for members of a convention which was to meet on the 20th of January. In order to relieve the Georgia convention from its financial econvention to revise the constitution. As events turned out, however, Congress accepted the new constitution as framed and admitted the State to the Union. In Florida the election of members for the constitutional convention had taken place while General Meade's predecessor was in command of the district, and under advice given