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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 310 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 94 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 40 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 40 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 36 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 28 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 0 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 26 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 24 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Iowa (Iowa, United States) or search for Iowa (Iowa, United States) in all documents.

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with all her power, were introduced into the Senate by a democrat, and passed by a unanimous vote.--N. Y. Tribune, May 8. The contributions of the people of the North for the war, during the last three weeks amount to the sum of $23,277,000. Pennsylvania leads the column with a free gift of $3, 500,000. New York and Ohio have each given $3,000,000; Connecticut and Illinois each $2,000,000; Maine, $1,300,000; Vermont and New Jersey, each $1,000,000; Wisconsin and Rhode Island, $500,000; Iowa, $100,000. The contributions of the principal cities are: New York, $2,173,000; Philadelphia, $330,000; Boston, $186,000; Brooklyn, $75,000; Buffalo, $110,000; Cincinnati, $280,000; Detroit, $50,000; Hartford, $64,000.--(Doc. 141.) The Twentieth Regiment of N. Y. S. M. from Ulster County, under the command of Colonel George W. Pratt, left New York for the seat of war.--(Doc. 142.) Reverdy Johnson addressed the Home Guard of Frederick, Md., upon the occasion of the presentation to th
nd loyal citizens, with persecutions and proscriptions of those opposed to its provisions. Complaints of these acts, he said, had been received by him as commander of the Federal forces, and also sent to Washington with appeals for relief from Union men who, in many instances, had been driven from the State. He gave his orders received from the President, stating that it devolved upon him to stop them summarily by the forces under his command, with such aid as might be required from Kansas, Iowa, and Illinois.--(Doc. 257.) An expedition of 300 Zouaves, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Warren, and accompanied by Capt. Smith, of the United States Topographical Corps, left Fortress Monroe to make a reconnoissance in the vicinity of Big Bethel and up the route to Yorktown.--N. Y. Times, June 19. At 4 P. M., as a train with telegraph constructors and 660 of the First Ohio Regiment went up the Loudon and Hampshire Railroad, Va., they were fired upon by a rebel battery stationed on
igadier-General of the Missouri State Guard, addresses the patriots: Headquarters First military District, M. S. G., Camp, St. Francois County, Oct. 14, 1861. Patriots of Washington, Jefferson, Ste. Genevieve, St. Francois, and Iron Counties! I have thrown myself into your midst to offer you an opportunity to cast off the yoke you have unwillingly worn so long. Come to me and I will assist you, and drive the invaders from your soil or die with you among your native hills. Soldiers from Iowa, Nebraska, and Illinois, go home! We want you not here, and we thirst not for your blood. We have not invaded your States, we have not polluted your hearth stones, therefore leave us; and after we have wiped out the Hessians and tories we will be your friendly neighbors if we cannot be your brothers. M. Jeff. Thompson, Brigadier-General Commanding. --St. Louis Republican, Oct. 26. The gunboat Sciota was launched from the ship-yard of Jacob Brierly, at Kensington, Philadelphia.--Re
near Baltimore, and took the steamer Pocahontas, for Salisbury, Md. They were commanded by Col. Governeur K. Warren.--Baltimore American, November 13. Several new military departments were defined by general order as follows: The Department of New Mexico is to be commanded by Col. E. R. S. Canby; the Department of Kansas, including Kansas, part of the Indian Territory, Nebraska, Colorado, and Dakota, is to be commanded by Maj.-Gen. Hunter; the Department of Missouri, including Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Illinois, Arkansas, Kentucky west of the Cumberland River, is to be commanded by Maj.-Gen. Halleck; the Department of Ohio, including Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, Kentucky east of the Cumberland River, and Tennessee, is to be commanded by Brig.-Gen. Buell; the Department of Western Virginia, including that portion of the State lately in the old Department of Ohio, is to be commanded by Brig.-Gen. Rosecrans.--N. Y. Tribune, November 13. An attack was made on the vessels
iment of cavalry that Illinois has sent into active service, besides two independent squadrons. Illinois has now sent forty-seven thousand men into the field, (two thousand six hundred more than her quota,) and some half-a-dozen other regiments are ready for marching orders.--N. Y. Times, November 27. Colonel Philip St. George Cooke was appointed Brigadier-General in the regular army of the United States.--Captain John M. Schofield, of the First Artillery, and Major Thomas J. McKean, of Iowa, were appointed Brigadier-Generals of volunteers.--The Eighty-fifth regiment of Pennsylvania Volunteers, under the command of Colonel Joshua B. Howell, left Harrisburg for the seat of war. Since the negotiation of the new loan on the 15th Nov., Secretary Chase has placed to the credit of disbursing officers in Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, over five and a half millions of dollars, to be paid to contractors and other Government creditors. Fourteen hundred cavalry, four regiment
consideration. Mr. Hale advocated its passage in a speech of considerable length, in which he opposed the restitution of the rebel envoys, and advocated in preference a war with Great Britain. The resolution was laid over under the rule.--Mr. Garrett Davis, Senator from Kentucky, gave notice of his intention to introduce a bill confiscating every species of property of all persons who have had any connection with the rebellion, either in a civil military, or naval capacity.--Mr. Harlan, of Iowa, introduced a bill to establish a Provisional Government in all the seceded States. A fire broke out in the Government stables, near the Observatory, in Washington, D. C., and from one hundred and fifty to two hundred horses out of six hundred which it contained, were burnt to death. The fire was supposed to have resulted from carelessness. The Sixth New Hampshire regiment, numbering one thousand and twenty-three men, Col. Nelson Converse, passed through New York for Washington. T
, McClernand, C. F. Smith, Lew. Wallace, and Sigel, as majorgenerals, and the following as brigadiers: Speed of Tennessee, Col. Logan of Illinois, Col. McArthur of Iowa, Col. Lauman of Iowa, Col. Wallace of Indiana, Col. McCook of Ohio, Col. Berry of Maine, and Col. Ferry of Connecticut. Both Houses of Congress passed the bill Iowa, Col. Wallace of Indiana, Col. McCook of Ohio, Col. Berry of Maine, and Col. Ferry of Connecticut. Both Houses of Congress passed the bill giving generals in command of divisions, staffs-one assistant adjutant-general, with the rank of major; one inspector-general, with the rank of major; three aids, with the rank of captains, and making the senior officer in command of artillery the commander of all artillery in the division, and giving him a position on the staff oeachers of an industrial school, which will be at once established at Port Royal, under the superintendence of Rev. M. French, of New York. Mrs. Senator Harlan of Iowa, is among the ladies, and will assist in some department of the work. Rev. Dr. Floy, of the Methodist Episcopal Church of New York, is passenger by the Atlantic.
lunteers, were this morning taken prisoners by the rebels near Yorktown, Va.--Philadelphia Inquirer. Gen. Banks's advance-guard, Col. Donnelly commanding, took three prisoners to-day, at a point nine miles beyond Harrisonburgh, Va. One of them says he belongs to company B of the Tenth Virginia regiment of infantry. This regiment had been on the Rappahannock, according to previous information.--Gen. Banks's Despatch. A body of National cavalry from Forsyth, Mo., destroyed the rebel saltpetre manufactory near Yellville, Ark., this day. Lieut. Heacock, of the Fourth regiment of Iowa cavalry, was killed and one private wounded, in the fight with the rebels.--(Doc. 146.) The Dismal Swamp Canal, N. C., was destroyed by the naval forces under Commander Rowan.--(Doc. 147.) The National fleet, under the command of Flag-Officer Farragut, after bombarding Forts Jackson and St. Philip, on the Mississippi River, passed by the forts to reduce New Orleans.--Gen. Butler's Report.
ng his army that the seizure of private property belonging to rebels, except when made by officers authorized and detailed for the purpose, was not allowed, and would be followed by severe and speedy punishment. The prize steamer Ladona, captured while endeavoring to run up the Ogeechee River, Ga., arrived at Philadelphia, Pa.--A large war meeting was held at Alexandria, Va., this evening. Jefferson Tracy presided, and speeches were made by Senator Pomeroy, of Kansas; Senator Harlan, of Iowa; Senator Chandler, of Michigan, and others. The meeting was the most enthusiastic and largest ever held in that city. Gallatin, Tenn., including a force of Union troops under Colonel Boone, a large quantity of Government stores, a railway train laden with grain, a number of Government horses, etc., was captured by a force of rebel guerrillas under Colonel John H. Morgan. In the evening, Col. Miller, having arrived from Nashville with a force of Union troops, attacked and drove out Morg
a, was this day captured in the vicinity of Gadsden, Ala., after successfully resisting the enemy in a series of skirmishes along his march, by a body of rebel troops, under the command of General Forrest.--(Doc. 173.) The battle of Chancellorsville, Va., was renewed at daylight this morning, and, after severe fighting until noon, the Nationals were obliged to fall back from their position, when hostilities, in a great measure, ceased for the day.--(Doc. 183.) The Catholic Bishop of Iowa, in a sermon at Dubuque, pointedly denounced the Knights of the Golden Circle, stating that he would give the members of the church who had joined the organization, two weeks to leave it, and then, if they still continued in it, they might consider themselves excommunicated.--The British schooner Emma Amelia was captured at St. Andrew's Bay, Fla., by the National bark Roebuck.--Grand Gulf, Miss., was abandoned at daylight this morning, the rebels blowing up the magazines and spiking their gun