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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 488 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 174 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 128 0 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 104 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 88 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 80 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 72 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 68 0 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 64 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 60 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Indiana (Indiana, United States) or search for Indiana (Indiana, United States) in all documents.

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ted to promote the happiness and prosperity of the North-Western Country, and to give strength and security to that extensive frontier. In the salutary operation of this sagacious and benevolent restraint, it is believed that the inhabitants of Indiana will, at no very distant day, find ample remuneration for a temporary privation of labor, and of emigration. The session terminated the next day; and the subject was, the next winter, referred to a new committee, whereof Caesar Rodney, of De time to suspend the sixth article of compact for the government of the Territory of the United States North-West of the river Ohio. And here the long and fruitless struggle to fasten Slavery upon the vast Territory now forming the States of Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin, appears to have ended. By this time, emigration from the Free States into that Territory had begun. But it is probable that, at any time prior to 1818-20, a majority of the white settlers actually resident i
mocrats but Proffit, a Tylerized Whig), who voted for this resolve, were as follows: Maine.--Virgil D. Parris, Albert Smith.--New Hampshire.--Charles G. Atherton, Edmund Burke, Ira A. Eastman, Tristram Shaw.--New York.--Nehemiah II. Earle, John Fine, Nathaniel Jones, Gouverneur Kemble, James de la Montanya, John H. Prentiss, Theron R. Strong. Pennsylvania.--John Davis, Joseph Fornance, James Gerry, George McCullough, David Petriken, William S. Ramsay. Ohio.--D. P. Leadbetter, William Medill, Isaac Parrish, George Sweeney, Jonathan Taylor, John B. Weller. Indiana.--John Davis, George H. Proffit.--Illinois.--John Reynolds. In a little more than ten years after this, Congress prohibited the Slave-Trade in the District; and, within twenty-two years, Slavery itself, in that District, was likewise abolished by a decided vote. Thus Congress at last discovered and applied the true, enduring remedy for agitation, in hearing and heeding the demands of Justice, Humanity, and Freedom.
f eleven States; while Mr. Polk was supported by Maine, New Hampshire, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Missouri, and Arkansas--fifteen States, casting 170 electoral votes. The popular votes throughout the country, as returned, were, for Clay, votes. Up to the appearance of Mr. Clay's luckless Alabama letter, he seemed quite likely to carry every great Free State, including New York, Pennsylvania, and Indiana. Not till the election (October 8) of Shunk, the Democratic candidate for Governor of Pennsylvania, by 160,759 votes to 156,562 for his Clay competitor, Markle, decidedly promising; had Markle received the full vote (161,203) polled, some three weeks later, for Clay himself, the electoral votes of Pennsylvania, New York, Indiana, and Louisiana, would probably have been cast for the latter, giving him 185, and leaving his antagonist but 90. As it was, with Pennsylvania carried for Polk at
majority in either branch. John W. Davis, of Indiana, was chosen Speaker of the House by 120 votesay on the table, with Messrs. John Pettit, of Indiana, and Stephen A. Douglas, John A. McClernand (rederick W. Lord--1. Ohio.-Thomas Richey--1. Indiana.-Charles W. Cathcart, Thomas J. Henley, John rodhead and Mann, of Pennsylvania; Pettit, of Indiana; Ficklin and McClernand, of Illinois, who vots resolve, was reported by Caleb B. Smith, of Indiana, on the 20th, and that for New Mexico followenois, Fitzgerald of Michigan, and Hannegan of Indiana (all Democrats), from Free States. to 27 Nays whereupon Mr. Richard W. Thompson (Whig), of Indiana, moved that the House do concur with the SenaXXth) Congress, Mr. Caleb B. Smith (Whig), of Indiana (since Secretary of the Interior, under PresiJohn A. McClernand, William A. Richardson--3. Indiana.--John L. Robinson, William W. Wick--2. Democennsylvania; Douglas, of Illinois; Bright, of Indiana; Dickinson, of New York; and Fitzgerald, of M
W. Engs, and Wilson G. Hunt, are conspicuous. had refused to support him, and given their votes to Van Buren as an open, unequivocal champion of Slavery Restriction; and it was by the votes thus diverted from Gen. Taylor that Ohio, with perhaps Indiana and Wisconsin also, were given to Gen. Cass. The great body of the Northern Whigs, however, had supported the nominees of their party, not fully satisfied with Gen. Taylor's position on the Slavery question, but trusting that the influence necehairman. Messrs. Dickinson, of N. Y., Phelps, of Vt., Bell of Tenn., Cass, of Mich., Webster, of Mass., Berrien, of Ga., Cooper, of Pa., Downs, of La., King, of Ala., Mangum, of N. C., Mason, of Va., Bright, of Ind. Mr. Clay reported May 8th. from said Committee a recommendation, substantially, of his original proposition of compromise, save that he now provided for organizing Utah as a distinct Territory. His report recommended the following bases of
portunity for amendment — was ordered to a third reading by 109 Yeas to 75 Nays — every member from a Slave State who voted at all, voting Yea, with 28 Democrats and 3 Samuel A. Eliot, Massachusetts, John L. Taylor, Ohio, Edward W. McGaughey, Indiana. Whigs from Free States. From the Free States 33, from the Slave States 15 members were absent, or withheld their votes; and, as the vote in the Senate stood 27 for to 12 against it, with 21 absent, it is note-worthy that it passed either Houseen and thorough hostility to Slavery Extension and all pro-Slavery compromises, held their nominating Convention at Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, on the 11th of August; presented John P. Hale, of New Hampshire, for President, and George W. Julian, of Indiana, for Vice-President; and, though they carried no State, they polled a far stronger vote than they would or could have done but for the Whig platform aforesaid; and they made their gain wholly at the expense of Gen. Scott. When the polls were cl
uglas Archibald Dixon Salmon P. Chase Badger of N. C. English of Ind. A. H. Stephens Gov. Reeder William Philips John W. Whitfield ci to the call of his name on this occasion. of Michigan; Pettit, of Indiana; Douglas and Shields, of Illinois; Dodge (A. C.) and Jones, of Iown, of Illinois, from the Committee on Territories, Mr. English, of Indiana--a most unflinching Democrat--from the minority of said Committee,on met at Philadelphia on the 17th of June, Col. Henry S. Lane, of Indiana, presiding. John C. Fremont, of California, was nominated for Preup to the October elections wherein the States of Pennsylvania and Indiana were carried by the Democrats, rendering the election of Buchanan 4 electoral votes. Mr. Buchanan carried Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Indiana, Illinois, California, with all the Slave States but Maryland, whiked a Committee of Conference; which, on motion of Mr. English, of Indiana, who had thus far acted with the Douglas men, was granted by 109 Y
in Ohio to fully 20,000. They were beaten in Indiana on the State ticket by a very slender majoritith 113; John G. Davis, anti-Lecompton Dem., of Ind., 2; and there were 4 scattering: necessary to a Pennsylvania, Rice, of Minnesota, Bright, of Indiana, Gwin and Latham, of California, Lane, of Oreough Messrs. Latham, of California, Fitch, of Indiana, Rice, of Minnesota, and perhaps one or two o, 4 1/2; Tennessee, 1; Kentucky, 3; Ohio, 23; Indiana, 13; Illinois, 11 ; Michigan, ; Wisconsin, 5;, 4; Tennessee, 1; Kentucky, 2 1/2; Ohio, 23; Indiana, 13; Illinois, 11; Michigan, 6; Wisconsin, 5;d to the African Slave-trade. Dr. Reed, of Indiana--I am from Indiana, and I am il favor of it. Indiana, and I am il favor of it. Mr. Gaulden--Now, gentlemen, we are told, upon high authority, that there is a certain class of sen 10; Pennsylvania 7; New Jersey 3; Ohio 8; Indiana 4; Illinois 5; and Missouri 6 anti-Republicanmajority of 22,370; but when Pennsylvania and Indiana, early in October, declared unmistakably for [2 more...]
te apportioned according to the estimated strength of the several contributing parties.78,871 Fusion vote apportioned according to the estimated strength of the several contributing parties.100,000 12,776 Ohio 231,610 187,232 11,405 12,194 Indiana 139,033 115,509 12,295 5,306 Illinois 172,161 160,215 2,404 4,913 Michigan 88,480 65,057 805 405 Wisconsin 86,110 65,021 888 161 Minnesota 22,069 11,920 748 62 Iowa 70,409 55,111 1,048 1,748 California 39,173 38,516 34,334 6,817 Oregon 5,tutional obligations with respect to Slavery, but more especially in the non-rendition of fugitive slaves. New York, among other States, is herein charged (of course by mistake) with having passed acts to obstruct the return of such fugitives. Indiana and Illinois are likewise among the States thus erroneously accused. The Constitution is pronounced a compact between sovereign States, and the Convention proceeds: We maintain that, in every compact between two or more parties, the obligat
revived the old scheme of dividing the territories between Free and Slave Labor on the line of 36° 30′. Mr. English, of Indiana, proposed substantially the same thing. Mr. Noell, of Missouri, proposed an abolition of the office of President of theed in a resolve, moved by Mr. Justin S. Morrill, of Vermont, as a substitute for one moved by Mr. William McKee Dunn, of Indiana, affirming the necessity of proffering to the Slave States additional and more special guarantees of their peculiar righterritory acquired north of said States, shall constitute one section, to be known as the North. The States of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa, and Kansas, and all new States annexed or admitted into the Union, or ereceiving the requisite two-thirds-Yeas 123; Nays 71. It was reconsidered, however, on motion of Mr. Daniel Kilgore, of Indiana, seconded by February 28, 1861. Mr. Benjamin Stanton, of Ohio; adopted: Yeas 133; Nays 65: and the Senate concurred:
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