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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 488 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 174 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 128 0 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 104 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 88 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 80 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 72 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 68 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 64 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. You can also browse the collection for Indiana (Indiana, United States) or search for Indiana (Indiana, United States) in all documents.

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part of the most valuable Lincolniana in existence. Out of this store the major portion of the materials of the following volumes has been drawn. I take this, my first general opportunity, to return thanks to the scores of friends in Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois, and elsewhere for the information they have so generously furnished and the favors they have so kindly extended me. Their names are too numerous for separate mention, but the recompense of each one will be the consciousness of having several years been indefatigable in exploring the course of Lincoln's life. In no particular has he been satisfied with anything taken at second hand. He has visited — as I also did in 1865--Lincoln's birthplace in Kentucky, his early homes in Indiana and Illinois, and together, so to speak, he and I have followed our hero continuously and attentively till he left Springfield in 1861 to be inaugurated President. We have retained the original Mss. in all cases, and they have never been out of
, in Hardin county, Kentucky, Mr. Lincoln usually had but little to say of himself, the lives of his parents, or the history of the family before their removal to Indiana. If he mentioned the subject at all, it was with great reluctance and significant reserve. There was something about his origin he never cared to dwell upon. Hurg we were overtaken by an old man who rode beside us for awhile, and entertained us with reminiscences of days on the frontier. Lincoln was reminded of several Indiana stories, and by the time we had reached the unpretentious court-house at our destination, his sadness had passed away. In only two instances did Mr. Lincoln owas able in later years to spell his way slowly through the Bible. In his religious belief he first affiliated with the Free-Will Baptists. After his removal to Indiana he changed his adherence to the Presbyterians — or Predestinarians, as they were then called — and later united with the Christian--vulgarly called Campbellite--
Thomas Lincoln with Kentucky. the removal to Indiana. the half-faced camp. Thomas and Betsy Sph year when their father removed with them to Indiana, it is to be presumed that neither made much ast stretches of rich and unoccupied lands in Indiana reaching his ears, and despairing of the proto it. Having determined on emigrating to Indiana, he began preparations for removal in the fal poor man, and that during his entire stay in Indiana his land barely yielded him sufficient return and their household effects to their home in Indiana. The new Mrs. Lincoln was accompanied by her. Hazel Dorsey was Abe's first teacher in Indiana. He held forth a mile and a half from the Li and wanton sport of the schoolboy. While in Indiana I met several persons who recalled a commendasome copies for practice. During my visit to Indiana I met Richardson, who showed these two lines, The foundation for his education was laid in Indiana and in the little town of New Salem in Illino
with Allen Gentry to New Orleans. return to Indiana. Customs and superstition of the pioneers. aw book Lincoln ever read was The statutes of Indiana. He obtained the volume from his friend Davire from an interesting old lady whom I met in Indiana in 1865. She was the wife of Josiah Crawfordhments for a woman reared in the backwoods of Indiana. She was not only impressed with Abe's earlyers. April 16, 1829. Records Spencer Co., Indiana. Reuben and Charles Grigsby on the same dor lost for years. Shortly before my trip to Indiana in 1865 a carpenter in Gentryville was rebuilpects. In a conversation about early days in Indiana, the President, recalling Breckenridge's argu, said an old lady whom I interviewed when in Indiana, of going eight or ten miles to church. The day, and it caused the usual stampede in southern Indiana. Dennis Hanks, discouraged by the prospeen induced to leave Kentucky for the hills of Indiana by the same rosy and alluring reports. He ha[2 more...]
he Captain's wife. return trip of the Talisman. Rowan Herndon and Lincoln pilot her through. the navigability of the Sangamon fully demonstrated. the vessel reaches Beardstown. After a fortnight of rough and fatiguing travel the colony of Indiana emigrants reached a point in Illinois five miles north-west of the town of Decatur in Macon county. John Hanks, son of that Joseph Hanks in whose shop at Elizabethtown Thomas Lincoln had learned what he knew of the carpenter's art, met and sheled him in the good graces of all New Salem. Perhaps he did not know it at the time, but he had used the weapon nearest at hand and had won. In the afternoon, as things were dragging a little, Lincoln the new man, began to spin out a stock of Indiana yarns. One that amused me more than any other he called the lizard story. The meeting-house, he said, was in the woods and quite a distance from any other house. It was only used once a month. The preacher — an old line Baptist — was dressed
Rutledge. the old story. description of the girl. the affair with John McNeil. departure of McNeil for New York. Anne learns of the change of name. her faith under fire. Lincoln appears on the scene. Courting in dead earnest. Lincoln's proposal accepted. the ghost of another love. death of Anne. effect on Lincoln's mind. his suffering. kindness of Bowlin Greene.--Oh, why should the spirit of mortal be proud? letter to Dr. Drake. return of McNamar. Since the days when in Indiana, Lincoln sat on the river's bank with little Kate Roby, dangling his bare feet in the water, there had been no hint in these pages of tender relations with any one of the opposite sex. Now we approach in timely order the grand passion of his life — a romance of much reality, the memory of which threw a melancholy shade over the remainder of his days. For the first time our hero falls in love. The courtship with Anne Rutledge and her untimely death form the saddest page in Mr. Lincoln's hi
meeting with Martin Van Buren. partnership with Stephen T. Logan. partnership with William H. Herndon. Congressional aspirations nomination and election of John J. Hardin. the Presidential campaign of 1844. Lincoln takes the stump in Southern Indiana. Lincoln nominated for Congress. the canvass against Peter Cartwright. Lincoln elected. in Congress. the spot resolutions. Opposes the Mexican war. letters to Herndon. speeches in Congress. stumping through New England. a Congresthe honorable post of Presidential elector, and he extended the limits of his acquaintance by stumping the State. This was the year the gallant and magnetic Clay went down in defeat. Lincoln, in the latter end of the canvass, crossed over into Indiana and made several speeches. He spoke at Rockport and also at Gentryville, where he met the Grigsbys, the Gentrys, and other friends of his boyhood. The result of the election was a severe disappointment to Mr. Lincoln as well as to all other Wh
ted Minister to Chili by Lincoln, when he was President, is authority. In the spring of 1849, relates Nelson, Judge Abram Hammond, who was afterwards Governor of Indiana, and I arranged to go from Terre Haute to Indianapolis in the stage coach. An entire day was usually consumed in the journey. By daybreak the stage had arrived use, thus avoiding further contact with our now distinguished fellow-traveller. Curiously enough, years after this, Hammond had vacated the office of Governor of Indiana a few days before Lincoln arrived in Indianapolis, on his way to Washington to be inaugurated President. I had many opportunities after the stage ride to cultivad locating it in Egypt The word Egypt, so frequently used in this book, refers to that portion of Illinois which lies south of the famous National Road. or in Indiana, pass it off for a purely original conception. Every recital was followed by its storm of laughter and chorus of cheers. After this had all died down, some unfo
as not in his nature to assume or attempt to bolster up a false position. Early in 1858 at Danville, Ill., I met Lincoln, Swett, and others who had returned from court in an adjoining county, and were discussing the various features of a murder trial in which Lincoln had made a vigorous fight for the prosecution and Swett had defended. The plea of the defense was insanity. On inquiring the name of the defendant I was surprised to learn that it was my old friend Isaac Wyant, formerly of Indiana. I told them that I had been Wyant's counsel frequently and had defended him from almost every charge in the calendar of crimes; and that he was a weak brother and could be led into almost everything. At once Lincoln began to manifest great interest in Wyant's history, an had to be told all about him. The next day on the way to the court — house he told me he had been greatly troubled over what I related about Wyant; that his sleep had been disturbed by the fear that he had been too bitte
estoring the Missouri Compromise, and in this State no power on earth can withstand you on that issue. The demand for Lincoln was not confined to his own State. Indiana sent for him, Wisconsin, also, while Norman B. Judd and Ebenezer Peck, who were stumping Iowa, sent for him to come there. A town committee invited him to come his private, for if old Frank (President Pierce) were to hear of my support of Fremont I would get my walking papers sure enough. A settlement of Germans in southern Indiana asked to hear him; and the president of a college, in an invitation to address the students under his charge, characterizes him as one providentially raised goes into the House of Representatives and may be made President by a compromise. But suppose again Fillmore's friends throw away a few thousand votes on him in Indiana and Illinois' it Will inevitably give these States to Buchanan, which will more than compensate him for the loss of Maryland and Kentucky; it will elect him, and
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