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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,300 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 830 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 638 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 502 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 378 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 340 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 274 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 244 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 234 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 218 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Georgia (Georgia, United States) or search for Georgia (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 65 results in 24 document sections:

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Cursory sketch of the campaigns of General Bragg. (search)
o summarily to dispense with his services, and hence immediately called him to Richmond in the capacity of military adviser. Thus ended the connection of General Bragg with the Army of the West, or, as then more properly termed, the Army of Northern Georgia. General Bragg relieved of command and Susequent visit to the army. He never, subsequent to that time, made but one visit to his old and to him cherished command, and then to find it sadly changed—a visit pregnant with the issues of ederacy. It was at or about the time of the removal of General Johnston from, and the substitution of the bravest of the brave, the gallant J. B. Hood, to the command of the army with the rank of General. General Hood Commanding army of Northern Georgia. Hood was offered a sacrifice on the shrine of his country, and be it said to his glory and honor that, knowing it, he, for his country's good, unhesitatingly accepted its consequences. On his assumption of the command of the army, if I
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Rev. J. G. Law. (search)
cannon is heard, unless it be in Virginia, the mother of statesmen, where the last scenes of one of the bloodiest tradegies ever enacted on the American Continent are about closing. The curtain will drop, and the victorious army of the South will prove to the North, and to the World, that a people determined to be free can never be conquered. When our independence is achieved, then we will celebrate our independence day. I am on guard at General Polk's spring. Have spent the day reading Georgia Scenes. July 5th.—This has been a day of rejoicing in camp. The deep-booming of cannon, the enthusiastic cheering of the troops, and the martial music of our regimental bands mingle together in a flood of harmony. The firing of cannon was by order of General Bragg in honor of our great victory in Virginia. Latest dispatches announce that we have captured two Major-Generals, four Brigadier-Generals, over seven thousand prisoners, seventy-five pieces of artillery, fifteen thousand stand
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Agreement between the United States Government and South Carolina as to preserving the status of the Forts at Charleston. (search)
emplated for a single moment issuing an order requiring Anderson to return to Fort Moultrie. During the two or three days when that matter was under consideration and discussion several of the Southern Senators waited upon the President and urged him to issue the order; and without perhaps making any positive pledge that he would do so, his conversation and promises left the impression upon the minds of many of them that the order would be issued. Messrs. Hunter, of Virginia, Toombs, of Georgia, Mallory and Yulee, Davis, Slidell and Benjamin are among those who conferred with the President, and most of them after such conference were left with the impression that Anderson would be ordered back by the President. Mansion House, Greenville, S. C., September 19, 1881 The above is an accurate copy of the original statement as I took it down when given to me by Governor Orr. I sent a copy to General T. W. Crawford, and have his letter acknowledging its receipt. Ellison Capers. C
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Small arms. (search)
Small arms. At the formation of the government, or at the beginning of the war, the arms at command were distributed as follows, as nearly as I can recollect: Rifles.Muskets. At Richmond, Va. (about)4,000 Fayetteville Arsenal, North Carolina (about)2,00025,000 Charleston Arsenal, South Carolina (about)2,000 20,000 Augusta Arsenal, Georgia (about)3,00028,000 Mount Vernon Arsenal, Alabama2,000 20,000 Baton Rouge Arsenal, Louisiana2,00027,000 —–—– 15,000120,000 There were at Richmond about 60, 000 old, worthless flint muskets, and at Baton Rouge about 10,000 old Hall's rifles and carbines. Besides the foregoing, there were at Little Rock, Ark., a few thousand stands, and some few at the Texas arsenals, increasing the aggregate of serviceable arms to, say, 143,000. To these must be added the arms owned by the several States and by military organizations throughout the country, giving, say, 150,000 in all for the use of the armies of the Confederacy. The rifles w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Arsenals, workshops, foundries, etc. (search)
perations of two small private mills, which were then at work for the State of Tennessee. Thus, in respect to powder and our means of making it, we had, perhaps, at this time (June 1st, 1861,) 250,000 pounds, chiefly cannon, at Norfolk and in Georgia, and as much more nitre (mainly imported by the State of Georgia). We had no powder-mills, except the two rude ones just referred to, and no experience in making powder or in getting nitre. All had to be learned. As to a further supply of arState of Georgia). We had no powder-mills, except the two rude ones just referred to, and no experience in making powder or in getting nitre. All had to be learned. As to a further supply of arms, steps had been taken by the President to import these and other ordnance stores from Europe; and Major Caleb Huse, a graduate of West Point, and at that moment professor in the University of Alabama, was selected to go abroad and secure them. He left Montgomery under instructions early in April, with a credit of 10,000 (!) from Mr. Memminger. The appointment proved a happy one; for he succeeded, with a very little money, in buying a good supply, and in running the Ordnance Department into
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Progress of manufacture. (search)
the course of the Summer of 1861, established a refinery of saltpetre at or near Nashville, and to this point chiefly were sent the nitre, obtained from the State of Georgia, and that derived from caves in East and Middle Tennessee. He supplied the two powder mills in that State with nitre, properly refined, and good powder was a established a mill near Raleigh, under contract with certain parties to whom the State was to furnish the nitre, of which a great part was derived from caves in Georgia. A stamping mill was also put up near New Orleans, and powder produced before the fall of the city. Small quantities of powder were also received through the bllying ammunition. To obtain the iron needed for cannon and projectiles, it became necessary to stimulate its production in Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, and Alabama. To this end, contracts were made with iron-masters in these States on liberal terms, and advances of money made to them, to be refunded in products
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Armories and small arms. (search)
had, as heretofore stated, undertaken the making of rifle-muskets in New Orleans at the very commencement of the war. On the fall of New Orleans their machinery was hurriedly taken off by boats up the Mississippi. They finally selected Athens, Georgia, as their point of manufacture, and under a contract with me, and assisted with funds under that contract, proceeded to reorganize and extend their plant. They were reasonably successful. The want of cavalry arms caused me to make a contractour skill would enable us to supply to the cavalry. Recognizing the necessity of some great central establishment for the production of small arms, plans of buildings and estimates of machinery were made for such an one, to be built at Macon, Georgia—a point of easy access and near to a fertile corn region, out of the way of the enemy. Colonel Burton went to England and easily negotiated for the machinery, which was to have been of sufficient capacity to turn out about 10,000 arms per month
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Contributions to the history of the Confederate Ordnance Department. (search)
enal, South Carolina (about)2,000 20,000 Augusta Arsenal, Georgia (about)3,00028,000 Mount Vernon Arsenal, Alabama2,000 20,, 1861,) 250,000 pounds, chiefly cannon, at Norfolk and in Georgia, and as much more nitre (mainly imported by the State of GState of Georgia). We had no powder-mills, except the two rude ones just referred to, and no experience in making powder or in getting point chiefly were sent the nitre, obtained from the State of Georgia, and that derived from caves in East and Middle Tennethe nitre, of which a great part was derived from caves in Georgia. A stamping mill was also put up near New Orleans, and poate its production in Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, and Alabama. To this end, contracts were made with iron- boats up the Mississippi. They finally selected Athens, Georgia, as their point of manufacture, and under a contract with machinery were made for such an one, to be built at Macon, Georgia—a point of easy access and near to a fertile corn region,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 32 (search)
ssionists. But the useless part of these we soon managed to lose—sometimes in crossing rivers—sometimes by other ways. I shall write you again from Wilmington, Goldsboroa, or some other place in North Carolina. The order to march has arrived and I must close hurriedly. Love to grandmother and Aunt Charlotte. Take care of yourself and the children. Don't show this letter out of the family. Your affectionate husband, Thomas J. Myers, Lieutenant, etc. P. S.—I will send this by the first flag of truce, to be mailed, unless I have an opportunity of sending it to Hilton Head. Tell Sallie I am saving a pearl bracelet and ear-rings for her. But Lambert got the necklace and breast-pin of the same set. I am trying to trade him out of them. These were taken from the Misses Jamison, daughters of the President of the South Carolina Secession Convention. We found those on our trip through Georgia. T. J. M. This letter was addressed to Mrs. Thomas J. Myers, Boston,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A morning call on General Kilpatrick. (search)
A morning call on General Kilpatrick. By E. L. Wells. Probably there are very few great military reputations which rest upon a smaller foundation than that of General Sherman. In the popular imagination he figures as the mighty conqueror, whose campaign in Georgia and the Carolinas virtually ended the war between the States. His March to the Sea has been lauded and rhymed about until it has come to be deemed an achievement worthy to live for all time in song and story. In point of fact it was nothing of the kind, but was, in a military point of view, a very commonplace affair. When the army which had barred his further progress before Atlanta had vanished on its ill-starred errand into Tennessee, there was no hostile force of any consequence before him, and this it required but the most ordinary intelligence on his part to perceive. Surely he must have possessed an intensely Falstaffian imagination to have conjured up many men in buckram in the deserted fields, the silent s
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